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September 29, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-29

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WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

X"ACIR T REE

..

Cleveland I
Y-W Gridders Pin Offensive
Sopes on Koceski, Ortrnann
DrMA 'totte Unlikely Starter in Oregon Fray,
'eninga Continues Play at Left Half in Shift

9owns

White

Sox,

11-0

Michigan's offensive hopes for
Saturday game with Oregon rest-
ed squarely on the shoulders of
two blond sophomores today as
Wolverine head coach Bennie
Oosterbaan moved Chuck Ort-
mann to the number one tailback
. spot and had Leo Koceski operat-
ing from the first team right half
position.
Ortmann was elevated to fill the
shoes of the injured Gene Derri-
cotte, who sprained his knee early
in the second half of the Michi-
gan State game. Derricotte prob-
ably will be unable to see action in
the Oregon tilt.
CONTINUING the shift, insti-
tuted Monday, Ooosterbaan ran
Wally Teninga from his old left
half position. During his two pre-
vious seasons with the Wolverines,
Teninga has operated out of the
tailback position and was shifted
to wingback at the beginning of
this season.
Even though Oregon has been
touted as primarily a passing
team, most of their net yardage
has been picked up from rush-
ing. ,In their two games, with
Santa Barbara and Stanford,
they have picked up a total of
721 yards.
Of this, 558 has been garnered
via the ground route, while Norm
Van Brocklin and his replacement
Clare Tom have passed for the
others 163 yards.
JOHNNY McKAY, elusive half-
back has been the most consistent
ground gainer for the Webfeet, av-
SPORTS
MERLE LEVIN, Night Editor

ยง'rom Ide
GRANTSTAND
By MURRAY GRANT ... Daily Sports Editor
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This column was written by Herbert Ruskin, Daily
Sports Night Editor).1
FOOTBALL IS A SERIOUS SPORT as any coach, player or spectator1
will tell you, but very often there is a lighter touch underneath
this serious exterior.
Sub trouble has given many a coach some additional grey hairs,;
but has provided the fans with a lot of laughs. Cumberland College
ran into a little of this trouble on the black day in its athletic history
when it lost to Georgia Tech by the record score of 220-0.
During one of the infrequent periods when they had possession
of the ball, the Cumberland ball carrier fumbled and the pigskin
rolled near a sub who had just entered the game. As three Tech
giants bore down on him, one of his fellow players shouted, "Fall l
on it." "Fall on it, hell," came the reply, "I didn't drop it."
"Sleepy" Jim Crowley, Notre Dame great had a little trouble of
his own when he joined the coaching ranks. One 'year saw a Crowleyl
coached Fordham eleven run up against NYU on a day that one
Violet end chose to get hot. He caught three straight passes beforej
Crowley decided that his safety man was not doing too good of a,
job. He called a sub halfback off the bench and sent him into1
the game with instructions to watch that end. The halfback nodded
agreement and raced into the game.
The NYU end stayed hot and snagged four more heaves, the
last going for a touchdown. As the sub back came off the field,
Crowley called to him, "Didn't I tell you to watch that end?" "I sure
did coach," was the breathless reply, "he really did a great job."
H ALFTIME locker room pep talks have given the general public
more than their 'share of laughs. Like the time that Podunk
College was given the singular honor of being placed on mighty Notre
Dame's schedule.
Podunk hadn't fared too well during the first half and their
coach gave them a fiery pep talk in the locker room. Time came
for the return to the field and somebody opened a door. Inspired
by their coach's talk, the Podunk squad charged out and-fell as
one man into the gymnasium swimming pool. Whoever had opened
the door, had chosen the wrong one.
Michigan's athletic director, Herbert O. "Fritz" Crisler figures
in one dressing room episode. He was then coach at Princeton and
his Tigers were on the short end of the score when half time
rolled around.
Crisler gave his team an emotional spanking during the inter-
mission, with the result that several of the Princeton players began
to cry. To keep in the spirit, Crisler himself started to sob. Winding
up his speech, he pleaded, "I want each of you to promise me that
you'll go out there and do your best."
Tears still streaming down his cheeks, Crisler stood at the door,
congratulating himself on the fine job he had done, until he received
a shock in the form of a slap on the back from one burly player who
left with the admonition to the austere coach, "C'mon toots, get a hold
i of yourself."

(By The Associated Press)
Backing Gene Bearden's shutout
pitching with a 13-hit attack, the
Cleveland Indians walloped the
Chicago White Sox, 11 to 0 to-
night, to open up a two-game
lead over Boston and New York in
the American League pennant
race.
The victory, Cleveland's third
straight and 17th in their last
20 games, gave the Tribe a stran-
gle hold on the flag, since each
of the three contenders has only
four games remaining. The Red
Sox and Yankees, deadlocked for
second place, set the stage, for the
Indians' almost insurmountable
lead by losing their afternoon
games.
a * * *
A THREE-RUN first inning off
Lefty Bill Wright ignited by lead-
off batter Dale Mitchell's' 380-
foot home run into the right field
stands, sent the Indians off to a
flying start.
The Philadelphia Athletics
couldn't do a thing with Vic
Raschi all year but today, with
the New York Yankees in ur-
gent need of a victory, the A's

turned on their tormenter to
blast out a 5-2 triumph.
Raschi had beaten the A's five
times this season and had an
eight-game streak over them. This
afternoon he was no match for
21-year old Carl Scheib. The young
Philadelphia righthander gave up
11 hits but he was superb in the
pinches, blanking them until the
ninth.
RAE SCARBOROUGH trimmed
the Boston Red Sox pennant hopes
to a flickering ray of dying hope
when he held them to six hits in
a 4-2 Washington victory.
All the damage happened in
the second inning when Wash-
ington-a team that recently
lost 18 straight and had won
only one out of eight previous
Fenway starts this season-
broke loose with four runs.
St. Louis whipped Detroit 5-3
in the other American League tilt
while in the National League
Brooklyn edged Boston, 9-8, Chi-
cago downed Cincinnati, 6-2 and
New York and Phladelphia split
a double-header. St. Louis and"
Pittsburgh were rained out.

Indians Lead by Two Games
As Yankees, Red Sox Lose

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.I

A

CHUCK ORTMANN
. ..Sophomore Star
* * * .
eraging better than seven yards
for 25 rushes. McKay also is the
leading scorer, having crossed that
last chalk line five times.
While Van Brocklin and Tom,
both operating as T-formation
quarterbacks, have completed
almost half of their attempted
passes, the Webfeet have yet to
score a touchdown via the aerial
route. In addition to his pass-
ing, Van Brocklin doubles as
Oregon's extra point man, hav-
ing kicked nine of 11 attempts.
In the kicking department, the
Webfeet do not seem to be up to
par, averaging about 33 yards a
boot. Van Brocklin, who has done
most of the Oregon punting, is
about one yard under this figure.
Trueblood Cup
Play To Start
Golf mentor Bert Katzenmeyer
has announced that the Trueblood
tournament will get under way
Saturday and Sunday with anyone
on campus eligible except those
that have garnered awards in golf.
The trophy named in honor of
Michigan's "Grand Old Man of
Golf," Professor Thomas C. True-
blood, is awarded each fall to the
man that can survive 36 holes of
medal play and then successive
rounds of match play.
Coach Katzenmeyer has set to-
morrow evening as the final time
that anyone can register. The
clubhouse will be open until dark
tomorrow to receive entries from
all interested golfers or duffers.

P 1

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STEPPING STONES:
Football Jayvees Work Hard
Preparing Varsity for Games

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By PRES HOLMESI
Four teams practice daily on
the turf at Ferry Field, but after
naming the obvious three-the
Varsity, the 150-pound squad, and
the freshman gridders-the fourth
one becomes a problem.
It's almost a question of "now
you see' it, now you don't." Part
of the time it's a team and then
again, just when you think you've
got it settled, it has disappeared.
The elusive body referred to is
the Junior Varsity football team.
ALSO IN THE hands of a new
mentor this year, Don Robinson,
this counterpart of the Varsity is
aptly named. The main function
of the organization is to serve as
a tool to be used as desired by
the varsity gridders.
In effect, it i the task of the
'B' team to master the plays of
the forthcoming varsity oppon-
ent, and use them when scrim-

maging against the pupils of
head coach Bennie Oosterbaan.
The necessity of learning forty
or fifty new plays each week, plus
the lack of time to practice and
perfect their own plays tends to
stack the chips against the Jay-
vees, as far as becoming a smooth-
running, effective football ma-
chine.
HOWEVER, in order to give the
team some experience under real
battle conditions, four games have
been scheduled for coach Robin-
son's charges.
The first game will be played
on Ferry Field October 15
against Northwestern.
This is followed by a home-and-
home series with the Michigan
State Jayvees. The junior Wolver-
ines round out the season at Co-
lumbus, playing the Buckeye "B"
team the morning of November 20.

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