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March 17, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__________________THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Former Olivet Coeds Tell of
Strife's Effect on Students

GOVERNOR'S WIFE HERE:

Recalls First Meeting with 'Soapy'

*.?

*

By JIM BROWN
All was not peace and quiet for
students at strife-ridden little
Olivet College last semester.
Terming the school "one huge
political camp" Bobbie Setlow, '50,
and Polly Kay, '51, both say they
are glad that they transferred to
the University this semester. Both
added, however, that "we wouldn't
Brumm Says
U.S. PublicIs
Ill-Informed
The American public is not re-
ceiving the complete news picture
through the columns of today's
newspapers, Prof. Emeritus John
L. Brumm told a journalism lec-
ture audience yesterday.
Newspaper editors too often
print only what they feel the pub-
lic should know and thus restrict
the freedom of the press by their
own actions, Prof. Brumm said.
The public is frequently denied
the opportunity to consider cer-
tain ideas because they are alien
to the thinking of many news-
paper editors, he continued.
This self-imposed restriction of
the freedom of the press, accord-
ing to Prof. Brumm, is just as
serious as government censorship.
Paradoxically, the framer's of
the Constitution actually limited
the freedom of the press in their
efforts to secur that end, he point-
ed out, because the founding fath-
ers expected that newspapers

have missed the experience for
anything."
EMPHASIZING that it was al-
most impossible to study at all,
both girls said that they got very
little out of the semester academ-
ically. "We used to sit up until all
hours every night arguing the is-
sue instead of studying," said Miss
Setlow.
"Even our classes were dis-
rupted since some professors
conducted broad discussions on
the issue," she added.
Pointing out that the students
were split as well as the faculty-
some siding with the 15 ousted
faculty members and others sup-
porting the adninistration-the
two girls said that the situation
was pretty tense at times. "The
arguments often became rather
bitter and each group almost
shunned eachother," declared
Miss Kay.
BOTH GIRLS felt that the un-
certainty of the situation was the
most nerve-wracking part of the
semester. "We never knew whether
the school would close immedi-
ately or if our credits would be ac-
cepted at other schools," said(Miss
Kay.!
When asked what they thought
the fate of the school would be the
two girls again expressed differ-
ing opinions. Asserting that Olivet
has lost the ideals which it upheld
when she entered two years ago,
Miss Setlaw said, "I think it will
fold or deteriorate in June."
Miss Kay, however, felt that the
school would survive the current
strife. "I have too much faith in

By MARY STEIN
"I was engaged to a fellow from
St. Louis-but my sorority sisters
wouldn't let me sit home.''
"So they got me a blind date,
and he turned out to be Soapy."
MRS. G. MENNEN Williams was
telling me how she met her hus-
band in 1935, when both were
students at the University.
The Governor's wife, in this
part of the state for a few days,
was guest of honor at a facultyf
wives' tea at the Ruthven home
yesterday. As they greeted her,
club members who knew her
"back when" helped piece out
her story.
She was sophomore Nancy Quirk
then. Determined to be true to
her fiance, she had decided to
spend the weekend ofs abig spring
dance at home In "Ypsilanti.
BUT HER SOROSIS sisters
wouldn't hear of it, and St. Louis
was far away. So they finally
talked Nancy into taking a blind
date.
le was a law junior named G.
Mennen Williams-"Soapy" to
his college friends.
Evidently he plead his romantic
case well on that first date, for
two years and one broken engage-
ment later, tall, vivacious Nancy
Quirk became Mrs. G. Mennen
Williams.
* * *
ONE CLUB MEMBER remei.n-
bered the ceremony-"it was aI
lovely lawn service," she recalled.

Teaehiiig Job
Applications
Method Cited
Getting a 'job as a teacher is
the same as getting any other
kind of job, Dr. T. Luther Pur-
dom, director of the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational
Information, said said last night.
Speaking on "Securing a Teach-
ing Position" in the fifth of a
series of weekly public lectures
sponsored by the education school,
Purdom said the thing to do is
be smart, be decent and do some-
thing for yourself."
ITHE BUREAU of Appointments
does not tell people whom to hire
or what position to accept, Pur-
dom pointed out. Its task is pure-
ly one of giving information, he
said.
And he explained that treating
a prospective employer with re-
spect is important no matter how
well qualified you are. The most
important thing is to show initia-
tive, Purdom said.
Bat o Speak
Ojn ChIld Study

?rjonal/QzcGIFTS

- 1--- _____________ _I,

GIVE THE ADDED TOUCH
THA T MEANS SO MUCH
We Pirinl/ i;,iud/s or !i;c) ion

MATCHES

COASTERS

STIRRING RODS

PEN CILS

f
i
I
! il

PLAYING CARDS

NAPKINS

STATIONERY

RRMSPY- CRNFIELD
I nc o r r a/ cd
-'ng ers . . . PIRINTERS . .S;tationers
119 East Libcrty Plhonc 7900

RE-VISITS COLLEGE SCENE
1937 graduate of the University
Faculty Wives' tea held at th
Williams was guest of honor att
FrenchlN ovi.

Daly-Tyson
S-Mrs. G. Mennen Williams, a
y, greets Ann Arbor friends at a
e Ruthven home yesterday. Mrs.
the event.,
e To Be Shown
dealing with current social prob-
lems.
t Hans Eisler has done the mu-
sical score of the film, and the
cast includes Jean-Pierre Au-
trays the lives of poverty stricken I
boys' gangs in Paris.

"Learning from Children" will
be discussed by Prof. William
Blatu of the University of Toron-
to at 2 p.m. tomorrow in Rackham
lecture hall.
Prof. Blatz will address the
education school's 14thi annual
convocation to honor students
planning teaching careers. His
talk will also form part of the
annual Washtenaw County Teach-
ers, Institute.
Prof. Blatz is director of the
Institute of Child Study at the
University of Toronto and con-
sultant to the juvenile court clinic
of Toronto . _- _

Read and Use Daily Classifiedd s
You Ve seen New York's "Dead End Kids", Rome's "Shoeshine" Boys
now see PARISIAN toughies who are really TOUGH!
"SONG
OF THE ST EmnET"

'0

would always attempt to print all the present
the news if given the liberty to do think that it
SO. said.

administration
,will collapse,"

to
she

FRIDAY, MARCH 18
D)ANCING
at the
KOMO KATERI NG KLUB
2 Great Bands
NORMAN BROWN & His Orchestra
and
HUGH JACKSON & His "Uptown 6"

NSA To Close
Travel Bureau
Hesitant students must decide
their summer travel plans today
-if they want to make use of
NSA's Travel Bureau, 1010 Ad-
ministration Building.
Today is the last day of Bureau
operations, ending three weeks of
service to students hoping to
travel abroad on NSA and other
travel plans. The bureau will be
open from 4 to 4:45 p.m., Sue
Sirus, '50, chairman of Bureau
sub-committee, announced.
Information and applications
for National Student Association
tours and work-camps in Europe
and other areas of the world will
be ready for the last-minute trav-

"Song of the Street," a French
film with English titles, will be
shown at 8 p.m. today, and 7 and
9, p.m. tomorrow and Saturday at
the Architecture Auditorium.
The picture is the first in a
series of three films sponsored by
Students for Democratic Action

'U' Fraternities Accept 298 Pledges

$1,00 per Person
(tax inc.)

Formerly Smith's Catering
834 Greene Street

'"1

eler.
UN

The DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH presents
"4TOVABICH"

SPARKLING COMEDY
by Jacques Deval
ENGLISH ADAPTATION
by Robert E. Sherwood
THURS. TH RU SAT. - 8 P.M.

=.ny

(Continued from Page 1)
Morse, George Roberts, James
Watkins.
KAPPA NU: Kenneth Adler,
Ralph Coskey, Julian Daly, Jack
Lipson, Morris Peltz, William
Rothman, Mark Sandground.
KAPPA SIMGA: John Keffrey,
John Merow, Anthony Palermo,
John Piazza, Christoph Schneider,
Alfred Silverberg, Clarke Steven-
son, Robert Van Arsdol, James
Lindsay.
LAMBDA CIII ALPHA: John
Box, James Fish, Richard Foster,
Donald Greiner, Thomas Healy,
Swight Heim, George Inman,
Harry Miller, Harry Mosher, Al-
phonsus Murphy, Richard Reed,
Bruce Sodee, Richard Yarmain,
Harold Zigmanth.
Pl'hI GAMMA DELTA: Richard
Day, Richard Frame, John Kathe,
Parker Pennington, Richard
Thomas.
Pill KAPPA PSI: Richard Bak-
er, John Beger, John Buckley,
William Eggenberger, Ned Mac
Williams, Thomas Mills, Jr., Dave
Settle.
PIll KAPPA SIGMA: Bruce
Coulter, Donald Dr Vries, John
Farncy, James Kaser, .J'mes Maur-
er, Frank Miller, Jr., Hugh Parker,
Peter Randolph, William Rohring,
Gordon Stewart, Charles Stowe,
Robert Wagner.
PIlI KAPPA TAU: Donald
Brown, Richard Ciheney, Davis
Crippcn, Conrad lEtt, Charles
Good, 'I homas Grala m, Janics
Kciper, Richard Knape, John Le-
valley, Robert Lewis, Jr., Frank
Pauly, Robert Ridgway, Russell
Wcpfcr.
Pjil LAMBDA Pill: Norman
j Axelrod, Richard Krinsley, Hugh
IcGreenberg.
Pill SIGMA DELTA: Donald
Berns. Ernest Brookfield, Herbert
Cohen, Maurice Forbes, Kenneth
Gorson, Irving Goldberg, Charles
Karp, Seymour Muskovitz, Jules

PHI UPSILON: Tony Bandyk, ert Hoexter, Ivan Kaufman,
Stewart Elliott, Henry Roesch, Thomas Much, Jay Pike. .
Robert Ross. TAU DELTA I'hI: Ira Albion,
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: Da- Sheldon Labret, Joel Meltzer, Da-
vid Bell, Francis Gabel, Justin vid Oestreich.
Geyer, Paul Gikas, Jack Hachi- TRIANGLE: Donald Firth, Her-
gan, Hjalmar Johnson, William bert Gold, James Hood, Gerald
Keith, Lyle LaPine, Eugene Les- Jarosik, Louis Rotolo.
sieu, Harold Pink, Charles Pin-,
son, Robert Sheridan, Kenneth THETA CHI: George Cameron,
Shireling, Stanley Steinkamp, Richard Dreese.,John Mowitt,
Ralph Stribe, Charles Thomas, Stanley Tangalakis.
Robert Underhill, Thomas Upton, THETA DELTA CHI: Richard
David Williams, Donald Zanfagna. Kamrath, Melvin Kordenbrock,
SIGMA ALPHA MU: William Dewayne Phillips, Zeph Phillips.
Altman, Richard Ehrenberg, Har- THETA XI: Dale Bock, Andrew
vey Gordenker, Henry Gtreens- Boris, James Chalmers, Clifford
pahn, Victor Hurwitz, Bernard Farrington, Gerald Fox, Donald
Kahn, Burton Kampner, Charles Hall, Jack Hamer, Jack Hulburd,
Kauffman, Edwin Kornblue, Bar- Richard Johnso, Elmer Lang, Da-
ton Mann, Martin Packard, Lewis vid Leddick, Robert Mitchell, Rob-
Pollock, Milton Rosenbaum, Je-1 etr Niehaus, David O'Brien, Don-
rome Schafer, Leon Schekter, ald Olivier, Gordon Sakstrup, Rob-
Melvin Schwartz, Jerome Segal, ert Shanahan, William Taylor,
Harvey Taterka, Bruce Thal. Robert Vincent, Edwin Willis.

Perlberg, Hebert Ruben, Norman
Siegel.
PHI SIGMA KAPPA: Thomas
Kristofferson, James Knox, Alec
Currie, Richard Beers, Arthur
Lane.
* * *'

3

Ross Phal'graff. Walter Roth,
Robert Schmidt, Glen Spade, Rob-
ert Warrilow, Robert Wilson, Louis
Wirbel, Jack Zerull.
TRIGON: Lee Boboltz, James,
Christiansen, Francis Dalton, Rob-

"ThE FRENCH CALL A
SPADE A SPADE . . .
These Parisian toughies
could teach our Dead End
Kids a thing about acting,
and a thing about being
tough."
"ROMANTIC REALISM ..
hegihtened by . . . beau-
tiful photography and
Hanns Eiler's symphonic
score .. .
-Trancelike ...bizarre
. . . UNUSUAL CINEMA
IMAGINATION."

DANS LES RUES * ENGLISH TITLES
A Iilm of unsaI beauty
am social meanlt/g
CAMPUS PREMIERE
TON ITE, 8 P.M.
Two shows Friday & Saturday
7 and 9 P.M., March 18 and 19

N

CRITICS SAY;

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
First in a SOCIAL ISSUES CINEMA SERIES sponsored by the
Students for Democratic Action, U. of M. Chapter

- ..,
p ..s

Sat. Matinee 2:30 P.M.
March 24, 25, 26
Tickets 1.20, 90c, 60c (tax inc.)

..

SPECIAL RATE for STUDENTS
Thursday Evening and Saturday Matinee - 48c
Box Office Opens March 21, Mail Orders Now!
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER,

SIGMA CIII: Joseph Beet, Wil-
liam Doyle, Wilbert Flascher, Paul
Grubbs, Charles Hattaway, Rob-
ert Heathcott, Edward Keough,
Paul Rodenbeck, Fredrick Thomp-
son, Leo VanderKuy, Richard
Williams.
SIGMA NU: Dante Archangeli,
Paul Bagrow, John Barrows, John
Bedford, James Bologna, Donald
Downie, Robert Ford, William Je-
weill, Carroll Leedy, Alexander
Popp, Lee Robinson, James Scog-
gin, William Thompson.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Rich-
arcd Boonstra, William Burkett,
Claude Crawford, Liberato D'Ad-j
dona, Robert Franc, Jack Gillett,
Gene Gilmore, Lawrence Gray,
Harry Hillman, Donald Jacques,
Arthur Knorst, Leonard Martin,
Richard Martin, Lowell Modlin,
William Morris, Nelson Merrill, I
Harold Niemeyer, Frank Palazzolo,

ZETA BETA TAU: Sumner
Fliedman, Donald Harris, Stuart
Florwich, Frederick Keidan, Leon
Reiskin, Norman Pivkees, Stanley
Weinberger.
ZETA PSI: Joseph Dean, Clarke
Goethal.
]1
O ypf n II dI
Offi con I Portable tModels
of al rn ak
Sold,
Renited
STATIONE Y & SU PPLIES
G. 1. IuIi rAcepted
0. 9. I M RILL
314 South Stari t.

qarfOgye 4

I

t CITY EDITION
ncreaIng cloudiness tofafy
Intermittent rain tomorrow.
TeinperatuveRaag.Today-Maz.,4G;
Teemperatures Yetrdaw- a
es7AnU V.S. W*Mbar r a
Prepare Yourself for
the Rainy Season Ahead
WITH THIS FINE RAINCOAT
April showers or September showers are all
the same to you in this fine rayon gabar-
dine coat. Its processing keeps you snugly

SECOND ANNUAL

i _ __ - - a

The
NION OPERA
PRESENT S
I's 29th Musical Comedy
~Foggy Bottom

7 ' I

BLOODYPUL
wo

dry through the hardest downpour,

It

Itarch 23, 24, 25

8: t{J

I

Barring an Act of God and two acts
vnstalI nthokritics (Act of 1797 anda

/* 1 - - c

I

Act

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