100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG1~ POUft

THE MICHIGAN DAILY:

'RATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1949

1

DECAY MAY STAY:
'U' Expert Calls Dental
Aid Report Premature

The Senator Was Indiscreet?

By FRAN IVICK
A national magazine's sensa-
tional report of a new treatment
which insures against 90 per cent
of tooth decay, was deemed pre-
mature by a University dental au-
thority.
The new method, in which the
teeth are coated with a fast-hard-
ening precipitate, was formulated
by Baylor University Dr. Bern-
hard Gottlieb, a former member
of the University dental school
Worker Voice
In Slinervision

faculty, according to Dr. Floyd D.
Ostrander, professor of dentistry.
"SO FAR," Dr. Ostrander said,
"the treatment hasn't been tried
on enough people to prove any-
thing. The report should have
first appeared in a scientific jour-
nal, with popular publication held
off until tests were conclusive."
The new treatment should be
tried on hundreds of people be-
fore it can be accepted as ef-
fective, according to Ostrander,
who said that many other fac-
tors may have caused the de-
cline of decay in the patients
treated.

"At any rate, I doubt that the
O u p t new precipitate is actually 90 per
Oi tls I cn effective," Dr. Ostrander de-
Raises cent a e'rass :
clared. "Right now we have meth-
Workers produce more if they ods of slowing decay by silver ni-
have a share in management a trate or fluorine swabbing, and
meeting of city managers from all these are proved treatments."

I

Speech Play
Opens Here
Wednesday
Employing some of the most
spectacular production techniques
in the history of the University
theatre productions, the Depart-
ment of Speech will present "The
Tragical History of Doctor Faus-
tus," on Jan. 12 through 15.
Written by Christopher Mar-
lowe in 1589, the play has sel-
dom been done in recent years but
received the unanimous acclaim
of the critics when produced by.
Orson Wells on Broadway as a
Federal Theatre project. The
noted Old Vic Theatre Company
is including it in their current
repertoire.
"DR. FAUSTUS" is the story of
a German philosopher who sells
his soul to the devil in exchange
for universal knowledge. Many
scenes are centered in the realm
of the supernatural and the en-
tire play is written in verse.
One of the most unique in-
novations in the production
which is under the direction of
Dr. Hugh Norton will be the use
of special off-stage musical ef-
fects. Special music has been
composed especially for this
performance by Edward Chuda-
coff of the University School of
Music.
Another feature of the produc-
tion will be a group of original
dances directed by Dr. Juana
Laban of the Physical Education
Department.
Tickets for the play will go on
sale at the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office Monday, Jan. 10 with mail
orders being received now. A spe--
cial student rate will be in effect
for the Wed. and Thurs. per-
formances.

EDITOt'S NOTE-This is another
in a series of articles on men's hon-
orary societies at the University as1
prepared by Janet Watts.
The Pharoah mave have his
eye on you.
. If you are a sophomore man in
the literary, education, business
administration, or forestry school
and aritive in campus affairs, you
may be eligible for Sphinx, cam-
pus honor society.
*~ * *
ABOUT 25 of these men are se-
lected each spring by the groups
for tapping. For initiation the
new men must scrub Angell Hall
steps arid generally undergo a

'rough hazing" which includes
bowing before an image of Sphinx
set into the wall of the Angell
Hall lobby.
The society, which was in-
active during the war, has now
returned to its pre-war status.
The main project of the year is
to "get imderwtiy," said Presi-
dent Gus Stager.
"Our main idea is to .give the
initiative to changes in the cam-
pus scene which would better the
University," he said.
Sphinx members may be iden-
tified by the small gold pin in the
shape of a Pharoah head.

HAIL TO PHARAOH:
Sphinx To Stalk Sophomore
Men inSpring Honors Tap

over the state was told yesterday.!
Everett Reimer, Survey Re-
search Center consultant, ex-
plained that workers' participa-
tion in decisions about their own
jobs increases productivity, ac-
cording to results of two experi-
ments carried out by the Center.
HE SPOKE at the final session
of the two-day Management
Clinic sponsored by the Interna-
tional City Managers' Association
and the University Institute of
Public Administration.
One of the experiments, car-
ried out in the central office of
a life-insurtnee company,
showed that high-production
groups had less close supervi-
sion, more democratic supervi-
sion, more democratic supervis-
ors, more group pride and more
sa tisfaction from their work.
But, Reimer warned, not all the
results may be generally appli-
cable.
The other experiment, among
Detroit Edison Co. employees,
iended to confirm the importance
Of worker-participation, he said.
A major difficulty in social-sci-
ence research is applying the re-
sults to the practical situation,
Reimer pointed out. Competent
technicians are ready to apply
physical sciences' research find-
ings to industry, but "we haven't
any social engineers," he said.
Opera Group
Calls for Help
General, Proioti on
Staff Jobs Available
Aspiring P. T. Barnums, Billy
Roses and Buck Dawsons are in-
vited by the Union Opera Com-
mittee to attend the organiza-
tional meeting of its promotions
staff at 3 p.m. tomorrow, in Rm.
3A of the Union.
Promotions head Bill Zerman
announced that positions are
available for persons interested in
all types of promotional work for
the forthcoming Union Opera pre-
senta-tion, "Froggy Bottom."
* * *
HE EXPLAINED that an ex-
tensive publicity campangn will
be undertaken, including the
media of the press and radio, and
special publicity work among stu-
dents and alumni.
Dave Leyshon, chairman of
the Union Opera Committee,
announced an organizational
meeting of the general opera
committee will be held at 4:30
p.m. 1MOnday in Rm. 3G of the
Union.
He requested that present mem-
bers as well as those interested in
joining the staff attend the ses-
sion.

3

THE NEW TREATMENT calls
for swabbing dry teeth with a so-.
lution of zinc chloride, followed
by potassium ferrocyanide and
silver nitrate. The hard, dried
coating is supposed to protect the
teeth from decay and lower cold
sensitivity for nearly a year.
"From the tests mentioned in
the article, Y have found no
proof of the duration," Dr. Os-
trander said. "Furthermore, the
treatment hinges on Dr. Gott-
lieb's theory of tooth decay,
which isn't widely accepted."
Dr. Gottlieb believes that de-
cay is restricted to fissures in the
outer enamel, which the new pre-
cipitate plugs up, and to tooth
dentine, whereas the most popular'
theory is that decay can occur
any place on the enamel.
Reoist ration
JWill Contiuwe
Registration for evening school
classes at Ann Arbor High School,
105 S. State, will continue today
and through next week, Arthur
Rezny, Principal of the Evening
School announced.
Fifty-four courses including
hobbies, academic subjects, busi-
ness, homemaking, arts and in-
dustry are being offered, in the
largest program in the school's
history.
A RECORD-breaking 500 per-
sons signed up at the official
registration Thursday night. Mr.
Rezny urges other interested per-
sons to register as soon as possi-
ble.
Fees for the 12 week semester
are three dollars for most
courses, except shop and lab-
oratory which are five dollars.
Hours for most classes will be 8
to 10 p.m. at Ann Arbor High
School.
New courses include dress de-
sign, advanced bookkeeping and
accounting, educational use of
films and other audio-visual aids,
social security laws.
Second semester courses in child
psychology, photography and se-
t mantics will continue from similar
first semester courses.
Three courses, home motion pic-
tures, creative music and land-
scaping and gardening have been
added since the catalogue was
published.
Further information may be
obtained by calling 2-1786.
Art Exhibit Here
"Work in Progress in Michi-
i gan," an exhibit of paintings,
sculpture and ceramics executed
by Michigan artists, will open
Sunday in the South Gallery of
the University Museum of Art.
The exhibition will feature the
works of four distinguished Michi-
gan artists, Sarakis Sarkisian,
Maija Grotell, Zubel Katchar-
doorian and Marshall Fredericks.

The name of heiress-actress
June Millarde (left), known also
as Toni Seven, has been linked
: .romantically with that of Sen-
ator Warren Magnuson (Dem.,
Wash., shown above) who has
~::. been listed "necessarily absent"
.. . from the first sessions of the
81st Congress. An air of mild
mystery developed Jan. 6 over
>y : 'the current whereabouts of the
43-year old senator after re-
ports were published that Miss
Millarde left New York late in
November to marry him.

GOING HOME?'

t
' -

Be Safe!!
Travel with

NEW VIEW FOR SCIENTISTS:

Radar Antenna Adorns Engineering Building

A Signal Corps radar antenna
was recently mounted on the roof
of the East Engineering Building,
where it commands a majestic
view of Ann Arbor.
The three ton set, used during
the war for anti-aircraft fire con-
trol, will now be used for labora-
tory instruction and research
work in the science of electronics,
according to Robert Hegler of the
electrical engineering department,
who is in charge of the project.
observe a practical application of
tle electrical principles so dili-
gently studied in the class room.
The radar equipment will also be
valuable for the education of Air
Force officer personnel attending
the University, Hegler pointed
out.

the pulse encounters an object,
such as an airplane, part of it is
reflected back.
After the object is located by
the lower of two frequencies, its
movements can be followed by the
higher frequency of the antenna.
Two trucks and a large trailer
were required to bring the massive

radar set to Ann Arbor. The major
parts of the equipment are being
installed in a laboratory directly
beneath the antenna.
Hegler hopefully predicted that
the installation of the set would
soon be completed and the an-
tenna placed in operation in the
early part of next semester.

TRAVELER'S CHECKS
Good Anywhere
ANN AuBo BANK
University Branch 330 S. State

THE SILVER

~~

KING

t* * * * * * * * * ' I -

*1

Illi

He
tenna
trical

explained that the an-
sends out a pulse of elec-
energy as it rotates. If

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLE TIN
(continued from Page 2)
Room, Michigan League. Every-
body welcome.
U. of M. Hot Record Society:
"The greatest recordings of Sid-
ney Bechet" will be presented in
the Michigan League Ballroom,
Sun., 8 p.m. Everyone is invited.
Graduate Outing Club will meet
at 2:15 p.m., Sun., Jan. 9, at the
northwest entrance to Rackham
Building for ice-skating and hik-
ing. Sign list, at Rackham Check-
room desk. All graduates well
come.
Society for General Semantics:
3 p.m., Sun., Jan. 9, International
Center.
First Herd of
BOSTON, Mass.-The first city
park in the United States was
Boston Common, which was set
aside in 1634 as common commu-
nity ground.
At first, it was principally used
as sheep pasture.
Not until the 1900's did city
planners see the full value of
parks as recreational sites.

-.to

6

4?

r

...

PAl

t

11

Have A
Tat the basket-
U hall game .
with TNT
Turtle-Neck Tee shirts, that is!
RANDALL'S have them
in a wide variety of colors.

11

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonai d A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Student Work-Rev. H. L. Piekerill
Assistant-Miss Jean Garee
Director of Music-Wayne Dunlap
Organist-J. B. Strickland
9:30 A.M.-Junior and Intermediate Church
School.
9:40 A.M.-Student Bible Study Class led by
Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
10:45 A.M.-PubliceWorship. "The Only Re-
ligious Difficulty."
6:00 P.M.-Congregational-Disciples Student
Guild at the Memorial Christian Church.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study Class. A study of
the teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Loucks, "God's Word of Power."
6:00 PF.M.-Guild Program. Debate: Re-
solved that we should have church union
now.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
12:15 P.M.-After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-Young People's Fellowship, Page
Hall.
5:30 P.M.-Canterbury Club Supper and
Program,Canterbury House. Mr. DeWitt
Baldwin, Program Director of S.R.A., will
speak on "Summer Service Projects."
8:00 P.M.-Epiphany Festival of Lights.
Music by the Schola Cantorum. Sermon
by the ilev. G. Alexander Miller, Rector of
St. John's Church, Plymouth.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M. - Holy Communion
(followed by Student Breakfast, Canter-
bury House).
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.-Open House, Can-
terbury House.
MEMORiAL. CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation.
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.-Student bible class at the church.
10:50 A.M.-Morning Worship. Nursery for
children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students.
' Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild. New Year's Ded-
ication Service following the 6:00 supper
in the Memorial Christian Church.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH

Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.-"Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00 A.M.-Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.- Worship Service. "God Likes
Poor People." 1
6:15 P.M.--Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.-Worship Service. "The Mission-
ary Who Was Promised Failure."

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Church School.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Press, "A Test of Christian Living."
5:30-7:00 P.M. - Student Guild. Supper.
Rev. Press will lead a discussion of the
fourth chapter of the book "Alternative to
Futility," by Elton Trueblood.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

r

FLING

aside those
books for the
hockey game.

t

.

,A-

L.

I.

Stationery

DANCE TONIGHT
MASONIC TEMPLE
BALLROOM
STAG OR DRAG
ADMISSION 75c, TAX INCL.

.l4

/ /

kA~k
_ .7 7 r; ' 'ti:,t
"t:
'ir ,tf~ irti:. ~:"yi:{
cr{ {"3J{,if>{?rj; .. i;ji~4

I1

1.

r,

11

DILLON'S have new skirts
and sweaters just right
for warmth and style.
Whe
Uninn
l Ldance
remember EIBLER'S for
a necklace and bracelet
to complement that new dress.
VINT I Qbring
itMIT 1r U.f1*4

Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
" sermon topic: "Let's Try Religion."
5:30 P.M.-Wesleyan Guild will hear Dr.
James Brett Kenna speak on "Looking
Forward." Supper and fellowship.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Adult Group. Mr. Ray Eastman,
Ann Arbor Planning Commission, on "City
Planning."
11:00 A.M.-Sermon by Rev. Edward H. Red-
man, "Which World Religion?"--an ap-
praisal of the Amsterdam Conference Re-
port.
6:30 P.M.-Unitarian Students. Discussioh
of the Far Eastern Crisis. Snack Supper.
Social.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Westminster Guild Bible Semi-
nar. Coffee and rolls at 9:00 A.M.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon by
Dr. Lemon-"The Open Road-1949."
4:00 P.M.-Reception for all new members
given by officers of the Church, in the
Lewis-Vance Parlors.
5:30 P.M.---Westminster Guild supper fol-
lowed at 6:30 by meeting. "Christian Stu-
dents Look Ahead" topic discussed by Don
Flowers, Bob Rasmussen, Joanne. Smith,
Leonard Whittlinger, Al Wildman, Jean
Ervin, Bill Roberts, Linnea Jylha and
Gwen Peterson.

. _

W

I

S-D STOKER COAL
It's New . . . It's Different
REPEAT ORDERS PROVE IT

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor

Values Up to $2.50

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL

I

,

I

I

I

1f

I

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan