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March 10, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

___ __ _...__.____ __.__.__8 ~

m

j 'kW W,/ES t12A
-70 /117-1OQET/7/ A/ &17
4SA VJQI 41
/pj'Lm M ae
Among Top TenP Scorers

NIT Selects
Five Squads
101,four e
NEW YORK --)The selec-
tion committee of the National In-
vtation Basketball Tournament
solvred a thorny problem yesterday
by adding five more teams--in-
stead of one--to make its annual
extravaganza a 12-team event in
place of the usual eight-team af-
fair.
Loyola of Chicago (22-5). Bowl-
ing Green of Ohio (21-6), and
three New York schools, Man-
hattan College (18-7), St. John's
(15-8), and New York University
(12-7), joined the seven other
quintets for the March 12-14-17-
19 tourney in Madison Square
Garden-
'lHE FIRST seven picked prev-
iously were Kentucky (29-1, St.
louis 21-3, Utah (24-7), West-
ern Kentucky (25-3), San Fran-
cisco (21-5), Bradley <25-6), and
City College of New York (17-7).
With the field increased, af-
ternoon sessions were put on the
p~rogram for this Saturday and
next Monday.
Kentucky's NCAA champions
and the nation's No. 1 tam, was
Seedecl first followed by St. Louis,
the defending N.1.T. champions,
Utah and Wostern KCil \V'e
'fere ' a t n rt!Ci'IN
SA~tIUDA Y AFT I,""RN00
Bradley vs. New York U.
San Francisco vs. Manhattan.
SATURDAY N11T
Bowling Green vs. St. John's.
Loyola vs. CUNY.
MONDAV Al i tliNOON
Kentucky vs. the CCN -Lioy -
la winne.
Western Kentucky vs. the
Bradley-N I winner.
MONDAY NIGITI
St. Louis vs. theB owlin
Green-St. John's winner.
Utah vs. the San i ranciso-
lManhattan winner.
A complicated local situation
brought about the decision to add
five teams instead of just one. It
served to mollify the New York
schools, some of which were op-
posed to a local playoff to decide
the eighth team. It also served
to still criticism of the committee,
headed by Asa Bushnell, by local
basketball writers and others, for
ignoring Bowling G reen and Loy-
ola.
By adding; Bowling Green, the
N.I.T. wound up with six of the
first ten ranking teams of the
country.
BASKETBALL
Columbia 58, Yale 54
Arizona 54, Baylor 47

'
s_

ULL ESSION
by b. s. brown, sports editor

DOESN'T DIVE SiT:

Versatility Labels Ioss
Highly" -Vlubl rtii4

110
Byoston S.

ew York 1

CKEY

Anti Arbor

Two Maize and Blue cagers,
forward Mack Suprunowicz and
guard Bob Harrison, finished the
Big Nine season with more than
100 points.
Supey's last half scoring spree,
which saw himi dump 111 points
in the last six Conference games,
gave him third place in the final
standings, while H'arrison's 123
markers tied hin with Iowa's
Charlie Mason for the thirteenth
spot.
CENTER S grabbed the scoring
honors as three of the top five men
held down the pivot post.
Top man in the Conference
was Wisconsin's bon Rehfeldt
with 229 points, the sixth man
to ever hit more than 200 points
in a 12-game Big Nine schedule
and the third highest total ever
posted in the Conference.
The other pivotmen among the
first five were Minnesota's Jim
McIntyre with 182 markers and
for second place Ohio State's Bob
Raidiger who hit for 171 points to
take fifth spot.
IN FOURsTVplace, between Su-
prunowicz and Raidiger, is. Pur-
due's Howie Williams, who tallied
172 points. Williams plays either
guard or forward, and does well at
both.
One of the oddities in the
scoring shows that Illinois, the
highest - se or in g aggregation
ever put together in the Big

Nine, placed nobody in the top I
five and only one man in the
first 10.
Dwight "Dike" Ehlkma nll we
Illini's All-Conferene secontid-
team forward, split the twine forI
144 points and tied with Ohio{
State's Dick Schnitt.ker for the
seventh spot.
BUT THE NEW Conference ti-
tleholders showed the fine offen-
sive balance they possess by plac-
ing eight men who dropped in 50
points or better, at least two more
men than any other quintet.
Other Wolverines who racked
up over 50 points were Leo Van-
derKuy, the sophomore who
stepped into the starting center
spot in the first game against
Ohio State, and guard Pete El-
liott.
"Vandy" hit for 94 markers to
tie Northwestern's Jake Fendley
for number 21 in the standings,
while Elliott scored 69 points.
The top 10 with their points are:
Player and Team Points
Rehfeldt, Wis .............229
McIntyre, Minn. ..........182
Suprunowicz, Mich. ........178
Williams, Pur. ............172
Raidiger, OSU...........171
Skoog, Minn.............166
Eddleman, Ill. .............1141
.Schnittker, OSU ..........144
Sticklen, NU ............. 140
Butchka, Pur. ............ 139

PICKING ALL-CONFERENCE and all-American cage squads and
running a poll on the top hardwood teams in the nation has be-
come as much of a, farce as the hotly-contested football polls. Whether
it is basketball, football or curling, the all-he's-my-boy or all-that's-
my-team selections have about as much value as the recent beauty
inquiry which discovered that Jane Russell has the most outstanding
cheek bones of the year.
As follish as they might have been, the pollsters went one
step too far when they released the all-Conference cage teams the
other day. The voting took place before Michigan met Illinois
in the season finale. I'm not saying the selections are not valid
because of that, hut if the polls are t~o be, they should at least be
conducted at the end of the season.
One of the more striking examples of the fallacy of these all-you-
name-it teams is provided in the listings of the all-Conference and
all-American cage squads. Illinois' Dike Eddleman was named to he
econd all-Big Nine team behind Dick Schnittker, OSU forward, but
on the all-American squad, Eddleman took a second team slot while
the Buckeye star had to settle for a third team position.
T WON'T BE A DAY fori an April fool joke come the first of next
month, if the St. Louis Browns have their way. Brownie prexy1
Bill DeWitt has been singing a waltz to his counterpart of the St.
Louis Cards which says in effect, "You're through, Mac. Our stadium
(Sportsman's Park) is ours, so git."
With the sports world in a turmoil and every other hot-
headed character putting the blade to his competitor's throat, it
seemsi a pity that two major league diamond outfits have to start
in on a little war of their own.
And the whole dispute revolves around a name. It seems that
when Sam Breadon sold the senior loop club to Bob Hannegan and!
Fred Saigh, the new owners changed the name of the organization
from the St. l Jouis National Baseball Club to National Sports. Inc.
- 1 )eWitt claiis t.hat h tilCard, ".attempted to assign" the park lease.
whi clh is valid until 1951, to National Sports, Ine. without, the written
cioniIent of the park-Oiniie 13'rowns,
Since the ar-uinnt4 begatt and the Browns tiled an eviction
notice, the Redleg front office has gone back to the old moniker
used by Breadon, adding an "Inc." to the original title. But the
switch has not changed the minds of the Brownie bigwigs. Saigh
and DeWitt got together for a confab the other day and failed to
readh an agreeinent. If they ean't come to terms, the probability
is that A. It "llaltpy" Chandler will make his legislative voice
lea rl.
'lhe ex-senator has enough mtroubles now-he's probably figuring
out a way to handle Lippy Durocher and then there's the baseball
suit which Max Lanier, Fred Martin, Danny Gardella and others are
levelling at, the national sport -so why not have a peaceful settle-
nent without bringing in the big boss?
DeWitt had a legal notice printed in one of the local news-
papers and intends to have it run on four Mondays, a prerequisite
for a circuit court suit. DeWitt explained, "We had to publish the
notice, because the St. Louis National Baseball Club is non-ex-
istent; it is not to be found. The Secretary of State, at Jefferson
City, told us it was dead." Maybe so, but who are those guys down
in St. Petersburg Eddie Dyer is pushing around the base-paths?
Bathing beauties????
Oh well, another cold war, more or less, doesn't seem to matter any
longer, what with Joe Louis and Mike Jacobs, the T. of C. and Mike
Jacobs, the AAC and the NFL, the BAA and the NBL, Michigan and
Michigan State, and Michigan State and the University of Detroit.
But this one is in Missouri. I wonder if Harry will step in?.???
Harrson Eliot Get Hontorable
Mention on AP All-America

By KEN BIALKIN
"Jack of all trades and master
of all of them."
This phrase aptly describes
Charlie Moss, one of the most val-
uable swimmers to be found on
Matt Mann's star-studded en-
semble.
Easily the most versatile.
swimmer on the team, Moss is
equally impressive in both the
free style and the breast stroke
and, if needed, can turn in a good
job in the back stroke.
CHARLIE OFTEN doesn't knowI
which event he is going to swim
in until Mann tells him just be-
fore the meet. What he swims is
usually determined by the com-
petition facing the team and just
which events Mann is particularly
anxious to win.
Coming from a family of
swimmers, Moss has been at it ,
for at least eleven years. In
high school and at Mercersberg
Academy (Pennsylvania), he
swam the back stroke. But Moss
became a. little tired of the back
stroke and started practicing
the crawl.
When he came to Michigan he
began swimming free style. In his
freshman year here, Moss was
par~t of the 400-yard relay team J
Swhich bioke the freshman mark
with a 3:33.8.
LOOKING FOR greener fields

presents
it's 7th Annual
ICE CARNIVAL

MELODY

on

ICE

Cast of over 150
ALL NEW COSTUMES
COMIC, GRACEFUL,
and
SPECTACULAR ACTS

CLUB

FIGURE SKATING

CHIIARLtIE MOS,1

to conquer, Moss began, "Sort of
fooling around" with the breEst
stroke in his spare time. H kept
working on the breast stroke and
then one day his chance came.
In an effort to determine who
was the best breast stroker on
the team, next to Bob Sohl,
Matt Mann was running a series
of races. "Just for fun" Charlie
raced against Sohli and the rest
of the field and, to everyone but
Moss' surprise he placed right
behind Sohl. That solved the
problem of who the number two
breast stroker was, and lie's
been at it ever since.
As far as Moss is concerned, he
would rather swim in the indivi-
dual medley than any other event.
In this race, he explains, he gets
a chance to use all three strokes.
MOSS' FAVORITE competitor
used to be Harry Holiday, former
Michigan backstroker and indivi-
dual medley star. While at the
Keo Nakama Swim Meet in Hono-
lulu during the summer of 1947,
Moss finished second to Holiday
in the 150-meter individual relay.
Smith New
Mat Captain
Jim Smith, Big Nine champion
last year and runner-up in this
year's meet at 136-pounds, was
elected to captain the next edition
of the Wolverine wrestling squad.
Coach Cliff Keen also an-
nounced the letter winners of the
1948-49 season last night. There
were eight major letters given and
one reserve award was made.
The eight lettermen: retiring
captain Bob Betzig, N. Merrick,
New York; Phil Carlson, Birming-
ham; Byron Lasky, Detroit; Tom
Miller, Plymouth; John Powers,
Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jim Smith,
Shaker Heights, Ohio; and Bob
Cunningham and John Keller,
both of Ann Arbor.
The one reserve letter went to
John Hess of Grand Rapids.

f
1

Blut n ihe l "meets last
sptig o 1 iiii-d thirdl in
the individ l mmd b.y, beating
llolid.' andwl iiitgbehind
Joe r 'of l R Sae an Bob
I)'root of (AmmoSlakc
Mos is a a aJ0ma Lm'u student
and plans to cumti tih t field after
he graduates in June, 1950.
LOOK WELL-GROOMED
DASCOLA BARBERS
Lih iv yt stace

i'irneydi am! J)irc'IeJ b
A&i An Powmr
SATURDAY, MARCH 12
SUNDAY, MARCH 13
at 8 P.M.
TICKETS
100 each, including tax
Available at
University Rink, Ulrich's
Slater's, Wahr's, Michigan Union

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I SPORTS FLASHES

COMPTON, CALIF - Former
football star Tommy Harmon yes-
terday was named an advisory
backfield coach for the 1949
Compton Junior College football
team.
Harmon, the one-time Michi-
gan All-America and later a star
back for the Los Angeles Rams
professional team, joins head
coach Ray Brown's staff for spring
training.
PASADENA, CALIF.-Manager
Jack Onslow of the Chicago White
Sox will hustle his players through
their first full nine innings today
in the fourth intra-squad game.
Allen Gettel, Howard Judson and
Walter Pierce will oppose the St.
Louis Browns in the first exhibi-
tion at Hollywood Saturday, each
working three inning relays.
SPPRING
TOPCOATS
a l

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.--The
St. Louis Cardinals regulars bare-
ly nosed out the rookies 4 to 3 in
an inter-squad game yesterday.
Hardest hitter of the rookies
was Hal Rice, outfielder up from
Rochester who pounded out a
triple and two singles.
TAMPA, FLA -How arct Fox and
Bud Lively combined on a three-
hit pitching job yesterday to give
the "Sauers" a 2-0 victory over
the "Hattons" in a Cincinnati
Reds intrasquad game.
Herm Wehmeier yielded a run
in each of the first and second
innings, a wild throw by second
sacker John Lane making the sec-
ond marker possible.
LOS ANGELES, CALIF-Char-
lie Grimm, manager of the Chi-
cago Cubs, is so impressed with

pitcher Dewey Adkins, a curve ball
specialist, that he is counting on
him to be a regular starting pitch-
er this season.
j*
LAKELAND, FLA-The Detroit
Tigers' 54 - man squad went
through a four-hour workout yes-
terday with manager Red Rolfe
showing little regard for a boilingM
sun and 80-degree temperature.
Outfielders Pat Mullin and
} Johnny Groth hit the longest
drives of an extended batting
practice.
S DETROIT -- The Detroit Red
Wings all but clinched the Na-
tional Hockey League champion-
ship-their first in six years-by
beating the defending cliampion
Toronto Maple Leafs, 5 to 0, be-
fore 13,664 delighted hone fans
here last night.

Two Michigan cagers, guards
Bob Harrison and Pete Elliott, re-
ceived honorable mention selec-
tions in the Associated Press All-
American Collegiate Basketball
selections, as chosen by 404 sports-
writers and broadcasters.
Elliott, a great defensive ball-
player, amassed a total of 55 points
in thu voting, while Harrison gar-
nered 37.
Five points were given for each
first team selection, and two for
second team. Figures in parenthe-
ses denote number of first team
votes:
PLAYER, TEAM PTS.
Ed Macualey, St. Louis (331) 1,735
Alex Groza, Kentucky (325) 1,131
Ralph Beard, Kentucky (246) 1,400

Tony Lavelli, Yale (243) 1,357
Vince Boryla, Denver (117) 859
Second Team:
Wallace Jones, Kentucky (75);
Bob Harris, Oklahoma Aggies
(58); Dwight Eddleman, Illinois
(54); Bob Cousy, Holy Cross (50);
and Vern Gardner, Utah (40).
Third Team:
Ernie Vandeweghe, Colgate
(42); Kevin O'Shea, Notre Dame
(36); Jim McIntyre, Minnesota
(27); Dick Schnittker, Ohio State
(24); and Meyer Skoog, Minneso-
ta (17).
Honorable Mention:
BOB HARRISON, MICHIGAN;
PETE ELLIOTT, MICHIGAN;
Bill Erickson, Illinois; Don Reh-
feldt, Wisconsin; Howie Williams.

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