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January 12, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

't G S

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 19111

i

PAESI EDEDAJAURY1,_91

NEW PARTY LINE:
Wired Radio Network To
Make Stockwell Debut

By JIM BROWN
Culminating several months of
frustrating attempts . to secure
the necessary broadcasting equip-
ment and transmitting head-
-iarters, wired radio has finally
come to the campus.
With the initial broadcast from
the West Quad to Stockwell Hall
scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday night
ie plan, which has been little
,nore than a dream in the minds
Deadline Set
For Return of
Loan Prints
Students who rented art prints
this semester should return tbem
to Rm. 142 in the basemen of the
Administration Building by Jan.
18.
Mrs. Eloise Wilkinson, who is
in charge of the Student Loan
Prints, reminded students yester-
day that a fee of five cents will be
charged for each day pictures are
over-due.
THlE PRINTS, which were
complete "sell-outs" this semes-
ter, will again be exhibited the
week of Jan. 30 in the West Gal-
lery of the Museum of Art.
They will be reassigned dur-
ing the week of Feb. 7 and will
be distributed the following
week from Rm. 142, Adminis-
tration Building.
Fifty-six new framed prints-
were purchased with student ren-
tal fees and added to the collec-
tion during the past semester.
INCLUDING works of. Cezanne,
Renoir, Corot, Vermeeri and
Burchfield, they bring the collec-
tion's total to 670.

Df a group of radio-minded men
n the West Quad, will become
reality.
WIRED RADIO was first in-
roduced on the campus last year
vhen Brad Stone, '51, Ward Cor-
'-elius, '51, and Fred Remley, '51,
*;ioneered the first successful sta-
tion in the West Quad.
At the same time Dean Bar-
nard, '50, was organizing an as-
sociation which hoped to bring
wired radio to the entire cam-
pus.
A lack of fundsand equipment
temporarily halted work on the
project, but this year, with the
assistance of the University
Broadcasting Service, the first
experimental line has been set up.
ONE TRANSMITTER, owned
by Sheldon Gates, '51E, is located
in 411 Chicago House and the
other, furnished by Jerry Swan-
tek, chief studio engineer of the
Broadcasting Service, is operat-
ed by remote control in Stock-
well.
The wire running between
the two dorms was installed by
under the direction of Waldo
the Broadcasting Service which,
Abbott, is working with the
group.
Programs transmitted over the
wire are fed into the power lines
~f the individual houses and can
be picked up only on radios locat-
ed in those houses. They originate
from the West Quad Radio Net-
work, comprised of stations in
Michigan, Allen-Rumsey and Chi-
cago Houses.
Permanent headquarters for
the Wired Radio Association have
been provided in the fifth floor of
the new Administration Building.

Photograph
Competition
Ends Friday
All entries in the 1949 Michi-
ganensian Photo Contest must be
to Rm. 142 in the basement of the
contest officially closes.
When all the pictures are in they
will be turned over to the con-
test judges, Jean Leonard, Daily
Advertising Manager; Alex Lman-
ian, 'Ensian photography editor,
and Pete Elliott. Their decision
will be final.
THE WINNER will be an-
nounced during the first week of
the spring semester. He will re-
ceive a delux, table model "radio.
Bill Osterman, 'Ensian assis-
tant promotions manager, said
that he was very well satisfied
with the reception the contest is
receiving from the students.
The pictures are coning very
nicely and we believe there is
enough material for the proposed
candid photo section in the 1949
'Ensian, Osterman went on to
say.
* * *
ENTRIES MVAY be turned in
to the 'Ensian office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building. A
negative is not required, the print
will suf fice.
All entries become the property
of the Michiganensian.
Will Discuss
Job outlook

Financial
Aid Given
Iceserviiig Studets
Eligible for Grants
Financial aid for students
showing genuine need and prom-
ise of outstanding achievement
will again be provided this year
by the Student Aid Foundation of
Michigan, Dean Erich A. Walter
announced yesterday.
Application for aid may be ob-
tained at the Office of Student
Affairs, 1020 Administration
Building, and should be filed be-
fore Feb. 21.
FIFTY-FOUR students attend-
ing the University were given aid
by the Foundation for 1948-49.
Grants are given only to can-
didates who live or attend col-
lege fairly near Detroit.
Although residence in the area
is not a requirement for eligibility,
trustees of the Foundation make
grants only to individuals with
whom they can maintain personal
interviews.
*K
AID FROM the Foundation is
extended to students of outstand-
ing promise who have definite
purpose and plan on continuing
their education but need financial
help,
Other qualifications are phys-
ical fitness, personality, sound-
ness ofcharacter, social con-
sciousness, and work experience.
The Foundation, which was or-
ganized in 1939, is supported by
the McGregor fund and other
donors.

By DON McNEIL
Rainy weather doesn't seem to
be an ideal condition for a scien-
tist's best field work, but Prof.
Alexander H. Smith thrives on it.
Prof. Smith, potanist in the
University Herbarium, has been
collecting mushrooms in the west-
ern United States for 15 years,
during which time he has irri-
tated many a tourist by continu-
ally wishing for rain.
* * *
MUSHROOMS FRUIT errati-
cally but mostly during wet
weather, Prof. Smith reports,
ROTC Hikes Pay
Campus ROTC students in ad-
vanced classes have a lot to be
happy about as the result of a re-
cent pay hike.
An eleven-cent salary increase
has gone into effect, which means
junior and senior ROTC men re-
ceive 90 cents instead of the pre-
vious 79-cent daily wage. Pay-
-ments are retroactive to last Sept.

"and you never know ahead of
time how many you will find."
Mushroom hunting is more
than a hobby to Prof. Smith,
who has the task of collecting
and classifying the fleshy fungi
of the western part of the coun-
try.
He estimates that his manual
of mushroom flora will contain
around 2,000 species when com-
pleted.
* * *
THE COLLECTING for the
project was begun by Prof. C. H.
Kauffman, back in 1915, and has
been continued by Prof. Smith
since 1935. He has been going
back to his mushroom grounds
fairly regularly since, except dur-
ing the war.
"On expeditions I take along
as little equipment as possi-
ble," he says, describing his
field trips.
"For studies in the field, usu-
ally a tourist cabin, a microscope,
drying equipment, and dark room
facilities for photography are the
main requirements."

Botanist Beams as Rainfall
Makes Mushrooms Grow

,

CHECK 1950 BUDGET-Rep. Charles Halleck (Rep., Ind.) (left)
and Rep. John Taber (Rep., N.Y.) take a look at the 1950 budget.
(On page one, University public finance experts discuss the diffi-
culty of making any substantial cuts in the budget.)
FOOD FOR THOUGHT:
Waitresses Give Lowdown
On Students' Pet Table Talk

Here is a Real Sale!

Placement opportunities

for

C/iaie ou fi an rL4tek
Wind and Weather
LOTION
Calkins-Fletcher
presents the annual C
HALF-PRICE SALE fJ
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Available at this exceptional savings for a limited time
SCalkins-Fletcher Drug Stores
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o m s <--oO t ) t m t) t ) r ) O
/;% -6

students will be analyzed tonight'I
Jamison, of the BusAd. school.
will speak at an open panel dis-
cussion sponsored by Delta Sig-
ma Pi, national business frater-
nity.
The meeting will be Jaeld at 8
p.m., in Rm. 130, of the BusAd.
school.
The speakers will each give a
short resume of employment con-
ditions in their respective fields,
and then the discussion will be
opened up to the audience. Mod-
erator will be Prof. Charles LA.
Jamison, of the Bus.Ad. school.
Campus
Calendar
Mental n<-o
tional films "Emotional Health"
and "Fc' ling of 'ejcetiwi," 4:10
p.m., Audio Visual Fdlucational
Center, Kellogg Auditorium.
Speech lecture -"Speech as a
Science" by Dr. Martin F. Palm-
er, 4 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.

By DON KOTITE"
Don't spill your inmost secretsc
over that friendly cup of coffee
-a Daily survey shows that wait-
resses as well as walls have ears.
The object of the survey, con-
ducted through interviews with
local countermen and waitresses,
was to discover the favorite con-
versational topics of hamburger-
munching students.
* *k k
NEARLY ALL those interviewed
agreed on one point-they main-
tained that coeds spend most of
their lunch hour picking the males
apart.
"With women it's men first
and foremost, then clothes. Fel-
lows seem to discuss more se-
rious subjects," declared one
soda clerk.
Topics discussed range from the
opposite sex to homework and
"blue book blues," servers pointed
out.
ONE SYMPATHETIC waitress
noted that groups sometimes be-
come so engrossed in conversation
she "hates to disturb them to take
their order."
Anoter observed definite
studelnt trend to lwsychology and
psychiatry. She toldis of a
certain male who enitejs her
place only to discuss the psy-
chology of marriage with her.
"A;yIhc tiruc hc leaves, I'tni
running around, in circles," she
sighed.

'U'-goers, and several spots have
capitalized on them.
A cafeteria owner actually redid
interior decoration on the basis
of one student's suggestions, it was
discovered.

..RS(ij,. .h, nv'
" "
S . j'k
,[,
.' "

OUR ENTIRE
SUIT STOCK IS NOW
ON SALE IN
TWO GROUPS.

536

in topcoats you will find
many values in coverts
and gabardines,

from $3395

and $4S

I

up

[

Some with
zip-out linings

ALL SALES FINAL

ALTERATIONS AT COST

mEflZ TOGGERY
521 E. Liberty Michigan Theatre Bldg.

303 NORTH FIFTH AVE

U

momm1

4?001 l/CI '

Lectu re-'Botanical Studies in IN GENERAL, showing-off and
the Port Radium Region of Great boisterousness are frowned upon.
Bear Lake, Northwest Territory" But, according to one observer,
by Prof. William C. Steere, 8 p.m., "Loud patrons are as far between
Rackham Amphitheatre. as the tips."
--The survey shows a student
EIuca in .i1'wnes tendency to rave if a restaur-
I. ant's price scale is lower than
EAST LANSING, Mici ..lh-ic average. Very few eateries boast
world's first agricultural collec, of the five-cent cup of Java, and
was founded al llohenheimn, Ger- coffee trade there is "more than
many, in 1818. terrific," asserted the counter
In the United States, the first is help.
believed to be Gardner's Academy, Constructive comments on serv-
founded in Maine in 1823. ice and architecture are offered by

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