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March 11, 1949 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-11

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FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 1949

.W- - I
PAr.T' c4vvrv

THE 311CH IGAN DAILY

TT1I MTCTTGN nATY AflW E~1 = a~~ _.

[ [iUL OLYLPI

I

JUST KIBJITZING
By PRES HOLMES, Sports Night Editar
ANOTHER HECTIC Conference season is now history, but the one
just passed did more than merely witness the crowning of a new
basketball champion.
Two interesting and provocative issues were also brought into the
spotlight as the year progressed. The first was that a Negro played a
full season in the Big Nine; and the second concerned the controversy
about control basketball, which was discussed with renewed vigor and
vehemence almost every week-after another coach regarded himself
as the victim of it.
*, y
INQUIRIES WERE MADE to various colleges and universities
and the data gathered will be presented in a series of two articles.
Today's story deals with the situation of the Negro in Big Nine
'asketball.
Bill Garrett, flashy center for the Indiana basketball team, is
the first Negro to play a full season for any Big Nine team.
He is not, however, cited as the first one of his race to play in Big
Nine circles. Iowa had a Negro, Dick Culberson, on their 1944-45 and
45-46 squads and he played in a total of four and two games, respec-
tively, during the Conference seasons.
BEFORE THEIR RESIGNATION from the Big Ten, Chicago used
a Negro, who incidentally played against Culberson in 1946. Michigan'
had its representative in 1945 when Len Ford played in a few games
for the Wolverines. None of these men, however, worked a full season.
Garrett's record proves that Coach Branch McCracken was
more than justified in using him. In 12 Conference games the
Hoosier center racked up 122 points to place fifteenth in the Big
Nine and take top scoring honors for Indiana. He made 220
during the whole season.
The fact that the color of his skin was different from that of his
teammates' made no difference to them, and likewise it should be no
reason to single him out from anyone else whose record deserved just
as much attention.
UT, ON THE OTHER HAND, his case does warrant mention for it
may be the step that will break down the color barrier which
seems to exist in Conference basketball.
Out of nine major sports generally recognized by the Big
Nine, Negroes are really active in only two: football and track.
The major difficulty seems to focus on the fact that there is some
kind of a barrier, discriminatory in nature, which accounts for the
lack of Negroes in Conference athletics.
e * *
THERE HAS BEEN DISCUSSION as to whether or not Ford,
Culberson, and others who didn't work at all, were good enough to
play a full season. Some people have commented that Ford was a very
good player and this fact seems to be substantiated by the fact that he
toured with a semi-pro outfit for a while.
However, this brings to light the angle which is impossible to
check. A player could be really great and yet the final decision
would be up to the coach whether or not he would play, and thus
could prevent a Negro from seeing action. This idea seems rather
hard to swallow.
The question of team morale unfortunately plagues a cage coach
when he is confronted with the problem of a Negro star. If three or
four of the other members refuse to play because a Negro is on the
team, then it would be logical to diop the one man in favor of the
larger number.
ROOMING ON ROAD TRIPS, -accommodations which some hotels
refuse to give, and other similar difficulties that might arise seem to
be the present reasons offered for preventing a Negro from playing.
If Garrett and the Indiana situation is any criterion, then
there should be no difficulty along these lines. He has been com-
pletely and enthusiastically accepted by both fans and teammates.
As far as hotels were concerned, Indiana had no difficulty in any
way in securing the same first-class accommodations it always
had.
Cage fans may have witnessed the crumbling of another bit of
seeming prejudice in Big Nine athletics this past season.
Now that the ice seems to have been definitely broken it shouldn't
be long before the best athletes, regardless of the color of their skin,
will be playing on all the varsity squads of all the Conference schools.

ukmen Meet Sarnia in Season Final

'M' Fencers
Place High
lit State Tit
P~ete Yotiiig Ses
Woix cr1 iic Pavce
Showingtun expected (Ipower,
Michigan's Scimitar Club fencers
completely dominated the State
Junior Foil Championships held
Sunday. March 6th in Detroit.
Michigan entered five fencers!
three of which were able to garner
places in the first five.
YETE: YOUNG finished second,
barely missing the crown as hie
lost to James Campoli of Law-
rence Tech by the bare margin of
one touch. Andy Turner and Art
Wright took fourth and fifth
places respectively.
This meet, sponsored by the
Amateur Fenicer's League of
America attracted entries from
five colleges and Universities
in the state in addition to the
Scimitar Club's entry.
Lawrence Tcch, University of
Detroit, Michigan State. Wayne
and Highland Park Junior Collegel,
were all well represented.'
This match served as a fore-
runner to the next big fencing
event in the state, the Intercol-I
legiate Three Weapon champion-
ships which are to be held on
March 19th in Ann Arbor under
the auspices of the Scimitar Club.
SUNI)AY'S TWO TOP foil men,
Campoli and Young will be seen
in action against each other and
Young expressed the hope that
he might be able to reverse the
previous decision, at practice yes-
terday.
This competition will also
feature an exhibition between
two of the nations foremost
fencers, Byron Krieger and Bela
De Tuscan.
Krieger, a member of Salle de
Tuscan of Detroit is ranked tenth
nationally, by the Amateur Fenc-
ers League. De. Tuscan is the
founider, owner and fencing mas-
ter of Salle de Tuscan which
through the years has been one of
Am'erica's top fencing clubs.
The two will be pitted in sabre
competition.
Other interesting matches will
pit Dick Yasenchek, of Lawrence
Tech third place finisher in Sun-1I
day's event against Michigan's
Andy Turner who finished. one
notch under Yasenchek.
TUXEDO and
TAILS RENTALS
ALL NEW - ALL SIZES
Locally Stocked
See
RABIWIUPARRI S
119 So. Main St. Phone 6924

Six Men Say 'Goodbye'
To Coliseum Ice Tonight

SUFFERIN' CINDERS!
Injuries Hamper 'M' Bid in IT Relays

By BOB SANDELL i
Vic Heyliger's Wolverine puck-
sters will get their last chance
to sharpen up for the defense of
heir NCAA puck title tonight,
when they meet the Sarnia Hockey
Club of Ontario at the Coliseum
ui 8:00 p.m.
If a the final home appearance
for six Wolverine aces who have
bLen instrumental in compiling
the finest record in Michigan
puck history.
THESE MEN, defensemen
Connie Hill and Dick Starrak,'
wingmen Al Renfrew and Wally
Gacek, center Gordie McMillan,
and goalie Jack McDonald form
an integral part of a team that'
has been ranked with the great-
cst college hockey squads ever as-
.sembled.
Undoubtedly the name that
will stick in the record books
the longest will be that of Me-
Millan, the flashy red-head who
has amassed a total of 204
points in his four seasons as a
Maize and Blue iceman.
Gordie has been the perennial
seoi ing leader and has estab-
lished a mark that should stand
for a long, time.
Flanking McMillan during this'
"Golden Era" of Michigan hockey
There are 200 tickets remain-
ing for tonight's hockey game
between Michigan and the
Sarnia Hockey Club. They will
go on sale at 8:00 a.m. at the
Athletic Administration Build-
ing.
has been reliable Al Renfrew who
will h'ank with the greatest Wol-
verine athletes because of his keen
competitive spirit and brilliant
team play.
With the exception of last
year, speedy little Wally Gacek
has been the other wing of this
outstanding line with Renfrew
and McMilian. Ile was one of
the heroes of last year's na-
tional tournament with five
goals and two assists in the two
crucial contests at Colorado
Springs.

Wally is third in all-time scor-
ing with a 142 total.
The defensive aggregation that
leaves this year might possibly be
missed even more than the high-
scoring trio of forwards.
Diminutive Connie Hill has
become extremely popular with
Michigan's hockey fans with his
expert poke-checking and con-
sistently fine performances.
Connie was captain of the Wol-
verines his first three seasons.
In contrast to Connie's fancy
stickwork, Dick Starrak has been
the more fiery. rugged type of.
defenseman who has thrived on.
rattling his opponents with hard
body-checks. His improved play
this year has been one of the
major reasons why the Wolverines
have tasted defeat only once in
the last 21 games.
Jack McDonald is the only
American of the group and has
been a familiar figure in the Wol-
verine crease since the beginning
of 1946. '=Mac's" play has been
almost sensational at times this
year and his departure will leave
a big gap for Heyliger to fill.
Netme iMeet
Kazoo Today
#I
Wolverine netmen will haveA
their first chance to show their
strength when they meet the court
squad of Kalamazoo at noon todayi
in the Sports Building.
Although only a practice matchI

B3y HUGH QUINN
With the season not even half
completed, Old Man Injury is al-
ready taking his toll on the Wol-
verine track squad.
Five of the varsity's front run-
ners are currently bothered with
injuries of one sort or another,
and Michigan's scoring power for
tomorrow's Illinois Tech Relays
is cut by nearly 30 points.
BIGGEST BLOW to Michigan's
hopes this year was the loss ofI
middle-distance star Herb Bar-
ten. While touring Europe with
the U. S. Olympic team last sum-
mer, Barten injured his foot, and
he hasn't been able to run an open
competitive race yet this season.
Barten was defending Big
Nine Champion in both the mile
To Face Kent
Olympic Star
Bucking up against Olympic
star, Joe Cotys .the Wolverine
gymnast team will have their
hands full when they visit Kent
State University at Kent, Ohio
next Monday.
"Cotys," Coach Newt Loken
says, "does everything." The only
field in which he does not com-
pete is the trampoline and it is
in these events that the Wolver-
ines hope to garner most of their
points.

and 880-yard rut, and Coach
Don Canham was counting on
him to score heavily in this
year's Conference meet. So
Barten laid off in the early
meets of the year, hoping the
bruise would clear up before
last week's championshi at
Champaign.
But the injury was as had as
ever, and he was forced to drop
out of the half-mile, the only race
he entered.
Another old injury which has
hung on all season is Clay Hol-
land's pulled leg muscle. Holland
was Michigan's number one hur-
dler last season: but he injured
his leg before the first meet of
the current season, and he hasn't
run the highs yet.
TWO NEW injuries popped up

last u ojk just in time to stint the
Wolverines' chances at ithe Con-
ference. Sprinter Ai't Henrie
strained a thigh muscle in prac-
tice three days before the meet.
and had to scratch from the semi-
finals of the 60-yard dash at
Champaign.
Bob Thomason iwas entered in
both the mile and half-mile,
but he was tripped in the pre-
liminaries of the 880, and get
up with two stiff knees and a
spiked foot. lie was unable to
qualify in the half-mile and
couldn't run the mile the next
day.
Quarter-miler Ron Sotle has
another one of those leg injuries
that won't go away. He first in-
jured his thigh when he was a
freshman, and he hasn't been able
to escape the jinx this year.

9ke

* fakv
-LOviiC&

WITH VIRATOL*
ers in the
our hair.
tural...
tural...
ys in *+
a bottle.
und gives lustre .., f
withost stdfness."

(

the contest will feature a clash
between Andy Paton, top man for TEN MICHIGA
Michigan, and Jack Sunderland, el to the Kent S
number one for Kalamazoo. Pat- by Captain Dick]
on, Big-Nine singles champ, took blers include B
two matches from Sunderland last Pete Barthell, J
season while losing only one to Checkley, Ed Bucr
him. However, in the Western ly Niemen.
Association ratings Sunderland is The main idea
ranked eight to Paton's rank of{I and win the me
nine. This match, scheduled to Coach Newt Lok
start about one o'clock, should be on trampoline
a. good preview of Paton's strength Schoendube, Go
this year as compared to last year! and Dave Lake
Al Hetzack, Fred Otto, Don Mc- Cotys, besides 1
Kay, Gordy Naugle, and Dick Lin- Moore's stalwarta
coln will fill the remaining not to a first placei
spots for the Wolverines. tryouts last year.

N men will trav-
State home. Led
Fashbaugh, tum-
ob Willoughby,
eff Knight, Bob
anen, and Wal-
is to stop Cotys
eet. To do this
en is depending
experts Bob
ordie Levenson,
.
being Coach Vic

NEW FORMULA V
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I:ain Vl * a alnr

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MARSHALL'S
DRUGS - COSMETICS - TOBACCOS
235 S. State St.
State Theatre Next to us
BEER, WINE, CHAMPAGNE
Prices effective Friday, Saturday
We reserve the right to limit quantities

j '111 c

i

9

an

oven

Hornets Sign
Joe Soboleski
Joe Soboleski, 205-pound Wol-
verine guard on the 1947 and
1948 title teams, signed to play
with the All-American Confer-
ence's Chicago Hornets yesterday.
Soboleski, who hails from Grand
Rapids, Michigan, stood out on
defense for two seasons here. He
originally was drafted by the
Cleveland Browns.
Soboleski first donned the Maize
and Blue's uniform in 1945 as a
sensational 17 year old find. In
the 1946 Michigan-Army game,
Soboleski twice stopped Doc Blan-
chard. great Cadet fullback, on
smashes from the one yard line.
d

I-M BASKETBALL SCORES
Theta Chi "B" 14, Trigon "B"
12.
Delta Sigma Delta :2, Phi
Epsilon Kappa 43.
Phi Chi 23, Phi Alpha Kappa
21.
Phi Delta Phi 41, Tau Epsi-
lon Rho 12.

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