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March 22, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

.. . . .... .. ..-..

No"

PSYC HOLOGISTS MEET:
Charge Loyalty Boards
Disregard Civil Rights

The American Psychological As-
sociation charged that some local
boards checking loyalty of gov-
ernment workers are neglecting
"the basic civil rights of Ameri-
cans."
The charge was made in a tele-
gram sent by Association direc-
'U' Students
Rally Against
Ickes Attack
Editorial Supports
Conservation Policy
Forestry students have come to
the defense of the U.S. Forest
Service, which was recently criti-
cized in a syndicated article by
Harold L. Ickes, former Secretary
of the Interior.
Ickes charged that the Forest
Service is more of a threat to tree
conservation than a protection.
His accusations were based on an-
nouncement that certain areas of
California timber are to be har-
vested for timber rather than pre-
served for scenic and recreational
purposes.
MR. ICKES SEEMS to have
overlooked the fact that the For-
est Service was one of the earliest
to advocate sustained yield man-
agement instead of a clear cut-
and-get-out policy," an editorial
in the "Timber Cruiser," news-
letter published by the Foresters
Club, points out. "He seems also
.to have overlooked the fact that
the nation cannot get along with-
out large supplies of wood prod-
ucts of all types."
The National Park Service is
dedicated to the preservation of
scenic areas for posterity, and
foresters generally approve of
this purpose, the editorial con-
tinues. However, "there is a
limit to the number of areas
which can be set aside for purely
aesthetic values. The Forest
Service is dedicated to the most
good to the greatest number of
people through wise use of for-
est resources," the editorial
notes.
Writer of the student editorial
was McClain Smith, graduate stu-
dent in forestry.
He criticized Ickes' "unqualified
attack on the Forest Service." The
conservation job of teaching and
practicing wise land use is hard
enough without the additional
task of trying to explain such mis-
leading statements as those of
Ickes' the editorial continues.
i] n

tors to President Truman. The di-
rectors met last weekend in Ann
Arbor.
* * *
THE TELEGRAM charged that
in particular instances, people
have been accused with only vague
charges against them and have
been assumed to be disloyal until
they could prove themselves loyal.
It further charged that events
in certain places endanger re-
tention and recruitment of qual-
ified psychologists in govern-
ment positions.
Two steps were suggested in the
message to alleviate the situation.
* * *
ONE IS AN examination of the
practice of a small number of lo-
cal loyalty boards about which
complaints have arisen.
The second step is the issu-
ance of statements to the local
boards which would clarify the
true intent of the executive or-
der which created the boards.
One of the Association's ten di-
rectors was Prof. Theodore M.
Newcomb, of the psychology and
sociology departments.
* * *
TEXT OF THE telegram, in
part, follows:
"Executive order 9835 (which
established the boards) has the
clearly justifiable intention of
averting damage to the United
States by agents or adherents
of potential enemy nations. Its
operation in many localities has
been characterized by care and
discretion. . . .
"In some other localities, how-
ever, the execution . . . appears to
neglect the basic civil rights of
Americans and is detrimental to
the morale of loyal persons in gov-
ernment service.
"We believe the undesirable
features of the present situation
would be alleviated by the follow-

ing steps. . ...
"1. A careful
correction when
practices being
small number of
cerning which
arisen.

examination and
necessary of the
followed by the
local boards con-
complaints have

G 7o/

/

eurrent rate on
insured savings
Extra earnings on Bonus
Savings Accounts

"2. The issuance of statements
to local loyalty boards clarifying
the true intent of Executive Order
9835."
Michigan
Story.. .
(Continued from Page 1)
resolution called for the admission
of any person possessing "the req-
uisite literary and moral qualifi-
cations." Miss Stockwell imme-
diately suffered through the en-
trance exams, and became Mich-
igan's first woman student.
Surviving reports have it that
she succeeded admirably, de-
spite being completely cold-
shouldered and subjected to cer-
tain untoward banter from a
fuddy-duddy faculty and a
pompous male student body.
Acting President Frieze subse-
gently noted Miss Stockwell's ex-
cellent record while she was at
Kalamazoo College, and began to
question generally the whole sys-
tem of University entrance ex-
aminations. Under his initiative,
students were finally admitted di-
rectly from accredited high
schools.
On the dark side of the Frieze
record, it appeared that the stu-
dent body was running somewhat
wild-engaging, for example, in
violent class rushes or freshman-
sophomore battles. Acting Presi-
dent Frieze, somewhat piqued by
the inadequacy of his status, told
critics that the condition could be
remedied only by a permanent
chief executive.
James Burrill Angell arrived in
June, 1871.

Dr. Conant
To Speak at
Convocation
'U' Will Honor
High Scholarship
Dr. James Bryant Conant,
President of Harvard University,
will speak at the University's an-
nual Honors Convocation of April
29.
More than 1,000 students will be
honored at the convocation for
scholastic achievement. The meet-
ing, which will be open to the
public, will also be a feature of
the Michigan Schoolmasters Club,
which will be in session at the Uni-
versity April 28 and 29.
* * *
DR. CONANT, a distinguished
scientist as well as educator, will
speak on the subject "Skepticism
and Courage in the Modern
World." He will also speak before
a meeting of Phi Beta Kappa on
the topic, "Understanding Sci-
ence."
The author of a recently pub-
lished book, "Education in a Di-
vided World," Dr. Conant is tak-
ing a leading part in current dis-
cussions of the responsibilities
and methods of modern educa-
tion. He has been a member of
the faculty of Harvard since
1916 and president of the insti-
tution since 1933.
As a chemist, President Conant
has held positions as chairman of
the National Defense Research
Committee, early in the war, and
as a scientific director of the
Rockefeller Institute since 1930. In
addition to his recent volume on
.education, he is the author of sev-
eral chemistry texts and of "Our
Fighting Faith."
SRA Group
Will Present
Film Series
The Film Study Group of the
Student Religious Association will
begin a three weeks series of films
of several decades ago Wednesday
at Lane Hall.
The programs will be presented
at 7:30 on the Wednesdays of
March 23 and 30, and April 12 and
20.
THE FIRST program will fea-
ture the development of the narra-
tive. Short movies to be shown
will include: "The Execution of
Mary Queen of Scots," "Washday
Troubles," "A Trip to the Moon,"
and "Queen Elizabeth."
The rise of the American film
will be spotlighted at the March
30 program. Listed for showing
are two movies, "The Last of
the Line" and "Civilization.
"Fragment of an Empire," a
Russian directed film, will be
shown on April 13 and "The Thief
of Bagdad," on April 20.
Clayton Bredt heads the groups
which was organized last month
under the Social and Recreation
Department at Lane Hall.
-,_

COMPLETE
DINNER
only 75c
DESSERT
and BEVERAGE
INCLUDED
(No Extra Charge)
LUNCH SPECIAL
Soup - Salad
Beverage and Dessert

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