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March 25, 1949 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-25

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PAGE TWO,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCU 25, 19493

Now

THE MICHIGAN STORY:
Burton ears Witness Great Building Activity

Value of Essay Not Noticed,
Asserts Professor Stevens

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is 11w sev-
enth in a series of articles presenting
the highlights in the history of the
University of Michigan.)
By ROBERT WHITEa
(Daily Associate Editor)
At the beginning of the Twen-
ties, the University of Michigan
faced a problem that could be
postponed no longer--a severe
laclk of physical facilities.
And in 1920-as in the past--
Michigan was blessed with a Presi-
dent perfectly qualified to cope
with the particular problems his
years held. Marion LeRoy Burton,
past president of Smith College
and the University of Minnesota,
was precisely the orderly, realistic,
and forceful administrator that
was needed.
* * *
PRESIDENT BURTON'S ad-
ministration began with several
striking improvements in the Uni-
versity's administrative organi-
zation.
The Board of Regents under-
Went an internal reform of its
own that was of obvious benefit
to the University. Where the
body had previously been subdi-
vided into a number of standing
committees which dealt separ-
ately with'individual University
' departments, a new plan called
for the Board's unified consid-
eration of the entire University.
In another practical decision,
the Board made the last Friday
of every month the day of its
meeting.
In Ann Arbor, meanwhile, Dr.
Burton instituted a highly success-

ful Conference of the President
and Deans. The sessions were of
an informal nature and issues sel-
dom came to a vote. Nonetheless,
the conclusions drawn by the or-
xanization-which has continued
to meet ever since-were often in-
corporated in official by-laws and
policy.
OTHER BURTON innovations
included the now indispensible
Daily Official Bulletin, general
faculty meetings for the discus-
sion of University policy, and the
Honors Convocation for students
of superior academic achievement.
But Burton's prime accom-
plishment, of course, is found in
his leadership in the transfor-
mation of a dingy and intoler-
ably over-crowded campus into
a well-equipped, well-planned
educat.1nal unity.
When the new President arrived
on the scene, enrollment was rap-
idly approaching the 10,000 mark
and packed classes were struggling
wherever space could be found-
in the tiny antique cubicals of Ma-
son Hall and South Wing, in the
basement of Tappan Hall, and in
unbelievably decadent West Hall
-an abandoned Ann Arbor public
school.
* * *
DR. BURTON, immediately ap-
palled by conditions, flatly an-
nounced that $19,000,000 was need-
ed for building purposes. Had such
a staggering sum been suggested by
another president, and directed at
a less responsive Legislature, it

might have been laughingly dis-
missed as preposterous. But Dr.
Burton-probably the most per-
suasive chief executive in Univer-
sity history-invited the entire
Legislature to Ann Arbor for a first
hand view.
Subsequently over $5,00,000 was
made available immediately.
At the same time, the Uni-
versity was granted a larger
share of the old property tax
revenue. (This latter increase in
Univcrjsity income also made
possible a series of long overdue
salary raises for the faculty.)
Building sites were selected and
,urchased by the Regents in 1921-
22, and a year later University
High, the East Engineering Build-
ing, and an addition to the Dental
Building were completed. Other
present day campus landmarks
conceived during the Burton years
include the greater University
Hospital, the East Physics Build-

ing. Yost Field House,
East Medical Building.

and theI

THE MOST awe-inspiring
structure of all completed in this
era of unprecedented building ac-
tivity was James B. Angell Hall. It
was with great satisfaction that
the literary college received its
new home but, at the same time, it
was an addition of lasting emo-
tional significance: from one point
of view the University had finally
erected a suitable memorial to
President Angell, but it had cost
the obscurity and eventual de-
structionof old University Hall,
the building which had come to
symbolize Michigan.E
For the multitude of students
who would occupy the new
buildings, a center of non-aca-
demic coordination was created
-the office of the first dean of
students, Joseph A. Bursley.
In another significant develop-

ment in 1924. the present School
of Business Administration was
established on existing founda-
tions.
* * *
ONE OF PRESIDENT Burton's
fondest ideas was fulfilled when,
in 1921, poet Robert Frost came
to Ann Arbor to occupy the Fel-
lowship of Creative Art.
The time was also ripe to end
the somewhat ridiculous senara-
tion of the department of home-
opathic medicine from the Med-
ical School proper.
But President Burton's produc-
tive effort was to be cut short
shortly after he had laid the grand
groundwork for expansion by a
tragic period of illness. Fortunate-
ly, the University's general ad-
ministrative officers-along with
President-Emeritus Hutchins -
were able to successfully carry out
his plans.

PRESIDENT BURTON advanced
Michigan to an astonishing degree
during the four years of his tenure
-not only through his extensive
program of administrative reform
and building, but also in the ex-
tremely beneficial private endow-
ments he was able to encourage.
His quiet passing on February
18, 1925, had the tragic impact
that Michigan had so often sus-
tained in the passing of her Presi-
dents.
Saturday-President Little and
the "Roaring Twenties."

"The potentialities of the essay
as an art form of great aesthetic
value have escaped the notice of
critics," asserted Prof. Stephen
Pepper of the University of Cali-
fornia in a lecture yesterday on
"The Aesthetics of the Essay."
"Because it is out of the tradi-
tional run of art, the essay holds
a lower place than other forms of
literature," Prof. Pepper ex-
plained.
* * *
HE SAID that the usual liter-
ary essay is written with great
verbal finish, loose logic and an
aloof attitude. Thus, it runs the
risk of not being called literary or
aesthetic, Prof. Pepper declared.
k

"Literary ideas in general are
treated in this casual way.
Ideas seem to be taboo and in-
der the cover of the art form in
narrative, poetry and drama,"
he said.
"But in the essay, which should
treat the ideas themselves di-
reetly, critics act as if the ideas
are least important and the form
more the thing." But ideas are
aesthetic, Prof. Pepper empha-
sized.
35c to 5 P.M.
Contnuous ram 1 P.M.
TODAY & SATURDAY

""""

I

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:.
I
5 5
4, t F -t v
04W A.t V
V.y .

ENJOY GOOD FOOD
at the rustic
LOG CABIN INN
Complete Fountain Service

I

I

I

8m~~hju9 Coffee .£7hiop
1204 South University Avenue
serving . . .
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
Closed Sundays

WANTED TO RENT
APT. WANTED by couple for summer
session only, near campus. R. E.
>arle, 130 Tyler, ph. 2-4591. )6W
ROOMS
FOR RENT
HALF double room, close to campus,
$5.00 per week. Ph. 2-7438. )48R
GRADUATE Girls across from Hill Aud.
on So. Thayer, 1st floor double room.
Continuous hot water and laundry
facilities. Ph. 2-0482. )47R
TRANSPORTATION
WOULD LIKE a ride to Wash., D.C.,
spring vac. Ph. Don, 2-2205. )11T
WANTED-Ride, couple, St. Louis, April
1. Evelyn 9972, 8-5. Usual sharing.
) 12T
COUPLE with baby desires a ride to
or near Ottawa, Illinois. Prefer to
leave April 2. Phone 2-9337. George
Dyer, 1468 University Terrace. 117.
) 16T
DRIVING to Kansas City, Mo., spring
vacation. Room for 3 or 4 passengers.
Phone 2-7150 after 6:30. Larry. )13T
COUPLE desires ride to N.Y. April 1st.
Share driving, expenses. Call Irv.,
2-8797. )7T
4 OR 5 Passengers to Buffalo, Roches-
ter, Watertown, N.Y. or Toronto, Ont.,
April 1-Returning Apr. 10. Phone
2-5180. )15T

t

.. yn:,ii .
'. p 1 ,

Continuous From 1:30 P.M.
NOW & AT..

4 i
,*--

FOR
SALE

Weekday Evenings Coming Sunday
Matinees 25c & Sundays 35c "THE ROPE"

a

MICHIGAN

Starting
SAT y!

.............
...............
"; :
<.;; ;

RO ANCE..WITH PLENTY OF
AMOUR-.-TO BE SURE !'

1947 Chevrolet convertible. Exception-
ally good cond. Call 2-2521, Ext. 331
or Ext. 480 after 5. )98
SACRIFICE SALE-Blue 1940 Packard
convertible, $450. Call Nick Radulescu,
134 Greene House, 2-4591 after 5 p.m.
)99
We have a supply of RONSON LIGHT-
ERS for sale, all models and all num-
bers at regular prices.
CALKINS-FLETCHER
State St.)5
MEN'S Schwinn built baloon tire bike.
New last Sept. Call A. King, 5660 after
6 p.m. )18
BEGUILING BONNETS, BEFLOWERED,
BERIBBONED. Every Size. Every Shape.
Modestly Priced $3.75-$14.95.
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 S. State Street )2
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Finches, Tame
Young Cocketiel. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. Seventh, phone 5330. )4
WILLING to sacrifice an 8 mm. dual-
purpose movie camera. Yau's at a
bargain price. If intere~ted, ('all
2-6040. )17
PLYMOUTH - 1941 4-door sedan, low
mileage, radio, heater. Excellent me-
chanical condition. Lustrous black
finish, clean interior. Original owner.
Call 2-1619 after 4 p. mn. )97
TUCKAWAY HOUSE
Sweater-Mates-Make them Yourself.
Matching Skirt and Sweater
See display 522 E. Liberty, Ph. 9582.
Margaret Nickelson Martin )9
FOR SALE-Tails, size 38, accessories
and shoes. Call 5054 after 5 p.m.
MARCH SALE AT SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
100%t Wool "gab" pants $9.95
Part wool Cavalry Twill Pants $4.88
Army and Navy Oxfords $6.88
)81
RADIO SERVICE, any make. Franchise
dealers for R.C.A., Motorola, General
Electric and Stewart-Warner. Aero
Radio Sales & Service. Phone 49997 )7
NEW Phillips Girl's Bicycle, 3 speed
gears. Also slightly used girl's light-
weight Schwinn. Call 2-6581, Room
3008, 12:30-1, 6:30 p.m. on. )96

BOOKS
More Bargains in Old Books
on all subjects. New titles added daily.
Good Browsing. You can't afford
to miss them.
OVERBECK BOOK STORE
1216 South University )16
e / HELP WANTED
WILLOW village student for part-time
sales work. See Mr. Paige, Sears, Roe-
buck and Co. Phone for appoint-
ment, 2-5501. )18H
SECRETARY-Permanent and better-
than-average job requiring ability and
initiative. Educational but not Uni-
versity work. 35 hour week. Two
weeks vacation with pay. Box 183,
Mich. Daily. )17H,
PERSONALS
HARPER'S Magazine - Special intro-
ductory offer. $3 yr. (reg. $5 yr.)
Just phone 2-8242. Student Periodi-
cal Agency. We'll bill you. Student-
run. )24P
A MESSAGE to our missing salesman:
We don't sell bath tubs or plumbing
fixtures. Stop sending people in for
turkish towels. Office Equipment Ser-
vice Company, 1116 S. University. )B
Attention Golfers
ILet me help you select your golfing
needs. Complete supply of Spaulding,
Wilson, MacGregor. Hagen clubs, balls,
paxs and bags. Bag Boy, collapsible
caddy carts now available. Phone
2-2058. Johnny Malloy, golf profes-
sional. (Class A) )30B
BABY SITTERS - Call Kiddie Kare,
2-1903; if no answer, 25-7364. )28B
SPRING Suits, $27.00. Former values to
$49.95. Sizes 9-15 or 10-16. Randall's
Specialty Shop, 306 S. State. ) lop
CORSAGES
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Phone 2-7032 )25B
LOST
FOUND
LOST-Parker Pen. Finder ph. Jack
Straley, 2-4401, 319 Lloyd. )88L
LOST-Beta Theta Pi fraternity pin.
Sentimental value. Finder please call
Don Porter, 2-3143. )95L
LOST-Bulova wrist watch, engraved.
If found call Jerold Wingeuot 2-0249.
91 L
COVERT topcoat exchanged with mine
at A. E. Phi open house March 6. L.
Stross, 2-4410. )92L
LOST-Brown leather billfold. Money of
no consequence; birth certificate is,
Phone Dorothy Calhoun, 2-3225. )93L
LOST - Blue Parker pencil Wed. in
Union phone booth. Write Carl
Rhoads, 1429 Swansea Ct., Willow
Run. )94L
LOST - Royce 17 jewel wrist watch.
From Balfour's along South Univer.,
Washtenaw and behind Phi Kappa
Psi to 1502 Hill. Reward. Gach, 9559.
)89L
LOST-Brown Glenn plaid suit Jacket
with full back. Needed badly. Call
Doris Kays, ph. 9532. )90L
PSYCH 94 NOTICE-Who took a camel
hair coat by mistake? Call George
Floridis, 4295 or 2-1465. )86L
BLUE FABRIC WALLET lost in Burton
Tower on Feb. 28. Contents needed
desperately. Reward. Mary Hammond.
Ph. 2-7328, 1014 Vaughn St. )58L

TYPING
TYPING WANTED-Rapid, accurate, at
reasonable rates. Phone 2-3357. )1W

CULTURED Mexican student wishes to
share well-furnished apartment for
remainder of semester with an Ameri-
can student desirous of learning
Spanish. Complete cooking facilities.
Luis Abreu, 402 No. Main. )16C
PLEASANT front room for 2 male stu-
dents on campus. Ph. 2-2052. )14F
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend guests to the
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 E. Ann Phone 8144

BUSINESS
SERVICES

n

ATTENTION ALL TYPISTS! The Stu-
dent Legislature Better Business Bu-
reau is compiling a typing service
directory. This is good advertising!
Call Barbara Little, 2-3203.
EXPERT repair service done on all
typewriters. Mosely Typewriter Co..
214 E, Washington. )23B
WASHING and Ironing. Expert work
on shirts, blouses, and dresses. Phone
2-4691. )28B
DANCE MUSIC
Chuck Downer and his orchestra
Ph. 25-0631 )27B
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TAILORING
Orders Taken for
Any Type of Uniform
Reasonable Rates 2-2020
3B
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks. Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2B
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 ) 5B

matures
WALT DISNEY'S
in French (ENGLISH TITLES) "Donald's Dilemna"
A HOFFBERG Prod. Release "FENGAL'S CAVE"

---Also
POP. SCIENCE
POPEYE - NEWS
Coming Sunday
"MEXICAN HAYRIDE"
_ - - - - - - - - - i

Three Blocks beyond Stadium Blvd.

Open 6 A.M. - 11:30 P.M. Daily

4 [] .

F

i

P

i

FOR RENT

111

CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B

In JGP, women are men ...
In Union Opera's "FROGGY BOTTOM", men are women ...
In conservative "GRAND ILLUSION" the status quo is
maintained!
*ept Cinemlquean AVC
Presenti
JEAN (Pepe Le Moko) GABiN
PIERRE (FANNY) FRESNAY
ERICH (THE BEAST OF BERLIN) VON STROHEIM
in
THE GREATEST OF ALL ANTI-WAR FILMS
(UNEXPURGATED)

_ _ ._._.

I!

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WOMMUMBA

TODAY
Saturday and Sunday
Continuous Daily From 1:30. P.M.

r~6
COMPLETE
DINNER
only 75c
DESSERT
and BEVERAGE
INCLUDED
(No Extra Charge)
LUNCH SPECIAL
Soup -- Sol

Cinema Triumphs.
From All Nations

ORPEUM 1

2045 Packard Road

-

RAN

Plastic Waterproof Headscarves
for $1.00 In white only.
COUSINS
on State St.

)1

t ,MAX McLAUGHLIN
' presents a
DIZZYI
::. GILLESPIE
JAZZ CONCERT
T m. jmLQ

ILLU5te
ACCLAIM
N.Y. film critics award as
"film of year"!
'I loved 'Grand illusion'."
--Helen Hayes
"It is thrilling; it is dramatic;
it is intelligent."
-World Telegram
"A savage power which one rarely
finds on the screen."
.---H.Y. lHcrcld-Tribune

El

MASH NOTES
"Jean Gabin-He's terrific"
-Katherine Hepburn
"What an orgy"
-Helen Hayes
"Gabin is the McCoy"
-Cecilia Ager, N.Y. Star

A

N

S

I

"Would any American actress
to work with him? Would
Just ask any of them,
-Irene Thirer, N.Y.

care
she?
Pu'A-

" ,5.

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. , .. , . w . ., .. . M .. s

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