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January 14, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V; 1 4, 149

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

PAGE TnEJ

GOUT ON THE WAY OUT:
'Atom-Weigher' Joins Fighton Disease

Univefsity research workers
have been given an effectivetwea-
pon. in their ceaseless battle to
solve the mystery of such illnesses
as diabetes, gland disorders, kid-
ney disease and gout.
A mass spectrometer, capable
of weighing the atoins and mole-
cules of tracers used in medical
research, has just been construct-
ed and is ready for use in the
University's Randall Laboratory
of Physics.
Ws* * r
WITH THE spectrometer, Hien-

ry J. Gomberg, instructor in elec-
trical engineering, Dr. Isadore
Lampe, associate professor of
roentgenology, and Dr. William
Robinson, director of the Rack-
ham Arthritis Research Unit, will
conduct an extensive research
project to gain fuller knowledge
of the process of metabolism.-
"Full understanding of met-
abolism will make it possible to
detect just' what disturbances
in body chemistry produce ill-
nesses," Dr. Robinson said.
Explaining the technique to be

used in the research, Gomberg
said that tracer substances would
be incorporated into the mole-
cules to be studied, such as mole-
cules of proteins or carbohy-
drates.
* * *
AFTER INTRODUCING the
substance into the body, the tra-
cer will permit the following of
proteins or carbohydrates through
the various stages of metabolism
until they have been converted
into tissue or blood or broken
down and eliminated by the body.

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"The tracer substances used
will be heavy stable isotopes of
oxygen, nitrogen hydrogen or
carbon," Gomberg said.

ENJOY GOOD FOOD
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Om pAe INI N
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t

Open 6 A.M. - 11 :0 P.M. Daily
Three Blocks beyond S

"Isotopes of an element are dif-
ferent forms of the element with
the same chemical properties but
with slight differences in atomic
weight.
* * *
SAMPLES OF TISSUE from
animals, usually white- rats, will
be used to study body chemistry
at various stages and samples of
blood and urine from human be-
ings will be used, according to
Dr. Lampe.
The element under study will
be isolated from the sample,
usually as a gas which, in turn,
will be broken down into elec-
trically-charged particles.
The particles will then be pass-
ed through an electric and mag-
netic field in the mass spectrom-
eter and in this process the heavy
atoms, containing the tracer ele-
ment, will follow a different path
than those of normal atomic
weight.

eacher Job
Pros pects
Called Good
Closely Screen
February graduates with a
teacher's certificates can be rea-
sonably sure of obtaining jobs,
according to John C. Brennan of
the Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information.
"There are mnore opening fox
teaching positions than we can fill,
especially in commercial subjects
and in English," he declared.
HOWEVER, Brennan said that
social science majors and male
physical education majors may
find job-hunting harder than it
was five years ago.
Employers are using more
care in selecting applicants for
technical jobs than they have
in previous years, Brennan said.
"During the war and postwat
period, companies hired the first
men that came along because they
needed them so desperately. Now
they are searching carefully to
find the right man for the right
job."
"MORE COMPANIES are com-
ing to the colleges this year to find
prospective employes.
Employers who formerly hired
men and then trained them are
looking for men who already have
had training."
Salaries for newcomers to the
business world will remain about
the same as they were last spring,
he said.

2045 Packard Road
tadium Blvd.

EXTRA PENNIES:
Student Book Exchange Plans

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I

A ..N A"
wwm14frW 1414

In Ann Arbor
508 E. William

stages a sensational
RECORD
SA L E

Chicago Lecturer Discusses
Drafting of World Constitution

Students can put their unwant-
ed text books on the market, earn
a few pennies for a J-Hop ticket
and pick up good bargains in
schoolbooks when the Student
Book Exchange opens shop on
Tuesday, February 1.
Run by the Interfraternity
Council as a service to the cam-
pus, the Exchange is located in
Rm. 3-C of the Union and will
be open every day from 1 to 5
p.m. through Feb. 11 except on
J-Hop weekend.
THE EXCHANGE racks a stu-
dent's books for sale at the price
he decides. If the book doesn't
sell, he may claim it after the
Exchange closes its doors. If it
sells, a check will be mailed to
him later.
A non-profit organiation, the
Exchange charges a ten per
Four Campus
Orgyanizations
Elect Officers
Winding up a semester of activ-
ity, four campus organizations
have elected officers for the com-
ing term.
Phi Eta Sigma, freshman honor
society. Association of Indepen-
dent Men, United World Federal-
ists and the Student Religious As-
sociations have all named new of-
ficers.
FROM ITS 29 new members
Phi Eta Sigma chose Jerome
Goldman, '52, president; Harvey
Weiner, '52, vice-president; John
Hammersmith, '51, treasurer;
Donald Downie, '52E, secretary
and Donald Sigmion, '51E, his-
torian.
Completing its election of of-
fieers AIM elected Ralph Oi-
vanti vice-president; Richard
Low, '50, secretary; and Bristol
Hunter, '49, treasurer. The or-
ganization had previously elect-
ed Ray Guerin, '50, president.
At their semi-annual election
meeting, the United World Fed-
eralists picked a new slate of of-
ficers headed by John Knauss,
Grad., as president.
* * *
SAM DUDLEY, BAd., was re-
elected vice-president; Charles
Schoenberg, '50E, was named re-
cording secret ary; Bob Biurges
Grad., treasurer, and Catherine
Warren, '50, corresponding secre-
tary.
Philip T. Austin, BAd., former
vice-president of the Student Re-
ligious Association, was elected
president of that group.
Crai To Conduct
Teacher's Chorus
The Midwestern School Music
Conference will get the profes-
sional touch when Don Craig,
Fred Waring's glee club conduc-
tor, leads a 125-member "teach-
ers' chorus" when the musicians
meet here today through Sunday.
Music educators from all over
the Midwest will be on hand to
watch 'and participate in vocal
and instrmnental music rehearsal
for the forthcoming State Music
Festival.

cent fee to cover the overhead.
Unsold books that are not
claimed are sold to local book-
stores.
"The exchange has books for
every conceivable course--and
some that are not conceivable,"
said Dick Morrison, '50. He took
over management of the Exchange
from Dale Drollinger, '50E.
** *
"WE HAVE many excellent
buys, he said.
The IFC took over the control
of the Exchange from the Stu-
dent Legislature and did between
$4,000 and $5,000 worth of bus-
iness during the semester.

Read ... and Use Classified Ads

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Mail Orders Filled While These
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The demolition of Hiroshima by
the atom bomb was the impetus
for the formation of a World Con-
stitution, Prof. G. A. Borgese
commented yesterday.
Prof. Borgese, Secretary of the'
Chicago Committee To Frame a
World Constitution and former
professor of Italian literature at
the University of Chicago, hit the
high spots involved in framing
the world constitution in a politi-
cal science lecture.
"BUT THE ADVENT of the
atomic age offers the alternatives
of world government or world de-
struction," he declared. "However,
the everpresent fear of the atom
bomb does not exist any longer,
as a potent force."
He emphasized that there can
never be an international con-
trol of atomic energy without a
world government which must
precede it.
The Chicago committee headed
by Chancellor Robert M. Hutch-
ins, prepared the constitution as
a blueprint of thought and action
for mankind.
WITH A MIXTURE of fear and
faith, theoretical and practical
political scientists combined to
draft the plan with the firm be-

lief that what is necessary is pos-
sible, he said.
Calling the constitution "far
from utopian," he explained
that it divided the earth into
nine regions for representation
in the world legislature. Trhe
basic principle of the plan is
that it represents peoples and
not national interests.
A President with broad powers
and a tribune of the people act,-
ing Ors a court would check legis-
lation of the assembly, lie said.
University..
(Continued from Page 1)
tragic death would be the abolish-
ment of the Un-American Activi-
ties Committee," Dean Keniston
added.
Prof. Leonard believes that
Duggan, who was recovering
from an operation at the time
of his death, "blacked out"
while he stood at the open win-
dow ofdhis office and plunged
to his doom.
(Police reports indicated that
the window through which Dug-
gan fell was 44 inches wide' and
only 33 inches from the floor.)
Prof. Leonard added his crit-
icism of the Un-American Activ-
ities Committee. "Their action in
smearing Duggan's name is unfor-
giveable," he stated "Anyone who
knew Duggan could never doubt
his loyalty for an instant."

9.

"WILL IT RAIN TONIGHT?'"

.. everyone wants to know, but military
and air-line pilots must know and know
promptly!
To help transmit this information, the
Bell System maintains the largest fac-
simile transmission system in the world
.. a network nearly 20,000 miles long.
Over these wires the United States Air
Force, in cooperation with the United
States Weather Bureau and other govern-
ment agencies, is able to send up-to-the-

minute weather charts and maps to many
points simultaneously. Each receives a
faithful reproduction of the originals.
The chance for error is eliminated, valu-
able time is saved.
This network is a part of America's
vast communications system'-the finest
in the world. The job of maintaining and
improving this system, of keeping the
cost of telephone service as low as possi-
ble, never ends.

BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM

W OcTPo

Which
S18 Jobs C
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Jo you want
right
now?

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General Manager
Advertising Manager
Finance Manager
Local Adv. Manager
Assistant Manager
Promotion Manager
Assistant Manager
Circulation Manager
Assistant Manager
National Adv. Mgr.
Assistant Manager
Jr. Acct. Executive
Jr. Acct. Manager
Layout Assistant
Jr. Finance Manager

HOW YOU CAN
TAKE A SHORT-CUT
TO SUCCESS...
THURSDAY, Feb. 10, the bus-
iness staff of the Michigan Daily
offers you a chance of a lifetime
to get newspaper experience in a
department of your own choos-
ing. What are your interests?
Advertising . .. finance ... lay-
out? The Daily is prepared to
give you experience in these and
many more departments that
will prove invaluable to you ...
experience that pays big divi-
dends whether or not you re-
main in newspaper work.
You don't need any previous
experience. All you do is express
your willingness and interest by
coming to the Student Publica-
tions Bldg., Thursday, Feb. 10 at
4 P.M.
You get easy advancement,
too. Promotions come your way
regularly in all departments and
pay increases go with them.
As a member of the Daily bus-
iness staff, you are molding your
future. The experience, contacts,
and responsibilities you receive
will prove a measureless aid to
you after graduation.
Don't pass up the biggest
opportunity now open to you
Michigan students.

Aftit

foo"x

I

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