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March 09, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUE ICHIf(AON DAiLy

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9. 1949

_ _. ° m -

1

Pedges Return Egg wih
Gov. Williaiis' ' Haticoek'

breakable ovum and a card ex-'
plaining their instructions, the
dungaree-clad duo were hustled to
an outgoing highway by their Phi
Sigma Kappa actives with a word
of warning:
"Bring back the egg adorned
with the governor's signature
and a photograph of him sign-
ing-or else!"
After a quick briefing, they took
to the open road via "educated"
thumbs-their thoughtful supe-
riors had seen to it that they were
financially stripped, down to the
last red cent.
"WE HAD TERRIFIC luck, even
minus our wallets," Bill McClin-
tic, '50, and Norman Pontius, '52E,
jointly echoed.
Forced to trek the five-mile
jaunt from East Lansing to Lan-
sing, the intrepid pair reached the
governor's home, only to discover
from Mrs. Williams that he was
still at his office.
After explaining their two-
fold mission to a startled Capi-
tol guard, the exhausted men
found themselves face to face
with Gov. Williams.
"He complied with our requests
smilingly," asserted McCli n tic,
"and he didn't even bat an eyelash
when we asked him to replace his
four-in-hand with a more .Wil-
liamsish bowtie."
AFFIXING 11S signature to the
egg, Williams commented, "I've
signed my name to lots of things
but this is the first time I've
ever written it on an egg."
Members are now planning to
remove the egg's insides and
mount the object in a glass ease.
The snapshot of Gov. Williams'
signing the egg will be blown up
to dimensions of 1 ft. by 2 ft.
and retained as a house trophy.
"In memory of a fantastic
scheme which shows what a little
perseverance can do," McClintic
and Pontius both agreed.
Bridg)e Tourney
To Start Today
Competition starts today in the
Union-sponsored duplicate bridge
tournament, winners of which will
be sent by the Union to the finals
of the Midwestern Bridge Tour-
nament in Cleveland.
Contestants in the contest
should report at 7:30 p.m in the
Union Ballroom, Dale Coenen,
Union Publicity Chairman, an-
nounced.
Contestants will be charged
$.35 for each session of the tour-
nament, which will last six weeks.'

Iis iRulino
Goes nehore
Legislature
A bill to curb educational dis-
crimination has been introduced ,
into the State Legislature by Sen-
ator Charles S. Blondy of Detroit.!
It was written by Leo Weiss, a
law student here, and was basedt
.,n the Fair Education PracticesI
Act of New York state.
THE BILL would set up a five-1
member commission to receive and!
investigate unfair educational
practices, and work for their elim-'
ination.
The bill defines as educa-
tional discrimination:
Denying or limiting the admis-
sion of, or otherwise discriminat-
ing against any person or group
because of race, religion, color, na-
tional origin, or ancestry.
Having racial or religious quotas
for admission.
Requiring a photograph or other
information concerning race, re-
ligion, from any person seeking
admission.
Discriminating in the use of
scholastic, extra-curricular hous-
ing, eating or other facilities be-
cause of racial or religious origin.
Permitting use of its facilities
to organizations which do discrim-
tate in their membership.
TIHE LAW would not apply to
religious, denominational or dis-
tinctly private institutions unless
they are tax exempt.'
It would require institutions to
keep records of the reasons for
admissions and rejections for a
period of five years.

THE BETTER THINGS...
Students Swell Enrollinent in Fine Arts

By ELIN COVIOIN
University students. shopping
around for sound post-war values,
are being drawn more and morel
towards the arts, according to
Sidney M. Kaplan, of the fine arts
department.
Kaplan offers this as a partial
explanation of the t reimenclous in-
crease in literary cllege situden ts
enrolled in fine arts courses.
UNIVERSITY ART enthusiasts
have grown from 740 in 1946-1947
to 900 last year. This year they,
reached the high mark of 1330.
The art registratien for this spring
semester alone tops the total fi -
are for three years ago.
Kaplan interprets this artis-
tic gravitation as a symptom of
student dissatisfaction with can-
temporary cultural standards. Ile

said that they are anxious to
find a way of life that it not
tied up with inflations, depres-
sions and wars.
Studio art work has therapeu-
tic value, according to Gerome
Kamrowsky of the art college,
"There is a divorce between the,
emotional and inicl'ectual in the
modern world and art is the link,'
he said.
INDIVIDUALISM suffers in
these mechanistic times, especially
during a war period, and the surge
forward in art is a development of
the urge for self-expression, Kam-
rowsky added.
Prof. George II. Forsyth,
chairman of the fine arts de-
partment, believes that students
have found a "visual approach

to the problems of values" in
art. He said that students are
starting to participate in the
artistic process and are enjoy-
ing it.,
Many students think instruc-
tion in are necessary for a liberal
education. Said one coed: "I just
wouldn't feel educated without it."
OTHERS FEEL that "sitting in
an art lecture is like going to the
movies-it's a kind of escape."
For many it is "fun."
Students taking studio work ap-
preciate the opportunity they have
to express themselves. One student
said she was "tired of working
with words and numbers." She
wanted to "do something with the
hands."

--- i

CARMAN'S SHOE SALON

CHEERS FROM THE PRESIDENT-Fourteen year old Roberta
Lee, who suffered burns when saving her four younger brothers
and sisters from their burning home, gets wishes for a "rapid
and complete recovery" from President Truman. Norse Ruth
Jouppi is reading her the letter.
Jff . "i *
'dyesferah' i n{G{t I
IVIL~~~~i'wes~~ tenSL cn 1 i

FLATS

Nominated above "Hamlet" and
"The Snake Pit" as the best movie
of 1948, "Day of Wrath" will be
the first of three first-run films
to have their midwestern pre-
mieres in Ann Arbor.
Undertaking one of its biggest
projects by bringing the three

movies here, the Art Cinema
League, which is sponsoring the
Danish movie in cooperation with
the Inter-Cooperative Council,
will show the film at 8:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday at Hill Audi-
torium.

,
.
._
i

"DAY OF WRATH," a story if
SU Hh h Awitcheraft in 17th e nttiry Den-
lJ .C . tms mark , is a port rayal of the mnoril
conflict wit hin humain b eins.
To B Sta ed, il an~y, 'llilnaal of'the
To li Stae~'iArt inema Le'a te considers it
the best movie they have ever
"The tAims and Program of the presented.
"We have shown "Shoeshine,"
University High School" will be "Symphonie Pastorale" and
discussed by Prof. John M. Tryt- "Panic," but none of them are as
ten of the education school at 7 good as this." he said. "Even John
p.m. today in the high school's McCarten of the New Yorker gave
auditorium, this film rave reviews."
Prof. Trytten, who teaches com- Proceeds from the movie will be
mercial education, is principal ofm contributed to the displaced per-
University High School. His talkyf sons fund. The ICC, which is now
wilesith fough inha seis ofk ixupporting one displaced person,
will be the fourth in a series of hopes that funds from the show-
weekly public lectures being given ing of "Day of Wrath" will enable
by the education school. toextend its sponsorship to
Next week's lecture will be on 'others.
"Securing a Teaching Position."
T. Luther Purdom, director of the p
Bureau of Appointments and Oc- *- *y, I. School
cupational Information, will be - V -
the speaker.

Camnpus
Calendar
West.minster Guild-4 p.m. to-
day in the parlor of the First Pres-
byterian Church. Dr. Herrick
Young, secretary of the Presbyte-
rian Board of Foreign Missions
will be guest. All students may
attend.
IIeblew classes-7:30 p.m. to-
night at Hillel Foundation. Inter-
mediate and advanced classes.
Faculty recital-4:15 p.m. today
in Hill Auditorium. Josef Schnel-
ker, organ instructor in music
school, will perform works by
school, will perform.
Psychology Club-i7:30 p.m. to-
night at the Union. Drs. Kelly,
Satter and Walker, all of the 'psy-
chology department, will discuss
graduate school requirements and
facilities.
WPAG-11:15 a.m. today. A
drama on how nursery schools as-
sist working mothers, "What To
Do About Baby," another in the
spring series of "Red Feather on
the Air."

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WEDNE SDflY

The new business administra-
tion school, its faculty as well as
facilities, will be on display to-
morrow when over 200 members of
the Education and Industry Sec-
tion of the Detroit Economic Club
come to Ann Arbor.
The businessman and educa-
tors, in small groups, will tour the
building, and see why it is con-
sidered the most modern physical
plant of its kind in the United
States.
Dr. James P. Adams, University
Provost, will be the main speaker
at the dinner meeting of the visi-
tors at the Union. He will discuss
''\enturesonme Faith in Educa-
tion."

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