100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 25, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FU11DAY, IThRVUARY 25, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

nju ry-R iddled

-- ff *

lcers

Face

Gophers

Tonight

Harlan Keeps Ohio State
DivingDynasty Supreme
4 - - - - - - -

By MERLE LEVIN
If you're looking for a "sure
thing" to bet the family jewels
on, take a fling on Bruce Harlan
to win all of the eight titles avail-
able to college divers this year.
The little blond diver, who will
appear here tomorrow afternoon
,when Ohio State's Buckeyes in-
vade the I-M pool, is far and away
the best diver in collegiate ranks
today.
And he achieved this distinc-
tion in what must be a new-rec-
ord for the distance.
THE STORY OF Bruce Har-
lan's achievements' must be begun
in 1942. That year a freshman
diver from Ohio State named
Miller Anderson was winning the
NAAU indoor title on the 3-meter
springboard and Sammy Lee of
Occidental College was sweeping
the outdoor titles in both the
three and 10-meter events. j
Bruce Harlan was a skinny
high school sophomore in Penn-
sylvania then. Hle fooled around
-on the springboard when he
went swimming just like most
kids his age would do but his
interests were centered on track
and wrestling.
By the time he was a senior
he had been named to captain
both the track and wrestling
squads and had won the state
wrestling title in the 112-lb. divi-
sion. But diving was still only
a hobby.
AFTER GRADUATION came
a hitch in the Navy and a chance
meeting with Jack Smith, former
Dartmouth swimming captain and
diier.
It was destined to be a great
moment for Ohio State and
Mike Peppe but nobody knew it
then. Smith liked Harlan's div-
ing form and he went to work

on him. It was 1915. Hlarlan still
hadn't done any competitive
diving.
Smith predicted that Harlan
could be an Olympic diver if he
worked. Harlan worked.
IN 1947 HE enrolled at Ohio
on the advice of Smith and Miller
Anderson whom he had met dur-
ing the war.
Anderson was back at Ohio
by then and the newly-formed
team of Anderson and Harlan
became one of the great diving
duos in college annals.
Harlan was still improving last
spring as the two man battle for
individual honors became closer
and closer. Anderson had won
both board events in the Western
Conference and AAU indoor meets
as well as the NCAA three-meter
diving title by the time the Olym-
pic trials rolled around
ON THE OTHER HAND, Har-
lan had to be content with the
NCAA one-meter crown and the
NAAU outdoor titles in both
springboard and platform diving.
But when the Olympics came
around it was Harlan who was
boss. The curly-haired Adonis
(as the Buckeye swimming re-
lease describes him) who had
been diving for only three years
whipped both Anderson and the
veteran Dr. Sammy Lee our
friend from 1942, in the three-
meter event at London and was
second to Lee in the platform
diving.
A natural athlete-he shot an
84 on his third game of golf-
Harlan is one of the country's
top trampoline artists and Buck-
eye officials have asked that the
Ohio-Michigan 'gymnastics meet
be held up until after the
swimming meet so that Harlan
may compete in both contests.

Williams Hits
For $100,000
BOSTON -- (A-Slugger Ted
Williams' oft-repeated ambi-
Lion to become baseball's first
100,00 player appeared ful-
Filled last night when he ad-
vised General Manager Joe
Cronin he would sign his 1949
Red Sox contract on arrival at
the Sarasota training camp on
Warch 6.
I've just had a phone call
rom Ted in Everglades City,
Fla., during which he told me
lie was very happy about his
contract and would sign up
when he reports about two
weeks hence," Cronin said.

By PRES HOLMES
It's amazing how easy it is to
change from the garb of "goat"
to the velvet robes of a hero.
Against a strong and unpredict-
able Purdue cage squad last Mon-
day night Mack Suprunowicz
achieved the latter with his record
breaking performance of 28
points.
* * *
JUST TWO weeks before, after
the Wisconsin game, armchair
basketball experts were shaking
their heads and wondering what
had happened to the scoring
prowess of the Michigan forward,

A nong Big Nine Scorers

who netted
night.

onlI (i!Ait pointls tIhat

Suprunowicz Rates High Two Wolverine Stars Out

CINDER

SIZZLERS:

Duff, Whitfield Head Strong
Buckeye Cinder Aggregation

By HUGH QUINN
Lloyd Duff and Mal Whitfield,
two of the greatest performers in
the history of track and field, will
dig their spikes into the Yost Field
Rouse track tomorrow when Ohio
State's track team comes to Ann
Arbor.
A threat is any event he enters,
Duff is a consistent point-getter
for the Buckeyes, defending West-
ern Conference champs. In last
year's indoor Conference meet, he
set a scoring record by earning 16
points in four events.
HE COPPED the 70-yard high
hurdles and the broad jump, and
finished third in the low hurdles
and the pole vault. The Buck-
eye captain leaped 24 ft., 4% in.
for his broad jump win, but his
best mark is 24 ft., 10 in.
In winning the Big Nine high
hurdles crown, he set a new
American record for the 70-yard
distance of :08.4. Duff also has
a mark of :13.9 for the 120-yard
highs. He is one of seven men
in American track annals who
have bettered :14 in this event.
Duff has a jump of 13 ft., 11/4
in. to his credit in the pole vault,
and he consistently betters 13 ft.,
enough to place against any team
in the n'ation.

THE VERSATILE Ohioan proved
to be a snare in the Wolverine's
path last season. In the dual meet
at Yost Field House, which the
Buckeyes won, he accounted for
19 points with three firsts and a
tie for another.
Ile won both the 65-yard high
and low, hurdles, the broad
jump, and tied with Ed Ulvestad
for first place in the pole vault.
In 1947, Duff proved his ill-
around ability by taking secondl
place in the national DecathlonI
championships.
* * *
W'HITFIELD is the holder of
the Olympic 800-meter record of
1:49.2. The slim middle-distance
ace won the metric-equivalent to
the half-mile run at London last
summer, running against the
world's fastest half-milers.
When he returned to school at
Ohio State in September, he felt
that he wouldn't have the time
to devote to track this year, be-
cause of his Air Corps duties
and his newly acquired wife.
But just recently, tie found out
that like all good trackmen, he
couldn't stay away. So he reported
for practice, and Buckeye Coach
Larry Snyder is grooming him for
a Conference gold medal.

In other discussions of the tilt
with the Badgers the fact that
Supe was shooting so much dur-
ing the game was discussed in
solemn tones. It seems that heI
took 26 shots from the floor and
made only two.
This does seem like a sad con-
dition, but after the Purdue game
there didn't seem to be any com-
ments saying that Supe was shoot-
ing too much, yet he took exactly I
the same number of shots against
the Boilermakers as he did in the
Wisconsin game.
* $ *
THE BIG DIFFERENCE, of
course, lies in the fact that eleven
more went in last Monday than
did a couple of weeks ago.
The enviable point total
which Mack gathered in the
Purdue battle is almost double
his scoring average for the sea-
son in Conference play. With
nine ganes under the belt he
has piled up 132 points for
slightly better than 14.6 per
game and sixth place in the
standings.
After a quick glance at the sta-'
tistics it looks like Mack could
take runner-up honors in the
Conference, and with another hot
night or so might even take the
blue ribbon.
** *
BARRING a splurge by either
Purdue's Howie Williams or Buck-
eye Bob Raidiger, who are tied for
second presently with 163 points#
apiece, Supe could pass them if he
simply maintains his average.
Both of these men have al-
ready played eleven contests

41-
if :tli\Ol i a t1 h it o si
jthle blues, it's Wolverinet I w key
coach Vic fleyliger.
With a crucial tilt on tap
against Minnesota in the Colise-
um tonight at 8:00, two and pos-
sibly three of his best players will
be sitting on the sidelines with in-
juries or illness.
* * *
BESIDES Dick Starrak who
was hurt against the Gophers last
week in Rochester, Minn., ace for-
.__',__ r..,....._

Sitthe Gophers. At full
strength, the Malaize and Ilue
would have gone into the game
heavily favored.
Michigan needs two victories to
seal the mid-western bid to the
NCAA tournament for the second
straight year. A victory tonight
would give them at least a tie.
LAST WEEK-END, the Wol-
verines slapped the Gophers down
twice, 4-1 and 6-3, to take the edge
in the tourney fight.
Renfrew had been slated to
fill Starrak's boots, but his ill-
ness puts a new complexion on
the matter. lleyliger said that
he might use Joe Marmo, a, jun-
ior in one of the two posts.
If this doesn't work out, forward
duty will be divided among the
five remaining forwards of the
first two lines, Gordie McMillan,

I'

I ,

1i

1 r----w-'---' r 'Vr
SE

;NIORS

11

Wally Gacek, Wally Grant. 011
Burford and Neil Celley.
* * *
MINNESOTA, on the other
hand, will be at full strength for
the tilt and could give Michigan
a lot of trouble with the right
breaks on their side.
While they were anything
but impressive in their two loss-
es to the Wolverines, they did
display a scoring punch and
could explode at any time.
Captain Rollie Depaul, Jerrt
Lindegard, John O'Brien and
Jack Bonner are outstanding for
Minnesota and it will take an alert
defense to stop them.
The Gophers also boast a strong
defense, with Jack McEwen in
goal.
The two teams meet again to-
morrow night to conclude their
series for the year.

r
'
F
i
i

Your Official University of Michigan
Ring is noW available at Balfours
for immediate delivery in most sizes
We invite you to stop in and try yours on without
obligation. Your initials and last name beautifully
engraved with our compliments.

AL RENFREW
...ailig

ward Al lenfrew will be mjissito'
tonight becaus twof a ston ah ail-
ment. Also, there is a strong lpos-
s ibility that ,Bob Ftming may
not see action due to a cliest dis-
turbance.

- ._ -- - ww

DRUG STORE
340 South State

LIGHT LUNCHES SERVED
at our Fountain

DAILYi
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Prescriptions'

Drug Sundries

Stationery
Student Supplies
THE REXALL STORE
On The Campus

..\
3 \
a}
t, .:;.. tI
1
. . .i
y a
'SNP
.:3
7
a'
,
...... .... c._w;y. ;rw. .ww
yn,^A.
i

Navy-Type
T SHIRTS
First Quality
Surplus
only
k-44c

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication(11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1949
VOL. LIX, No. 100
Notices
Ann Arbor Extension Courses:
As the result of special requests,
the Extension Service is adding
the following noncredit courses to
its list of classes already an-
nounced. Ceramics: Bassic ceramic
design applied to the potter's
wheel and simple uses of glazes.
Planned especially for teachers
and students of hand crafts. Ten
weeks, fee $10.00, materials $5.00.
Instructor: Assistant Prof. Grover
Cole, Wednesday evenings begin-
ning March 2, 8 to 10 p.m., 125
Architecture Bldg.
Ornithology: Bird study course,
illustrated lectures and field trips.
Designed for family participation.
Eight4 weeks, fee $4.00. Parents
who enroll may bring their chil-
dren with no extra fee. Instruc-
tor Dr. Nelson G. Hairston. Tues-
day evenings beginning March 15,,
7:30 p.m., 35 Angell Hall.
Enrollment for these courses
may be completed at the Exten-
sion Service Office, or at the first
class session. The dates given are
those of the first class meeting.
Alice Crocker Lloyd Fellowship:
Application blanks for the Alice
Crocker Lloyd Fellowship may be
obtained in the Alumnae Council
Office, Michigan League, before
Fri., March 4. Personality, achieve-
ment, and leadership are consid-
ered in naming the recipient. This
fellowship is open to women grad-
uates of all accredited colleges and
universities for graduate work at
the University of Michigan. Grad-
uates of the University of Michi-

gan may use this award for work
at any university selected. The sti-
pend will be $750.
Approved social events for the
coming weekend:
February 25
Couzens Hall, Gamma Delta,
Hayden House, Mich. Christian
=Fellowship, Triangle Fraternity
February 26
Abbey House, Acacia, Adams
House, Alpha Chi Sigma, Alpha
Kappa Psi, Beta Theta Pi, Chi
Phi, Delta Sigma Delta, Delta Tau
Delta, Delta Upsilon.
F. F. Fraternity, Greene House,
Henderson House, Hillel Founda-
tion, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Rho
(Continued on Page 4)

with only one to play, while
Supe has three more games in
which to operate.
Minnesota's Jim McIntyre and
Whitey Skoog might give the
Michigan forward a run for his
second-place money as they have
two games to go and have 149 and
146 points respectively.
TOP SCORING honors seem
fairly well sewed up by Wiscon-
sin's Don Rehfeldt, who has just
two games left to play but has 179
points to his credit. If he scored
only 10 points a night Supe would
need better than 22 points in each
of his remaining games to edge
the Badger.
This is not as impossible as it
may seem, however, as Mack has
averaged 21.6 points in the tfhve
games since the Wisconsin fiasco,
OUR TONSORIAL
ARTISTS
Use sanitary, modern methods
to give you that well-groomed
look!! Queries invited!!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

These injuries will put the
Wolverines on about even terms
13
Buying Days Left
at
$5.00
ENSBIAN
200-5:00 PM.
Student Publcation Bldg.

Designers and Manufacturers of the Official
University of Michigan Ring.

1319 S. University

Michigan rings are also available from your
official jeweler with fraternity coat of arms or
encrusted Greek letters.
A small deposit will hold your ring until you
want it. Reserve yours now.
L Ga ]BALFOUR CO.

LET'UGO ...to the
aI
BEER -- WINE-- MiXERS I
DRIVE-THRU
COURTEOUS SERVICE NO PARKING
Daily 10 A.M. - 10 P.M. - Sunday, Noon - 7 P.M.
114 E. Williams Phone 7191
.~.......
;A

0

. :
:tat
r "} ,}'.
e$ .L'
'" {wt

The Fashion Spotlight is
on your New MALLORY
Lightweight
"Premier".
for this fresh
new lightweight
felt that will look ,
so well on you
Handsomely propor-
tioned with smart, trim
shoe string self band and
narrow welt edge. In Sky
grey, Cadet blue, Cruiser
grey, Commando brown or .
Cameo tan.
$10:

Ann Arbor

Peo
tele
to P7
are
B
to i
tele
T
mob
real
imp
and
and
elec

They're

popping up
all over

/ , 0

ple have been wanting more and more
phone service and we've been working hard
rovide it. We've added nearly 9,000,000 new
phones in the past three years. Still more
needed and are on the way.
ut that's not all that we've been doing
ncrease the usefulness and value of the
phone.
elephone service has been extended to auto-
biles, trucks, boats, trains and airplanes...
progress has been made in expanding and
roving rural telephone facilities . . . wire
radio relay networks have been developed
enlarged.. . research has started on new
ctronic devices which promise to bring even

$388

Al

I

Sizes

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan