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January 13, 1949 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWRTSDAY JANUARY Of 190

I-

I

The
City Editor's
SCRATCH
PAD

Science Orientation

i

THERES been a heartening
the activities of student
during the past semester.

increase in
government

A quick review of the last four months
reveals that no less than three new stu-
dent councils have been formed in the
various schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity. At the same time, the embryo
all-campus student government, the
Student Legislature, has considerably
strengthened its position.
Elsewhere, faculty and administrative
committees have shown an increased wil-
lingness to work in conjunction with stu-
dent groups. This was evidenced in the
close cooperation between a faculty Senate
committee and a student group both work-
ing on measures designed to remove the
controversial "speaker's ban."
Here at The Daily this trend toward giv-
ing students increased responsibility was
shown in the addition of student editors as
non-voting members of the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Meanwhile, two students were added to
the University Disciplinary Committee in
a non-voting capacity, the Engineering Stu-
dent Council was given complete control
over honor system disciplinary matters and
the influence of the East and West Quad
councils was extended.
It is too early to say how the new stu-
dent councils, in the Music, Grad and
Bus. Ad. Schools, will work out.
But already the Grad School council is
working on plans for a revision in what
they consider to be objectional curriculum
requirements. The Bus. Ad. Student
Council sponsored a student evaluation
program and now promises to help work
out the kinks in a plan which limits the
number of electives allowed the business
students.
On the all-campus student government
front the Student Legislature finally seems
to be able to focus its attention on specific
problems instead of trying to do everything
at once. They have elected an able presis-
dent to carry on the programs instituted by
this semester's SL chief.
This trend toward an increased student
voice in the affairs of the campus is a logi-
cal development. During the war the cam-
pus was turned into a vast intellectual train-
Ing ground for the arned services. Of neces-
sity student government took a back seat
to army and university authorities.
Following the war the University au-
thorities for a time seemed reluctant to
give studentsmuch of a voice in policy
and disciplinary matters. As a sop to
student pressure, various student gov-
ernmental bodies were allowed to form
but they were not given much power.
Once formed, however, the student groups
vigorously enlarge the oope ottheir au-
thority and have secured the respect of
official University administrative authori-
ties.
Now they must coordinate their efforts.
Currently we have almost a dozen auton-
omous student groups operating in the
various schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity. The powers of each group must
be delineated. And some central authority
must be provided to keep the various
groups from going off in a dozen different
directions.
The relation between the elected, all-
camus Student Legislature and the ap-
pointed Student Affairs Committee should
be determined.
This job of coordination and delineation
of authority should be one of the major
aims of student government during the
spring semester. At the same time the
various groups must continue to move for-
ward in order to make the voice of the stu-
dent an effective force in University edu-
cational administration and policy matters.
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: MARY STEIN

Well Founded
THE INVESTIGATION into the Georgia
lynch-slaying of a Negro came to a
dfamatic close recently in a Lyons, Ga.,
court when two white men were released
from murder charges.
One was acquitted by a jury in 20 minutes
and the other dismissed on a State's mo-
tion.
They had been recognized by the vic-
tim's wife as two of twenty white-robed
men who had stopped the Negro's car,
puiled him out and shot him.
Most unusual incident in the trial was
when two members of the jury stepped
down into the witness box to testify and
vouch for the defendant's high reputation.
This action is not illegal nor even unprece-
dented. Yet it presents the curious problem
of whether a jury in this case could ever
conceivably reach a verdict not in line with
the testimony of one of its members!
The pair who served in a dual capacity
--Ala 1 1a ..r4 Vh would no heipv

ONE OF THE innovations badly needed in
the literary college is a general educa-.
tion program-a series of courses designed
to orient the undergraduate in various fields
of knowledge.
The faculty probably worked intermit-
tently on this problem even before the
report of the Harvard Committee on Gen-
eral Education, which awakened such na-
tion-wide interest, and the Columbia Uni-
versity faculty's adoption of a compulsory
general education program. ,0
We'd like to suggest that such a program
is now even more imperative here than it
was before, and that possibly the best place
to begin is in the science departments.
These are interdependent and highly inte-
grated studies. Scientists are unified by
aims, methods and fundamental postulates.
But each science department seems to feel
FORMER MEMBERS of the Merchant
Marine are now being drafted for the
Army, and nobody seems to give a hoot-
except the ex-merchant seamen themselves.
A lot of former servicemen (this writer,
by the way, is a Navy overseas veteran)
are all for it. Didn't Merchant Mariners
pick up fat paychecks and get plenty leave
time whenever they hit port? .
Sure. But the fat-pay argument springs
a few leaks when you figure that it was
subject to the wartime income tax, and re-
member that merchant seamen didn't get
family subsistence allotments or mustering-
out pay or any of the broad benefits of the
GI Bill.
And the leave-time argument lists pretty
badly when you recall that Merchant Ma-
rine duty-after a few weeks or months
of initial training-was exclusively sea duty.
The member of Congress who said that
"those who failed to serve their country
during the war should be made to serve
their sentence now" apparently didn't take
any of this into account. Nor did he re-
member the fact that until mid-1944 Mer-
chant Marine casualties were proportion-
ately higher than Army, Navy or Marine
Corps casualties.
The Army won't be drafting anybody dur-
ing January or February. And the new
Congress is in session. The time is ripe to
give our "unsung heroes in dungarees" an
even break.
-Art Higbee.

that it has at its disposal only one or two
elementary courses in which to teach every-
thing it can think of to everyone it can
get its hands on.
These elementary courses are so detailed
and compartmentalized that, in order to ac-
quire a general background in each of the
major sciences, students would have to take
eight or more courses.
We've been hearing scientists say, ever
since the atomic bomb hit Hiroshima, that
the citizen should know more about sci-
ence. But the science departments here
are apparently unable to get together
on educating even such a small fraction
of the total population as college under-
graduates.
Thus, in Zoology 1, students learn the
eras of geologic time as well as elementary
concepts in chemistry and physics. In Ge-
ology 12 they are presented with a wide
array of biological facts. In Psychology 31
the asgumption is that no one knows any
elementary biological facts.
Each science depends to a Teat extent
on the other sciences. And each elemen-
tary science course apparently undertakes
to teach all the relevant scientific facts,
whether they were discovered by chem-
ists, physicists, biologists or astronomers.
This is commendable but confusing. Sup-
pose, for example, that a student surprises
the department heads by taking both ge-
ology and zoology. He learns biology from a
geologist and geology from a zoologist. There
is nothing more pitiful than a scholar
floundering far from his own bailiwick.
That's not the whole story, either. Sev-
eral science departments apparently haven't
recognized that some students have a pro-
fessional interest in the subject and others
are trying merely to meet the minimum
requirements of general education set by
the college.
It is grossly unfair to shove a future
atomic physicist into the same course with
a rank amateur, or to assume that a pre-
medical student and a prospective history
major need the same biological facts in
the same order.
The present disorganization of science
teaching here grew up over a period of
years, with partial adjustments here and
there to meet new needs. What it needs now
is a general overhauling.
Provisions should be made for future
scientists and for non-scientists. The de-
partments should get together and decide
who is going to teach what.
And a one-year course should be set
up to teach the general concepts and im-
portant facts of all the major sciences-
if the scientists seriously want college grad-
uates to know what science is about.
-Phil Dawson.

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION .. ..
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 17-28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise if the
time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. Evening,
4 o'clock, 5 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may use any of the
periods marked * provided there is no conflict. A final period
on January 28 is available in case no earlier period can be used.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place
of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, no date of examination may be changed without the
consent of the Examination Committee.

TIME OF EXERCISE

1

FDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN:

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuiesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8 ..........................M on.,
9......... ............... Wed.,
10.................. . ..Fri.,
11. ........................ .M on.,
1 ..........................W ed.,
2..........................'Tues.,
3 ..........................Thurs.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17,
19,
21,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

26, 9-12
25, 2- 5
27, 2- 5

8 .......................
9 .... ...................

10.......
11.........
1..........
2..........
3..........

... Tues.,
... Thurs.,
.. .Sat.,
... Tues.,

18,
20,
22,
25,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

..................Thurs.,
.................W ed.,
.................M on.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

Irregulars, make-up, etc................ *Fri.,
SPECIAL PERIODS

Political Science 1
Sociology 51, 54, 90................*Mon. Jan.
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.......... ......*Tues., Jan.
English 1, 2.
Psychology 31 ....................... *Wed., Jan.
Chemistry 1, 3
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101...........*Thurs., Jan.
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 153; Speech 31, 32 ............. *Fri., Jan.
Botany 1; Zoology 1.................*Sat., Jan.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

27, 9-12
26, 2- 5
24, 2- 5
28, 9-12
17, 2- 5
18, 2- 5
19, 2- 5
20, 2- 5
21, 2- 5
22, 2- 5

I

' ,.

DRAMA

I-

( . _. , _

AFTER A LONG succession of comedy and
satire, the speech department has pre-
sented a, serious dramatic work in its pro-
duction of "The Tragical History of Dr.
Faustus," and the result is a satisfying the-
ater experience.
A brilliant performance by John Sargent
in the title role, combined with the highly
imaginative direction of Hugh Norton, the
sets by Jack Bender, and Barbara Hamel's
major league costuming, were the high-
lights of the Play Production's most ambi-
tious attempt in many a moon.
The overall excellence of the presenta-
tion overshadows a spotty first act, In
which the staging and special effects were
impressive enough to overshadow the
acting.
Richard Charlton's unexpected interpret-
ation of Mephistopheles as a calm, good-
natured combination of school teacher and
boon companion, was effective when con-
trasted with Sargent's bombastic "Faustus."
Sargent, in a role that required nearly
two solid hours of stage presence, had his
bad moments during the first act, but over-
came them to deliver Faustus' final solilogy,

(of a man in the final moments of life
praying for time to stand still,) so eloquently
that the entire audience seemed to feel the
minutes running by.
Director Norton and designer Bender rate
a croix-de-guerre for their use of lighting.
The spirits, conjurtd up by Mephistopheles,
moving across the top of the set against a
back drop of vari-hued sky, are all striking.
Mary Jane Holton, (no affront to the
lady's natural beauty intended) thanks to
the lighting and Norton's psychology, is
no disappointment as Helen of Troy. Nor-
ton gives the lady to us strictly in profile,
and when she does turn toward us for a
single moment, she is as beautiful as ad-
vertised.
Only the two or three buriesque scenes
between Wagner, (Laird Brooks) and the
Clown (Robert Tamplin) were conpletell'
unsatisfactory to me. Tamin i's clown was
too Red Skeltonish for my taste, and his
timing was bad, at least ini the first scene.
' It is not a flawless production), but it is
L first rate accomplishment.
IVik ntra us.

Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board at the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 3 and January 8 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive noti-
fication from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 17 to January 28.
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.
TIME OF CLASS TIME OF EXAMINATION

(Continued from Page 2)
tion, call at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
Radcliffe College announces
their Management Training pro-
gram Graduate Fellowships which
provide basic training for women
intending to work at the adminis-
trative level in personnel, business
and industry, government, educa-
tion, and social service. The train-
ing program will start late in Au-
gust, and enrollment is open to a
limited number of college gradu-
ates. Further information may be
obtained at the office of the Bu-
reau of Appointments.
Lectures
University Lecture: Professor G.
A. Borgese, Secretary of the Com-
mittee to Frame a World Consti-
tution, will lecture on "The Mak-
ing of a World Constitution" on
Thurs., Jan. 13, 4:15 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheatre; auspices of,
the Department of Political Sci-
ence.
Mr. G. H. Roderick, of the
American Seating Company,
Grand Rapids, Michigan, will
speak on "Research in Seating"
on Jan. 14, 10 a.m., East Lecture
Room, Rackham Building. Op-
portunity will be given after the
lecture to ask questions and for
conferences.
All furniture students are ex-
pected to attend and other stu-
dents, particularly those following
the Wood Technology Curriculum,
who are interested are welcome to
attend.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Wil-
liam Frank Holmes, Psychology;
thesis: "The Relationship Be-
tween Numerical-Verbal Ability
and Educational and Vocational
Interests," Sat., Jan. 15, East
Council Room, Rackham Bldg.,
1 p.m. Chairman, G. A. Satter.
Seminar in Aplied Mathe-
matics: 4 p.m., Thurs., Jan. 13,
274 W. Engineering Bldg. Profes-
sor Churchill discusses present
state of plans for the Third An-
nual Symposium in Applied
Mathematics.
Department -of Fine Arts: Due
to a mistake in the Time Schedule
or second semester, Fine Arts 1
(Introduction to Art) is num-
'ered Fine Arts 2. Those desiring
to elect this course should enroll
in Fine Arts 1.
Sociology 110, The Rural Com-
munity, will be given the Second
3emester as scheduled, despite the
leath of Prof. Holmes.
R4om assignments for German
1, 2, 31, 32 final examinations,
Tues., Jan. 18, 2-4 p.m.
Berg, B HlI; Bergholz, 2003
AH; Bernard, 101 Ec.; Bigelow,
1225 AH; Eaton, 1025 AH; Fueh-
rer, B HI; Gaiss, 1025 AH; Goet-
:ler, D AMH; Graf, B HH; Hal-
ley, 25 AH; Hascall, 25 AlH; Heil-
bronner, 1025 AH; Mertens, EHH;
Neumann, G H; Norton, 2231
AH; Packer, 203 UH; Pott, 2003
AH; Reed, 3017 AH; Reichart,
201 UH; Thurber, 205 MH; Wil-
ley, 2225 AlH; Yates, 25 AH.
Political Science 52: Final Ex-
amination
Fri;, Jan. 21, 9 a.m.
Section 1. (Knappen) will meet
in 16 A.1-l
Sections 2 and 3 (Eldersveld)
will, meet in 229 AH..
Section 5 (Bretton) will meet in
6 A.HI
Sections 4, 6, 7, and 8 (Vernon
and Abbott) will meet in 102
A.I.
English 1-Final Exauninatiolm

-Wed., Jan. 19, 2-5 p.m.
Amend, 3017 AH; Ball, 3017 AH;
Barrows, 205 MH; Benish, 205
MH; Bennett, 205 MH; Burd, 2054
NS; Chapman, 2003 NS; Culbert,
B Haven; Cox, 2042 NS; Coyle,
3231 AH; Defendini, 2225 AH;
Donaldson, 2225 AH;
D1astman, 1007 AH; Eliot, B
Haven; E. Engel, B Haven; R
Engel, 2203 AH; Felhein, 2203 AH
Ferdian, 2014 AH; Gerlach, 20'
Ec.; Halliday, 1020 AH; Hamp-
ton, 1035 AH; Hawkins, 1035 AH;
Hendricks, 2231 AH; Hill, D Hav-
en; Howard, 2042 NS; Huntley
2225 AH; Kelly, 203 UH; Kowal-
ski, 201 UF-; Layton, 2235 AH;
Lazarus, 215 Ec.; Leonard, I
Haven; Markland, 225 AH; Mark-
man, 16 AH; McCue, 2003 AH
Miller, 25 AH; Moon, 2016 AH
Needham, 2003 AH; Niblett, 400:
Ali; Orel, 104 Ec.; Ostroff, 6 AH
Paterson, 229 AH; Poroda, 21;
AH;; Reeves, 25 AH; Robertsor

NS; Simpson, 2231 AH; Sparrow,
2215 TH; Speckhard, 3209 AH;
Steinhoff, D Alumni; Stockton,
2082 NS; Van Syoc, 2219 AH
Walton, 2042 NS; Weaver, 1025
AH; Weber, 1025 AH; Weimer,
1025 AH; Wells, 4003 AH.
English 2-Final Examination
-Wed., Jan. 19, 2-5 p.m.
Colt, C Haven; Edwards 18 AH;
Madden, C Haven; Millar, 1018
AH; Newman, E Haven; Park, 35
AH; Pearce, 3116 NS; Savage, 35
AH; Shedd, 2013 AH; Walt 2029
AH; Whan, 2011 AH.
Speech 31 & 32 - Final Exami-
nation:
Fri., Jan. 21, 2-5 p.m.
Cairns, 3017 AH; Carruth, 205
MH; Deam, Wat. Gym; Dunn,
2003 AH; Dreher, Wat. Gym;
Flemings (Sec. 12) 2219 AH;
Grosser, 3209 AH; Miller, D-HH;
Okey, 2225 AH; Stegath, 2054 NS;
Quimby, E-HH.
The following sections will have
,the final exam as follows;
Flemings (31-22), Jan. 17, 9-12
a.m., 4203 AH; Manion (31-2)
Jan. 17, 9-12 a.m., 240 T. C. B.;
Manion (31-15), Jan. 18, 9-12
a.m., 4203 AH; Sattler (31-3) Jan.'
19, 9-12 a.m., 4208 AH.
Speech 35 will have final ex-
amination Jan. 25, 2-5 p.m., 25
AH.
Concerts
The Paganini Quartet-14enri
Temianka and Gustave Rosseels,
violins, Robert Courte, viola and
Adolphe Frezin, violoncello-will
give three concerts in the Ninth
Annual Chamber Music Festival,
in the auditorium of the Rackham
Building, Fri., Jan. 14 at 8:30;
Sat., Jan. 15, at 8:30; and Sun.,
Jan. 16, at 2:30.
Friday evening the Quartet will
play the Schubert Quartet in 1-
flat major; Beethoven Quartet in
F major; and the Mozart Quartet
in C major. Saturday evening the
Haydn Quartet in G major, Jacobi
Quartet No. 3, and the Beethoven
Quartet in E-flat major, will be
heard. Sunday afternoon's pro-
gram will consist of the Beethov-
en Quartet in B-flat major, No.
6; the Milhaud No. 7; and the
Franck Quartet in D major.
Tickets are available at the of-
fices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Tower during
the day; and one hour preceding
each concert in the lobby of the
Rackham building.
Student Recital: Barbara Woj-
tyszewski, pianist, will play com-
positions by Mozart, Brahms,
Beethoven, and Franck, at 8 p.m-.,
Thurs., Jan. 13, Rackham. Assem-
bly Hall. The program is present-
ed in partial fulfillment, of the
requirements for the Master of
Music degree, and will be open to
the general public. Miss Wojtys-
zewski is a pupil of Maud Okkel-
berg.
(Continued on Page by

I

1

',

-4

Fifty-Ninth Year
1

I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
Easiest Out

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
'Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8 Mon,
9 .Wed,
10 .. . . . . . ... ri.,
11. . . ... . .. . . ,. .. . . M on.,
1...............Wed.,
2 .......... . .......Tues.,
3..................Thurs.,
8..................Tues.,
9 .................. Thurs.,
10..................Sat.,
11 ..................Tues.,
.................Thurs.,
2 ..................Wed.,
3.................Moll.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17,
19,
21,
24,
26,
25,
27,
18,
20,
22,
25,
27,
26,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Edited and managed by stuaent of
the University of Michigan under the
authority or the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Harriett Friedman ...Managing Editor
Dick Maloy ................City Editor
Naomi Stern .........Editorial Directow
Allega Pasqualetti . ...Assocate Editoi
Arthur Higbeeo.......Associate Editos
Murray Grant..........Sports Edito
Bud Weidenthal ..Associate Sports Ed.
Bev Bussey ......Sports Feature Writer
Audrey Buttery ......Women's Editor
Bess Hayes ...............Librarian,
Business Staff
Rlichard Halt......Business Managet
Jean Leonard ... .Advertising ManageR
William Culman ... Finance _ManageR
Cole Christian ... .Circuation Managet
Telephone 23-24-1

By SAMUEL GRAFTON
THIS, AGAIN, is a story which hasn't
happened, but maybe it could happen.
My imaginary hero is a young man, six
feet tall and polite, who ardently desires a
career in the State Department. He feels
we live in dangerous times, and that the
best service he can render is to work for
world peace. He wants to do it as a pro,
in our diplomatic service.
He buckles down to the studies re-.
quired, history, several languages, a good
bit of economics and commercial geog-
raphy,
And then, one morning, as he is about to
crack the hard chapter on credit instru-
the failure, in some cases, of our judicial
system to withstand the strain of bias
when it is present in virtually every per-
son connected with a particular case.
The guilt or innocence of the defendants
could hardly have been determined by such
a trial.
'rh. --1,t ;,-i- ,mf for iedividual state

ments in his economics text, he notices a
headline in his newspaper. A former tate
Department official has .mst died.
A few days later the President. of Lhe
United States nominates a distinguished
diplomat as Secretary of State. A small up-
roar takes place, in some sectors of Congress
and the press, and there is a burst of ques-
tioning as to whether the nominee believes
perhaps in being "soft," with Russia, and
there is an anxious scanning of all his past
associations.
But it all leaves a peculiar taste in my
hero's mouth. Suddenly he realizes how
completely a political orthodoxy has swept
the country, and how little room there
would be for a truly independent spirit in
the field of our foreign affairs. He himself
has no very high opinion of Russia, re-
garding her with a large distrust, but it
does seem to him that if you are going to
search for peace, you do need some flex -
ibility of approach, and some optimnis
about the possibility of peace. And he
thinks of all the faces, watching, watch-
ing, lest some diplomat make a move

Ch.-Met. 1; M.P. 3, M.P. 4...............*Mon.,
E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 22; Germ.; Span........*..*Tues.,
Eng. 11; Draw. 3; M.E. 135;
Surv. 1, 2.................. ....... *Wed.,
Chem. 1, 3; Ec. 53, 54, 101 .............* *Thurs.,
Draw. 2; E.E. 5; French ...............*Fri.,
Draw. 1; M.E. 13; Phys. 45,
M .E. 136 ...r.e ............. ,.,.*Sat.,
C.E. 21 . .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ,. .. .,. .. .. ...*M on.,
Conflicts and irregular . .. . . .... .. . .. .. . *Fi.,

Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan. 18, 2- 5

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

19,
20,
21,

2-
2-
2-

5
5

22, 2- 5
24, 2- 5
28, 9-12

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Evening, 12 o'clock, 4 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may
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The final period on January 28 is available in case no earlier
period can be used.

-..

I I

102 Ec.; Rogers, 25 AH; Ross 2039

BARNA .f

You'll have to stop this
snowstorm you started,
Mr. O'Mlley, somehow-
e e O e , - . .0

-the latest Weather Bureau
report on the big snowfall-
0 e e
0 ^o, 0 00

_" a a o 'S oa -
-says it definitely will end
sometime this afternoon--
L:..: a a>1(Turn off the radio,

___ L
Cushlamochree! Look! i
Your Fairy Godfather's
powers of concentration
did the trick, Barnaby!

E

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