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September 26, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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LEAHY'S LADS LUCKY:
P d d Burdue's B i f r U set
Fails, IrishWN, 27

SOUTH BEND, Ind.-(AP)-The
Luck 'o the Irish worked overtime
today as desperately-pressed No-
tre Dame outlasted Purdue's Boil-
ermakers, 28-27. It was a classic
football season opener which had
a record 59,343 crowd hysterical
from start to finish at Notre Dame
Stadium.
The Boilermakers, rightfully
boomed as the Big Nine's next
Rose Bowl candidate, battled the
Irish all over the turf and had the
defending National Champions
behind, 13-12, in the third period.
That was the first time Notre
Dame had trailed anybody since
their last defeat, 19 games ago,
when they lost to Great Lakes,
39-7.
THE IRISH dissipated a 12-0
lead which they fashioned early in
second period and it took some
story-book antics to squelch a
splendid Purdue team after that,
including:
1-A bolt-out-of the blue 70-
yard touchdown return of a
punt by sturdy Johnny Panelli,
Morristown, N.J., senior, in the
third period when Notre Dame
was trailing.
2-A 23-yard field goal from
a difficult angle by Steve Oracko

of Lansford, Pa. - whose place
kicking name was mud up until
that moment--for a 21-13 Irish
lead.
3 - A seven - yard pay-off
scamper by Fighting Irishman
Al Ziijewski, an unknown re-
serve tackle from Newark, N.J.,
with an interception of a Bob
DeMoss pass in the fourth quar-
ter, after Purdue had slashed
Notre Dame's lead to 21-20.
And 4 - Oracko's upright-
splitting placement try follow-
ing Zmijewski's touchdown.
Bootin' Steve had missed his
point tries after Notre Dame's
first three touchdowns.
PURDUE'S FOURTH and final
touchdown came even as the clos-
ing gun sounded, on a 6-yard pass
from DeMoss, a brilliant quarter-
back, to end Harley Jeffrey. This
was a game the Boilermakers well
could call a moral victory.
The slashing-viciously-blocking
and tackling Purdues proved all
that Stu Holcomb's fearful Big
Nine coaching rivals feared.
DeMoss passed like a. major
league catcher pegging to second,
setting up all but one of Purdue's
four touchdowns with his sharp-
shooting.

S S
SP O RT S
MERLE LEVIN, Night Editor
- M O W
Wildcats Drub
On LongGains
LOS ANGELES - (P) - North-
western sank the Bruins of UCLA,
19-0, today with two spectacular
long range scoring explosions and!
a rockwall defense.
Quarterback Don Burson
dropped back and fired an arch-
ing pass some 46 yards to his left
end, Joe Zuravleff, who stepped
across the goal line for the first
touchdown in the second quarter
Midway in the third quarter
Gasper Perricone, a 200-pound re-
serve fullback from Denver, got
loose for 50 yards and a touch-
down.
The third score, just before the!
game ended, was anti-climatic.
The alert Wildcat secondary inter-
cepted a Bruin pass and in seven
plays crunched out 29 yards, with
fullback Art Murakowski going
over tackle for the last six yards.

Handsome Jack Kramer eased
the first place traffic jam in the
American League today when he
elbowed New York out of a triple
tie with a 7-2 victory that gave
the Boston Red Sox half the lead-
ership with Cleveland.
The 30-year-old righthander
was in complete charge most of
the way. Not a ball was hit to the
outfield until the sixth and only
seven ventured into that foreign
territory during an afternoon of
heartbreak for 65,607 Yankee
customers.
A grey-haired old gaffer named
Wally Moses, who celebrates his
37th birthday in a couple of weeks,
continued his chosen role of Yan-
kee-baiter with two hits and three
runs, one his second homer of
the season. It came off Bob Por-
terfield shortly after he replaced
starter and loser Allie Reynolds
in the sixth.
S, * *
GENE BEARDEN, the pitcher
the New York Yankees gave up on
two years ago, kept the Cleveland
Indians in a tie with Boston for
the American League lead today
when he hurled the Tribe to a 9-3
victory over the Detroit Tigers.
The triumph gave Cleveland
92 victories against 56 defeats,
the same as the Red Sox who
knocked the Yankees out of a

di ans o~l i irs -3
eme r
Inin onTo Re'na in in Ttefo irt

three-w/ay tiny into third place,
one full game behind when they
whipped the Bronxites in their
back yard, 7-2.
Bearden limited the Tigers to
seven hits in registering his 17th
victory against only seven defeats
in his first full season in the major
leagues. It was his third straight
against Detroit without a setback.
THE NEW YORK Giants spoiled
Boston's chances of clinching the
National League flag by defeat-
ing the Braves 3-2 before 15,377
fans.
The Braves wasted several
scoring opportunities and errors
preceded the scoring of the sec-
ond and third Giant runs. John-
ny Sain, mnaking his 10th start
in 33 days, suffered his 15th de-
feat. He has won 22 games.
It was a tough defeat for Sain
whose great pitching in the last
few weeks was a major factor in
the Tribe climb well ahead of the
rest of the league.
IN OTHER daylight games in
the National League, the last-
place Chicago Cubs scored three
times in the ninth inning to just
about end the penant hopes of
the St. Louis Cardinlas ';by dgiing
the Red Birds 3-2.
Howie P'oL'et had a two hit
shutout going into the final
frame, but gave up four singles
in the fateful ninth, including
pinch hingles by the Bruin's Hal
Jef'fcoat and lthank 8 chenz.
Polett'sr,'c'ord nee v, sads at I13
wills and losses. joiyle Lade
notched his fifth victory, as he
feld the Cards scoreless unti
the eig-hth inning.
At Pittsburgh the Bucs out-
slugged the Cincinnati beds, 16-6,
as rookie hurler Bob Chesnes
hung up his 14th win of the year.
The youthful Pirate ace has lost
only five.

Bears Clash
With Packers'
In Grid attle
NEW YORK - (P) - Although
the All-America Football Confer-
ence has six mid-season games
scheduled tomorrow and the older
National League offers only two
early-seasoncontests, theh60th
struggle between the Chicago
Bears and Green Bay 'Packers
takes precedence over all the rest.
They'll meet in Green Bay, Wis.,
tomorrow in the first game of the
year for the Bears and the first
teal test for the highly-regarded
Packers. The other National
League game brings together the
injury-riddled Pittsburgh Steelers
and the Washington Redskins at
Washington.
* * *
THE ALL-AMERICA Confer-
Ince slate sends both of that cir-
cuit's undefeated teams, the San
Francisco 49'ers and the Cleveland
Browns into action. San Francisco,
winner of four straight, visits Buf-
falo while Cleveland, unbeaten in
three starts, plays at home against
the Chicago Rockets.
The Baltimore Colts, leaders of
the Eastern Division, take on
Brooklyn at Baltimore. A fourth
Conference game this week sends
the New York Yankees, under the
new leadership of Red Strader, to
Los Angeles to play the Dons

EAST'
Cornell 47, New York Univer-
sity 6.
Army 28, Villanova 0.
Columbia 27, Rutgers 6.
Maine 13, Rhode Island.State 7.
West Virginia Tech 20, Shep-
erd 12.
Southern Methodist 33, Pitts-
burgh 14.
Yale 28, Brown 13.
Coast Guard Academy 20,
Arnold 0.
Brooklyn College 24, New
Haven (Conn.) Teachers 0.
Colby 14, American Interna-
tional 0.
Bowdoin 28, Tufts 7.
California 21, Navy 7.
Colgate 25, University of Buf-
falo 0.
Amherst 26, Rochester 6.
Holy Cross 18, Georgetown 7.
Gettysburg 28, Drexel 0.
Lafayette 53, Fordham 14.
Bucknell 29, Alfred 6.
Williams 14, Norwich 0.
Massachusetts 7, Bates 6.
Lincoln 60, Army Chemical
Center (Md.) 0.
Franklin & Marshall 13, Le-
high 12.
West Virginia University 34,
Wooster 6.
Susquehanna 13, CCNY 7.

Nebraska 19, Iowa State 15.
Baldwin-Wallace 20, Ohio
Wesleyan 13.
Denison 38, Otterbein 7.
Bowling Green 13, Ohio U. 7.
Knox 7, North Central 0.
Washington (St. Louis) 19, St.
Louis School of Mines 7.
Valparaiso 19, Luther (Decor-
ah, Ia..) 6.
Carleton College 20, Beloit 0.
Lawrence 28, Grinnell 0.
Olivet 14, Grand Rapids 0.
St. Cloud (Minn.) Teachers 27,
Univ. of Manitoba 0.
Texas Christian University 21,
Oklahoma. A&M 14.
' SOUTH
Duke 0, North Carolina State 0.
Georgia Tech 13, Vanderbilt 0.
Furman 10, Washington & Lee
7.
North Carolina 34, Texas 7.
Georgia 14, Chattanooga 7.
Mississippi State 21, Tennessee
6.
Miami (O.) 14, Virginia 14 (tie).
Tulane 21, Alabama 14.
Virginia Military Institute 28,
Catawba 6.
George Washington 13, Vir-
ginia Tech. 0.
FAR WEST
Wyoming 61, Colorado College
7.

Football Scores

Montana State 33, North Da-
MIDWEST kota State0.
Notre Dame 28, Purdue 27. Santa Clara 20, Oklahoma 17.
Iowa 14, Marquette 12. Northwestern 19, UCLA 0.
Indiana 35, Wisconsin 7. Oregon 20, Stanford 12.
Illinois 40, Kansas State 0. Minnesota 20, Washington 0.
Ohio State 21, Missouri 7. New Mexico 9, Colorado 6.

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