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March 15, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-15

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THIE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 1949

UNINHIBITED ARTISTRY:
Kiddies Craft Displayed at Rackham
By ROSALIND VIRSHIP
Potential Rembrandts and Pi-
cassos among the local grade
school set are getting their artis- *
tic creations recognized at an early
age ,
The walls of three 'rooms in the
Rackham Building are currently%
covered with the works of Ann Ar-
bor tots in the annua'l exhibit of
Child Art.
UNHAMPERED BY rigid rules :
of drawing and painting, the -f
youngstersphave givenfreedreinto
their imaginations. They haven't
even bothered to stick to the con-
ventional paint brush and drawing
pencil, as a matter of fact.
Colored paper and paste weref
the tools of several. One infant
non-conformist made use of s
mother's bright red nail polish
to convey her artistic message.
And when they picked their sub-
ject matter-well, a psychologistf.}
might go on an analytical spree
when he was confronted with the
evidences of tiny-tot expression at{
Rackham.
THE YOUNGSTERS have not '
restricted themselves to any one
school of art, if they've ever heard
about them. But traces of every-
thing from traditionalism to im-
pressionism, cubism, non-objec-
tivism and surrealism can be
found in their art. }:

World Government Plan
Pro posed by Farmer

Plans for a "federal world gov-
ernment toabolish war by law"
were brought to Ann Arbor last
weekend by Fyke Farmer,iNash-
ville, Tenn., attorney, who is cam-
paigning for a World Constitutent
Convention to be held in the fall
of 1950 at Geneva, Switzerland.
Speaking to the campus United
World Federalists Farmer, the
author of the proposal, outlined
his plan whereby 131 American
delegates, chosen on the basis of
one per million population, would
represent the United States at a
world convention.
EVERY STATE, including the
District of Columbia, would have
at least one representative, ac-
cording to Farmer's project. Elec-
tion of American delegates would
have to depend, however, upon au-
thorization of the movement by
individual state legislatures, and
would resemble the U.S. electoral
college system, he pointed out.
All nations would be invited to
send delegates chosen on the
same basis of population repre-
sentation, according to the plan.
The Tennessee lawyer first for-
Theatre Guild
H4olds Ballot

mulated his ideas in June, 1948.
and succeeded the following Jan-
uary in persuading state lawmak-
ers to push introduction of a bill
into Tennessee's legislature. After
passing the second reading in both
state houses, it was endorsed by
Governor Gordon Browning who
pledged his "full support."
IF IT POLLS the final vote at
the Tennessee legislature's recon-
vention March 21, World Govern-
ment and the election of Tennes-
see's three delegates will be includ-
ed on the regular election ballot
in August, 1950, he said.
Farmer recently sent letters
to President Truman and Soviet
Prime Minister Josef Stalin,
asking support of the proposed
world assemblies.
State Department officials ac-
knowledged receipt of the letter,
claiming they didn't "consider the
plan feasible at this time." "But
I received no reply from Stalin;
in fact, the letter was sent right
back to me," he reported.

Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
NSA-Meeting of students plan-
ning to petition for NSA delegate
to national convention, 4 p.m.,
Rm. 3D, Union.
Ordnance ROTC -New Auto-
motive trouble-shooting group to
meet, 7 p.m., West Engineering
Laboratory.
EVENTS TOMORROW
Occupational Information Con-
ference--Vick Chemical Co. and
Eli Lilly pharmaceutical company
representatives to discuss job op-
portunities under sponsorship of
Bureau of Appointments, 410
p.m., 231 Angell Hall.
Education Lecture-T. Luther
Purdom, director of Bureau of
Appointments to speak on "Secur-
ing a Teaching Position," 7 p.m.
University High School Audito-
rium.
Emeritus John L. Bruim to give
third in series, 3 p.m., Rm. B
Haven Hall.
Race Relations talk-John Field
of Detroit Inter-Racial Committee
to discuss "Strategy of Better
Race Relations," 8 p.m., League.

THIRTY CANDLES:
Legion Celebrates Founding,
Will Name Citizen-of-the-Year

Today will be a red-letter day
for American Legion men all the
way from Maine to California as
they join in celebrating the thir-
tiethanniversary of the Legion's
birth.,
Founded in Paris, France, on
March 15, 1919, the Legion is
planning a series of celebrations
throughout the country this week
in honor of its birthday.
'WAY BACK IN the Kaiser's
day, fighting men of the AEF held
an organizational caucus in the
Cirque de Paris. From this meet-
ing emerged the embryo of one of
the largest veteran's groups in
the United States.

Ann Arbor Legionnaires all day
Thursday. The program will
teature the awarding of a cita-
tion to Ann Arbor's outstand-
ing citizen of 1948. Identity
of the city's first citizen will be
made public durinig the pro-
gram, which will be followedrby
a dance.
Named the Erwin Prieskorn
Post, after the first Ann Arborite
to lose his life in World War I,
the local post was the 48th U.S.
chapter to receive an official
charter. Since its founding, the
Legion has established posts in
more than 11,300 communities.
The Ann Arbor chapter dedicat-
ed its present home, behind the
Michigan Stadium, early in 1948
under the title of Cannon-Huff
Auditorium

In
sion,
Post

honor of the festive occa-
the local Erwin Prieskorn
is planning a party for

-

MAX McLAUGHLIN

presents a
DIZZY

Subject matter runs the
gamut from the tot's dream of
candyland to goo-goo eyes,
shmoos, lines and spots, the
"main drag" and fuzzy-lined pink
elephants.
One landscape scene, marked by
swirling skies, might prove con-
fusing to Van Gogh collectors.
And Rembrandt's "Self Por -
trait" has probably never been dis-
played to better advantage than is
the portrait of a pig-tailed, frec-
kle-faced miss.
PROSPECTS FOR the next
generation of art critics in Ann

Daily-Lmanian
IT'S UPSIDE DOWN-Judy Engel, six, has only one complaint
as she points to her abstract painting hanging in the Children's
Art Exhibit at Rackham. The picture will be righted when it is
rehung after the exhibit closes, in the office of her father, Prof.
Edwin A. Engel, Rm. 2200 A.H. who will use it to inspire his
English students.
* * * *

Arbor don't quite match those of .
the artists.
At least a group of nursery
school moppets who came to
view the exhibit showed a no-
ticeable lack of interest. The
wide-open spaces of the galler-
ies distracted them from the
works of art, and the babes
raced through the rooms, play-

ing tag and "horsey," rolling on
the floors and shouting merrily.
However, one little fellow was
visibly impressed by a surrealistic
offering. As he backed away from
the painting, head cocked to one
side and eyebrow raised, he uttered
a phrase echoed by many an adult
unschooled in modern art: "What
is it?"

By making use of the ballot
which the University Theatre
Guild will publish in The Daily to-
morrow and Friday, students may
designate the play they would
most like t.o see the local thespians
produce.
The ballot will list four plays-
"Beyond the Horizon" by Eugene
O'Neill, "Winterset" by Maxwell
Anderson, Henrik Ibsen's "Hedda
Gabler," and Clifford Odets'
"Awake and Sing."
Two blank spaces will also be
furnished in which students will
be able to write in a play other
than those listed plus their choice
of a Shakespearean drama that
the Guild might present in the
future.
Ballot boxes will be placed in
the lobbies of Angell Hall, the
League and the Union.

GILLESPIE
JAZZ CONCERT
Tuesday, March 29
8-11 P.M.
Tickets on sale at
your favorite record shop
All Seats Reserved
$2.00 tax included

Take a Fling at
LIFE
Special college subscription rate
$4.75 Per Year
Save $ 5.65 over news stand prices.
COLLEGE RATES also available
for TIME and FORTUNE.
Prompt action on address charges.
Student Periodical Agency
225 East Liberty
We'll bill you... 2-82-42
To order just phone

c

PATTENG LL AUDITORIUM

Ann Arbor High School

Modern Works
On Exhibition
An exhibition of forty 20th cen-
tury drawings from the collection
of New York's Museum of Modern
Art opened yesterday in the Uni-
versity's Museum of Art in Alumni
Memorial Hall.
The drawings have been select-
ed from a comprehensive collec-
tion of contemporary creations
owned by the Museum of Modern
Art.
"Some magnificent examples of
drawings by many of the leading
figures in the art of our times
are included in the exhibition, ac-
cording to Prof. Jean Paul Slusser,
director of the University's mu-
seum.
Actuarial Club
Elects Officers
Aditya Prakasia, 49Grad., has
been elected president of the Uni-
versity Actuarial Club, organiza-
tion for mathematics students.
Other officers include Robert
Meredity, Grad., secretary; and
Vincent Lowenber, '49, treasurer.

STUDENTS OFFER SUPPORT:,
New Groups Unite To Fight
Discrimination onCampus

The fight against discrimina-
tion continues to gain new sup-
port among campus groups.
Betsy Barbour and Jordan Hall
are the newest additions to the
Committee to End Discrimination
which now boasts twelve campus
organizations as official members
and six groups who have sent ob-
servers but have not as yet joined
officially.
*. * *
ORGANIZED as a sub-commit-
tee of the Inter-Racial Association
pending recognition by the Stu-
dent Affairs Committee as a sep-
arate entity, the committee has
as its purpose the "coordination,
integration, and initiation of ac-
tion against discrimination," ac-
cording to Leon Rechtman, chair-
man of the group.
Special studies of the possi-
bility of discrimination in em-
ployment of faculty and regular
school employes as well as the
possible use of quotas in ad-
mission to undergraduate and

professional schools will be un-
dertaken by the group.
A sub-committee was estab-
lished to investigate the progress
of the bill to end discrimination
in Michigan schools soon to be
up for discussion at Lansing, and
to consider the possibilities of
helping the passage of the bill.
* * *
INCLUDED AS official members
of the committee are Students for
Democratic Action, Veterans Com-
mittee, Inter-Racial Association,
Inter-Cooperative Couincil, New
Women's Residence Hall and the
United World Federalists.

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