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January 09, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S JDA, j AONARY 9, 1949

THE

a::an ya . . . .i v -a 14 ar . a 1.Z t4 d

Plicksters

Edgwe

Queens

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ien Fall to I1ni
'k 'Grapplers Smothered
d le In Conference Opener, 25-3

Conference Basketball

I

COLUMBUS, 0.- (A') --Ohio
State weathered a mid-third-
quarter Northwestern rally suc-
cessfully last night to open its
1949 Big Nine basketball season
with a 68 to 56 victory over the
Wildcats.
* * *
THE BUCKEYES got off on the
victory side before a crowd of
6,065 in the Fairgrounds Colise-
um.
After trailing at halftime,
32-24, the underdog Wildcats
came back with a fine streak of
rebounding and shooting to
take the lead at 40-39 on a long
push shot by Jim Barr with less
than 12 minutes of the third.
period to play.
The Bucks got back the lead at
42-41, lost it again at 43-42 and
trailed at one time 44-42. Then
Center Bob Raidiger hooked in a
"line drive" to tie it up. "Dead
Eye Dick" Schnittker put it on
ice with a goal and a free throw
for a lead Ohio never relinquish-
ed.
BLOOMINGTON, IND.-(P)-
Detroit Takes
Montreal, 4-4
Wings Lead League;
Toronto, Chicago Tie
MONTREAL - (.4)-- The De-
troit Red Wings racked up two
goals in the first period last night
against Montreal Canadiens, then
coasted to a 4-1 win over the
Montrealers and repossession of
first place in the National Hockey.
League.
Bud Poile and Sid Abel put the
wings ahead with goals in the
opening period.
The Canadiens got one goal
back early in the second period
when Jack Stewart was sitting out
a penalty for the Wings. Billy
Reay, spearhead of the Montreal
attack all night, drove a hard shot
past Harry Lumley, on assists
from Glen Harmon and Joe Car-
veth.
* * *
TORONTO-The Toronto Ma-
ple Leafs moved into a fourth-
place tie in the National Hockey
League race last night when they
came from behind to earn a 3-3
tie with the thrird-place Chicago
Blackhawks. It was the seventh
tie for the Leafs this season and
the third for the Hawks.

Substitute Fred Green hit a field
goal in the last split-second of a
second overtime period last night
to give Illinois a 44-42 Big Nine
basketball victory over Indiana.
It was the 50th game between
the universities and a capacity
crowd of 10,013 saw a contest
as tight as any in the long ser-
ies. The result kept Illinois on
top of the Western Conference
standings with two victories.
The scoic was 37-all when the
regular playing period ended and
40-all after the first overtime.
Green, a six-foot seen-inchv re-
serve center, sank the game-win-
ning hook shot from about 20 feet
out. The same gangling but
nerveless youngster tossed the
basket that gave Illinois a 52-51
ictoryv oer Indiana here last sea-
son. His decisive basket tonight
was his only fielder of the game
and he sat out the entire second
half of the regular playing per-
iod.
IOWA CITY, IA.-A'P)-Pur-
due' Boilermakers staged a fast
finish to down Iowa 73-53 tonight
in the first Western Conference
basketball game for both teams.
Purdue had only a 30-27 half-
timc lead.
The Boilermakers, paced by
the red-hot shooting of How-I
ard Williams who had a game
total of 25 points, including
nine field goals, out-classed the
Hawks in the final half.
Purdue's defense was too rug-
ged for Iowa and the visitors con-
trolled the rebounds as they
cracked a three - game losing
streak.
Iowa was ahead early in the
first half but after Purdue pulled
up to a 16-all count the Hawks
never regained the front spot.
Tony Guzowski of Iron Moun-
tain, Mich., was the top scorer for
Iowa with 14 points, 10 in the
first half.
MADISON, Wis.-The Univer-
sity of Wisconsin overwhelmed
Creighton, 75-30, in a rather dull
basketball game witnessed by 13,-
00 persons.
oach Harold (Bud) Foster
used 19 players in the one-sided
game and 13 of them broke into
the scoring column.
The Badgers hopped right off
into the lead and kept going, lim-
iting the Omaha team to three
baskets in the first half while
Wisconsin rolled up a 40-14 half-
time score.

McIntyre's 20
Points Leads
Gopher Attack
(Continued from Page 1)
last year when he led the Wol-
verines in scoring. He collected
only six points in last night's af-
fair.
Boyd McCaslin, hampered by
his injured ankle, made just one
shot from the floor and com-
bined with three foul shots gave
him a total of only five to add
to the fading Wolverine cause.
Bill Roberts found McIntyre a
match for him, and was able to
get but two counters by the tow-
ering Gopher center.
Pete Elliott, who was assigned
to guarding the flashy Minnesota
forward, Skoog, accounted for
four points. Bill Mikulich rounded
out the Wolverine total with a
field goal and a foul shot.
OZZIE COWLES spared noth-
ing as he sent Minnesota to their.
ninth straight win, this one over
the team he guided to the top on-
ly last season.
This aggregation differs.
greatly from the style he fol-
lowed during his two-year stay
at Michigan. Whereas the Wol-
verine team was composed of
"everybody a threat" men, his
undefeated quintet at Minne-
apolis is a two-man team.
This was proven very vividly
last night as it was Skoog and
McIntyre who teamed together to
hand the Wolverines a loss in
their first game of the Conference
season.
* * *
THE OTHER SEVEN men used
last night by Cowles scored a
combined total of. nine points,
four of them didn't score at all.
Bud Grant got two, Harold
Olson got two more, Ernie Salo-
vich sank a field goal, and Bud
Mitchell was high man in this
quartet with three points.
Michigan will go for its first
Conference visitory tomorrow
night when they play Purdue at
West Lafayette.

Maize and Blue Fight Way
Extending Unbeaten Streak,
Waily Gacek Is Injured Early in Contest;
Action-Packed Fight Is Feature of Gaie

Tr
Se(

By B. S. BROWN
It was touch and go the whole
way last night, and at one time
the Wolverine fans even threat-
ened to tear the shaky, old Coli-
seum apart, buy at the final whis-
tle, the Michigan hockey squad
had extended its unbeaten string
to 20 games.
Queens University started off
fast, tallying its first goal before
two minutes of the first period
had elapsed, but the Wolverines
struck back for three goals in the
initial stanza, a pair in the middle
frame, and a final tally in the
third period to edge the visitors.
6-5.
PLAYING WITHOUT the serv-
ices of wingman Wally Gacek,
who injured his right knee early
in the contest, the Wolverines

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Box Score
MICHIGAN G F PF TP
McCaslin, f 1 3 2 5
Suprunowicz, f 3 0 2 6
Roberts, c 2 0 3 4
Elliott, g 2 0 3 4
Harrison, g 4 1 0 9
Morrill, f 0 0 0 0
Wisniewski, c 0 0 2 0
Mikulich, f 1 1 0 3
Vanderkuy, 0 0 1 0
Doyle, f 0 0 0 0
TOTALS .........13 5 13 31
MINNESOTA G F PF TP
Skoog, f 7 2 1 16
Grant, f 1 0 1 2
McIntyre, c 8 4 0 20
Mitchell, g 1 1 3 3
Olson,g 1 0 3 2
Salovich, g 1 0 0 2
Ekberg, c 0 0 0 0
Skrien, f 0 0 1 0
Kranz, g 0 0 1 0
Bergstedt, g 0 0 0 0
TOTALS .........19 7 10 45
HALFTIME SCORE: Mihi-
gan 16, Minnesota 24.
Free Throws Missed: Michigan
-McCaslin 3, Suprunowicz 2.
Afinnesota-McIntyre 5, Mitchell
2, Olson, Salovich.

WALLY GRANT
.scores first goal j
were forced to overcome a two
goal deficit in the first period and
three ties to remain in the un-
defeated ranks.
Each team tallied in the final
period but the play slowed down
considerably from the tempo set
in the first few minutes of play.
With 18 seconds left in the con-
test, Queens coach Gene Chouin-
ard pulled his goalie and sent six
forwards on the ice in an at-
tempt to knot the count, but ex-
pert clearing by the Wolverine
sextet prevented the visitors from
getting one shot in on goal.
THERE WERE 11 .penalties
called by the officials, five of
them sending Michigan players
into the box, but it was a call by
referee Ace Lee in the second pe-
riod that brought the fans to their
feet for a five-minute cat-calling
session.
Moon Flanigan, Queen de-
fenseman pounced on Ross
Smith and began pummeling
him about the face and head.
Before the officials could inter-
fere, Smith's partner on de-
fense, Dick Starrak, raced over,,
grabbed the husky Canadian
Sate Drug Co.
State and Packard
ICE CREAM - LUNCHES
DRUGS

and began to dish out much of
the same treatment that had
been accorded Smith.
When the officials finally halt-
ed the action, which threatened to
turn into a riot with all 12 of the
players on the ice taking part,
Smith, Starrak and Flanigan were
waved off the ice, but not with-
out the fans vigorously protest-
ing the penalty tagged on Smith,
whose most strenuous action was
the holding of his hands over his
head to ward off FElanigan's blows.
RON JOHNSTONE, starting de-
fenseman for the visitors, netted
the first goal at 1:54 of the in-
itial period on a 45-footer into
the righ corner.
Michigan had its first oppor-
tunity of the game a few min-I
utes later when Johnstone was
penalized two minutes for in-
terference, but Queens grabbed
the initiative to rack up its sec-
ond tally.
Dn Murray, speedy first line
center grabbed the puck, outraced
Smith to the Michigan blue line,
and shot the disk by Wolverine
goalie Jack McDonald at 5:34 as
the net-tender left the crease to
cover.
WALLY GRANT put the home
sextet back in the game a minute
later beating Queen goalie Norm
Uric on a short blast. Al Renfrew
and Gordie McMillan were given
the assists.
At 7:50 of the same frame,
Gil Burford, second line wing,
took a lift from defenseman
Connie hill and beat the Queen
goalie for Michigan's second
goal.
McMillan and Renfrew teamed
on a beautiful play 38 seconds
later to put the Wolverines ahead
for the first time in the game.
DON KEENLEYSIDE tied
thins up in the closing seconds
of the period when he beat Mc-
Donald after taking a flip from
Pat McCafferty on a five footer.
Starrak and Al Bassey who
subbed for the ailing Gacek, gave
Michigan its two goals in the
middle frame, but McCafferty
kept the visitors in the running
when he pumped in a rebound.
Bassey's goal was his first of the
season.
Neil Celley wrapped up the
Michigan scoring in the final
frame when he ruffled the nets
after taking passes from Hill and
Grant. Don Murray scored again
for Queens, but his efforts
amounted to a consolation tally.
Tedi Coacdies
Lose Football
Jobs in '49
NEW YORK - -(')-The rough
and rocky 1948 football season
had its repercussions in coaching
ranks. At least ten major college
tean will have new top taelicians
next fall.
There have been shakeups at
State, Nebraska, Duquesne, Wash-
ington & Lee, Carnegie Tech, Vir-
ginia Military Institute, Cincin-
nati and Montana.
One of the oldest coaching con-
nections was severed when Harry
A. Stuhldreher, under some heavy
student pressure, quit as head
mentor at Wisconsin but kept his
post as athletic director.
Stuhldreher, the last of Notre
Dame's famed "Four Horsemen"
still active in the profession, had
led the Badgers in football for 13
years. But, his last one was disas-
trous-two victories and seven de-
feats and the cellar spot in West-
ern Conference standings.
Wisconsin is reported interested
in Charles (Bud) Wilkinson, Ok-
lahoma head coach, as successor.

But a new five-year contract at
$15,000 per is expected to keep
Wilkinson at home.

INDOOR
Jan. 28-Michigan AAU, here.
Feb. 5-MSC Relays, there.
Feb. 12-Cornell, here
Feb. 19-Illinois-Purdue, there.
Feb. 26-Ohio State, here.
Mar. 4-5-Conference Meet at
Champaign.
Mar. 12-Illinois Tech Relays
at Chicago.
OUTDOOR
April 26-To Be Filled, here
April 29-30-Penn Relas, at
Philadelphia.
May 7-Indiana-Purdue,
there.
May 14-Illinois, here.
May 20-21-Conference Meet
at Evanston.
May 26-Ohio State, there.
'Kept on Ice,'
'Still GoStale
By BEV BUSSEY
Sports Feature FEditor
At 3:30 yesterday afternoon, the
Michigan hockey team stepped off
the train, ending a time-and-a-
half overtime Xmas vacation.
The unexpected extra week was
spent trying to beat the snow
storm in Green River, Wyoming,
a two-by-nothing town where the
train was being serviced for three
days.
S* . w
"There were a few other trains
also on the way back from Cali-
fornia held up in Green River. We
met the Cornell football team and
the Drakeibasketball outfit," Con-
nie Hill said. (Not to mention the
Smith, Northwestern, and Welles-
ley coeds.)
Similar to the sporting nature
of Las Vegas, Nevada, the fron-
tier town offered poor facilities
for the team to practice-only a
dinky outside skating rink that
wasn't kept up too well. So al-
though "kept on ice" the Wol-
verine skaters lost some sharp-
ness.
"Most of the boys took a few
cracks at the books, but the num-
ber of roving inebriates made any
serious attempts at studying al-
most impossible. The lights were
in bad shape, so we ate our sup-
pers by candlelight," Bill indicat-
ed.
WHILE IN California, the
Michigan crew watched the Rose
Bowl game. About seven appeared
on a television show in Los An-
geles, but the only tell-tale signs
of the trip out West are a couple
ten-gallon chapeous worn by
goalie Jack MacDonald, and Hill.
y o Istruetive
wheel coditions8
but the owcners don't );how it!
Tires, springs and shock absorbers
take the beating, vibration and
grinding of unbalanced and mis-
aligned wheels. That is why most
drivers don't know when destruc-
tive wheel conditions are stealing'
rubber and aging the car beyond
its mileage.
The SAFE, sure way is to have us
check wheels regularly. Then we
can detect and correct destructive
wheel conditions before serious
damage occurs.

FITZGERALD-

By BOB VOKAC
A power-laden Illinois wrest-
ling club exploded in Yost Field
House last night to trim the Wol-
verines, 25-3. in the initial mat
card of the 1949 season.
Illinois, the jinx team for
Michigan, winning now 10 out of
12 matches from the Maize and
Blue, lived up to its advance bill-
ing by taking every match except
one.
CAPTAIN BOB Betzig provided
the only light in the Michigan
trouncing by taking a decision
from Illini Norm Patterson in the
155 pound bout.
Displaying terrific power, the
Orange and Blue appeared
fresh after tieing the Spartans
of Michigan State, 13-13, Fri-
day night. Last season, Michi-
igan State was runner up in the
NCAA finals.
The initial match of the even-
ing featured a Michigan new-
comer, Jack Keller, against Dick
Picard in the 121 pound tilt. Af-
ter a slow, bottled up match, the
Indian Picard took a decision
over Keller.
THE 128 pound feature wit-
nessed Illinois taking a close de-
cision as Dale Nelson edged out
Michigan letterman Byron Dead,
3-2.
One of Illinois' two falls was
scored in the 136 pound at-
asketball Scores
Brown 47, Army 42
LaSalle 63, Holy Cross 61
Syracuse681, Lawrence Tech 39
West Virginia 71, Niagara 66
Loyola 58, St. Johns 55
Marshall 71, Indiana St. 63

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