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March 07, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN nAILY

PAGE SEVEN

.... . .......... ..

WAGE 8EVZ?~

TO APPEAR AT 'U':
Merger of Old and Ne.w
in Chinese Dance Style
Lian Pei-fen, who combines the elements of modern and Chinese
ritual dances in a unique style of her own, will perform 8:30 p.m.
Friday in Pattengill Auditorium.
Miss Lin first became inspired to take up the dance upon reading
Isadora Duncan's autobiogrpahy, "My Life."
A NATIVE of Nanking, she studied tribal Chinese dances during
an excursion she made to the borders of Tibet. She also made an exten-
sive study of traditional Chnese movements, from those of street beg-

REGRESSION?
Phi Tau Spin is 1 ldicts
Take up Ja(cks harbles

lomrTo Sek
Dr.Hala Bloomer dector or
the Univ-(_,,ity :3 ec l ini . il
speak at the Institute of LOgO-I
pediecs in Wichita. ass.Idi
The topic of Dr. Bormer s address
will be "The Mc'LhalniCS Of 17elo-;
phar n' el Act ion

VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Alttcnr Ex-L~burmb di rs'
Blue Front - State and Packard
West Lodge PX -- Willow Villagc

Houses Accept
Contracts .fo "
Summer Term
Women May Apply
For Residence Now
Women may now apply at the
Office of the Dean of Women for
housing during the eight-week
summer session.
The new women's residence hall,
Betsy Barbour residence, 11 un-
dergraduate league houses, 19
graduate league houses, eight sor-
ority houses, one Inter-Collegiate
Council house and three foreign
language houses are open for ap-
plication.
MEALS will be served at four
of the league houses, five sorority
houses (open during the summer
to non-sorority women), and the
language houses.
Students may sign contracts
for the summer now, but should
be sure that they plan to en-
roll before taking that step,
Associate Dean of Women Mary
C. Bromage said.
A separate German language
house will be established for the
first time this summer, as well as
separate French and Spanish res-
idences, according to Mrs. Brom-
age.
STUDENTS LIVING in the
houses will speak only their adopt-
ed languages from the moment
they enter the residences. They
will increase their fluency at fre-
quent social affairs, as well as in
everyday conversations.
At a combined French-Span-
ish residence last summer, stu-
dents with only a limited knowl-
edge of the languages increased
their skill very quickly," Mrs.
Bromage reported.
Locations of the houses have
not yet been selected.I
A VC Requests
Stand Permit
Coneession at Stadium
Sought by Veterans
Preliminary investigations to-
ward establishment of a lucrative
AVC concession at University foot-
ball games next fall are now un-
der way, according to Ronald
Freedman, treasurer of American
Veterans Committee, Ann Arbor
chapter.
A request for license has al-
ready been made to the Univer-
sity Administration, he said.
A $1,000 television set for use
at the local Veterans' rehabilita-
tion center will soon be installed
there, reports from the AVC Vet-
erans' Affairs Committee have an-
nounced.
Funds were raised by AVC and
six other local organizations. A
former patient at the center will
install the set free of charge,
Freedman said.
OUTDOORS
OR INDOORS
You'll get
Good Pictures

WITH11 A KODAK
TOURIIST' CAMERIA
Fou (fU dcls p ni. I asslow as'
25. All hav s ynciroixiiic
IInei, d diec.'' taltminum

-gars and boxers to opera singers.
She then correlated modern
dance techniques with what she
had learned of native Chinese,
dances and achieved an entirely
original form.
Miss Lin was graduated from
Ginling College and taught danc-
ing for four years in China. Since
then she has done graduate work
in the dance at Smith College,
studied with Martha Graham, and
participated in dance festivals at
Jacob's Pillow, Mass., and Con-
necticut College for Women.
IN ADDITION she has given
recitals at Bennington College,
Choreographer's Workshop, Am-
herst College, Purdue and Illinois.
Miss Lin's program will in-
clude Sinkiang Dances, Dances
of Chinese Turkestan, The
Beautiful Garden, The Plate
Dance, Sward Dance, To Sec
My Loved One Off, Gossip, The
Nun, The Survivor, Dust to
Dust, Infinity, and Inspired by
Nature.
The program will conclude with
Song of the Field, Home Run and
The Sheperdess' Mirage.
ALL CHOREOGRAPHY and
costumes are by Miss Lin.
Tickets for Friday evening's pc -
formance may be obtained at the
Business Administration Build-
'ing, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., tomorrow to,
Friday. They will also be available
at the door.
Herbert Ag vir
To Speak on
England Here
"England-Today" will get a
thorough scrutinizing by Herbert
Agar at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
Hill Auditorium when he appears
as sixth guest lecturer for the Ora-
torical Series.
Agar has been successful as an
author, journalist, editor and dip-
lomat for many years.
AS AN AUTHOR, his brilliance
was recognized when he won the
Pulitizer Prize in American His-
tory for his book, "The People's
Choice." He has also written "The
Land of the Free," "Pursuit of
Happiness" and "A Time for
Greatness."
In 1928 Agar went to England
to remain for six years as the
literary editor of the English
Review and correspondent for
the Louisville Courier-Journal
and New York Times. In 1940 he
was promoted to editor of the
Courier-Journal.
Agar founded the nationwide -
ganizations "Fight for Freedom
and "Freedom House" and ad-
vocated American militant action
in the international crisis before
Pearl Harbor.

Sprin'. . andl a yn icf; man
fancy starts to turn.
But over on Tappan at the Phi
Kappa Tau house they're turn-!
ing in an odd direction.
JACKS, A GAME which most
of us haven't seen since we
10, seems to be on its way to
Student Health
InI February
J j
Termed Good
February was a very healthful!
month for University students ac-
cording to Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe, director of the Health Serv-
ice.
Only five cases of chickenpox,
one of German measles, and three
of mumps were reported. A de-
crease of almost 50 per cent in
the number of stomach and intes-
tinal upsets, was reported with
87 cases registered, compared with
151 cases last year.
The total cf upper respiratory
infections came to 726, 126 cases
less than within a comparable pe-
riod last year.
"We can't ascribe any particu-
lar reasons for this decrease," Dr.F
But with 20,000 students enrolled,
every winter month completed1
without an epidemic of influenza
is an occasion for rejoicing." heI
added.

. >'or to the Py -
ami id s ond hOg contests.
First the Phi 'au's took it upI
at a S a night party-
then ;-ot a challenge from. Couz-
en's Hai to a competitive match
between ( their rsepcetive places.
Quickly, the fraterinyt respond-I
ed and confidently issued a sim-
ilar challen'e to the Alpha Xi
Delas, with de idea of playing
them after defcating Couzens.
AND SO. the night oil burns at
the Phi Tau house. while the cards
sit for lornly on the shelf, and th e
bridge table is monopolized by al
bouncing rubber ball and eight o
the metal midgets.
Rudy Douthat, a pre-med and
crid land at the game is now
able to play left handed, a more
advanced stage of the sport.
Phi Tau President Dan Hegyan,
'50E, is excited about the game.
lie wants it brought into the In-
tramuiral sports schedule if Fritz
Crisler can see his way clear.
"IT'S GOT IT ALL over bridge,"
Hegyan says. "It gives those with
mere coordination and less men-
tal prowess a chance to show their
stuff."
Dave Tyson, another addict,
laughs at the charge that it's all
"kid stuff." "Show me the kid
I can't heat," Dave replies.
And athletic director Vaughn
Lowther said that "Our team will
play anybody. anytime, providing
they've got five good men -- or
women."

SAV E $2.75
oil
subscriptions
to

"

SAVE $275
onl
subscriptions
. 10

4 ees e d oacc4e

TIME and L IF E TIME and L IF E

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JAILED ON SPYING CHARGE-Miss Judith Coplon, 27-year-
old Justice Department worker, leaves Federal Court at New York
with a U.S. Marshal after her arrest on spying charges. She was
accused of taking; secrets from department files for delivery to
Valentine A. Gubitchev, a Soviet engineer who has been working
on plans for the Permanent UN headquarters under construction
in New York. Gubitchev was also arrested by FBI agents.
SPAR THATi~~r .;1L45sS:
Mudy Mardh IsII Headache
For TU' io ids2p rt i n
, C *) -'D pa tm tl

You save $1.50 on your sub-
scription to TIME, $1.25 on LIFE
--a total savings to you of $2.75
under the regular 1-year sub-
scription prices! Less than a
dime a week each for TIME and
LIFE-instead of 20¢ a copy at
the newsstand.
Place your orders for TIME and LIFE at
these Special Low College Rates today-
throvgh-

You save $1.50 on your sub-
scription to TIME, $1.25 on LIFE
-a total savings to you of $2.75
under the regular 1-year sub-
scription prices! Less than a
dime a week each for TIME and
LIFE-instead of 20¢ a copy at
the newsstand.
Place your orders for TIME and LIFE of
these Special Low College Rates today-
through-

As March moves in with her tra-
ditionally lamb-like weather, a
perennial headache returns to
plague the University Plant Dc-
partment.
Every year at approximately the
same time, Walter Roth, superin-

serve the thousands of tender
blades which people the Univer-
sity lawns.
Roth admitted that some of the
campus walks were too narrow to
handle the increased enrollment

1 .d P A1dS
2oyF ROACH PRINTING 6 °cK TsES

STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
We'll Bill You- 2= =4
To Order Just Phone

tendent of the Plant Department, of recent years. Also some new
inaugurates a campaign aimed at walks are badly needed

preventing
feet from
lawns into

the anarchy of
turning the
aC8 of mudi

student
campus

"I'T (lCOSTS Jrge' sus, m ntn('xy
to keep I he Ulivrisity: grounds
looking decent," roth said. "Stu-
dents can make this job esiv1'
and have a niccr looking canipuis
if they will cooperate by staying
on the walks in the v el weeks (t
come."
Again, as in other years, Al-
pha Phi Omega, national service
frternity will plant signs on the
campus in an attempt to pr -
Office and Portable Models
of oil maKes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONER Y & UPL.ILS
314 S It I V

The Pause That Refreshes
And It's Only Five Cents

? .:. . a' :^e '". a d; :. , r ,a, .r _: _b3i k; _x.rv v _ 'a t ; :'.'k'x* v:

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