100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

p Ac1 st.

,THE MICHIGAN DAXILY

FRIDAY,. JANUARY _. 1949

_ _ _

VISA.LESS VISIT:
Egyptian Students Steal
Across Mexican Border

aBy JOHN NEUFELD
To Ibrahim Elabd, Spec., Mex-
ico looked just about like his na-
tive Egypt, but he had a hard
time finding that out.
Anxious to go along on the In-
ternational Center's Christmas
tour to Mexico City, he and two
other Egyptian studentsdset all
sorts of diplomatic machinery in
motion two weeks before the trip
started, but they never got visas.
* * *
IT SEEMS THAT Mexico made

a treaty in 1917 about the issue
of visas to visitors. North Amer=
icans don't need visas, and cit=
izens of countries participating in
the 1917 treaty can get their pass=
port stamped ht a consulate.
But citizens of other lands
must secure express permission
from' the Mexican Department
of the Interior before the con-
sul is allowed to issue a visa.
Elabd and his friends called
the Egyptian embassy, the Amer-
ican cultural attache in Mexico,
and other agencies, but failed to
get approval in time.
Undaunted, they left for the
border by auto.
ELABD says Mexican border
guards tried to turn him back at
Laredo, but that the driver just'
kept on going until they were
safely south of the border.
Elabd found many striking
similiarities between Egypt and
Mexico--architecture, food, cli-
mate and social conditions.
ON THE WAY back, the four-
car caravan had no trouble. To,
re-enter the United States it was
simply necessary to show student
identification cards.
ANOTHER UNIVERSITY mem-
ber who made the trip was Dr.
Balbina Serrano, who is working
for a master's degree in public
health.
But unlike the 17 others who
went along on the tour she didI
not have six days for seeing thel
city. Mexico City is her home, and
family visits kept her pretty busy.
Speech Expert.
Will Talk Here
Dr. Martin F. Palmer, recog-
nized authority on the correction
of speech disorders and a Univer-
sity graduate, will speak at 4
p.m. Wednesday at Rackham lec-
ture hall.
Speaking under the auspices of
the speech department, he will
discuss "Speech as a Science."
Dr. Palmer is founder-director
of the Institute of Logopedies,
Wichita, Kas.

Courtesy The Ann Arbor News.
NEW LUTHERAN CHAPEL-Built of brick with stone trim, the new $250,000 University Lutheran
Chapel is of modified Gothic des yn. With buik ing underway at 1523 Washtenaw Avenue, the
structure will house the chapel, student center facilities and a seven room apartment for the pastor.
Walter Maul of Maul and Lentz is the architect.

Cons truct ion Underway
On New Lutheran Chapel
By JANET WATTS
With the ground level construction completed, building is under-
way on the new $250,000 chapel for University student and faculty
members of the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod.
Actual building began in November on the chapel being erected
at 1523 Washtenaw Avenue.

to
students
on party
weekends
For Fast
Time-Saving Service
Head for the
DRIVE IN
BEER VAULT
303 N. Fifth Ave..

t4 *L

"I

WALTER MAUL of Maul and Lentz, of Detroit, is the architect.
The DeKoning Construction Company is handling the general con-
tract.
Of modified Gothic design, the structure will include a
chapel, a student center housing Gamma Delta, Lutheranstudent
club and a seven-room apartment for the pastor.
The chapel will have a seating capacity of 211, an increase of
about 100 over the present facilities.
** * *
IT IS ESTIMATED that the structure will be completed in about
15 months, according to Rev. Alfred Scheips, chapel pastor.
Providing funds for the new chapel is a project of the Michi-
gan District of the- Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod.
The local group plans to raise $25,000 of the. fund.
t4 4, * *
"THERE HAS LONG been a need for such a student chapel," said
Mr. Scheips.
NEVEU TO PLAY:
French Violinist To Present
Concert Tonmorrow at Hill.

Io

COLLISION
SERVICE
GENERAL REPAIRING
"Any Make of Car"
KNOLL and ERWIN
"Hudson Dealers"

Ginette Neveu, brilliant young
French violinist, will play for the
first time before local audiences
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Au-
ditorium.
A chance to preview her per-
formance here came Sunday when
Miss Neveu played her Strati-
varius with the New York Phil-
harmonic Sunday over CBS.
MISS NEVEU aroused excite-;
ment among critics and widel
public interest in the course of a
short introductory tour in this
country last season.
When the 27-year-old Paris-
ian played the Rrahms Con-
certo under her compatriot
Charles Muench, critic VirgilI
Thomson in the New York Her-
ald Tribune called her, "the fin-
est, from every point of view,

of the younger
ists."

European art-

Administration
Begis Drive
On Labor Act
Bill Would Reinstate
Revised Wagner Act
WASHINGTON-('P)-The ad-
ministration drive to get rid of the
Taft-Hartley Law picked up a
little steam in Congress as Sena-
tor Elbert Thomas (Dem., Utah)
introduced a bill to repeal it and
restore the Wagner Act.
Thomas is chairman of the Sen-
ate Labor Committee and will
lead the fight in the Senate to
carry out President Truman's la-
bor program.
Offering the repeal bill is just
the start of that fight. It is ex-
pected to last. weeks, maybe
months.
IN HIS state of the union mes-
sage, Mr. Truman called for re-
peal, reinstatement of the old
Wagner Act and "certain im-
provements" in the latter meas-
ure.
The changes Mr. Truman
wants are the same he sought
twvo years ago. Then, and again
,yesterday, h~e asked for a ban on
jurisdictional strikes and some
secondary boycotts; prevention
of economic force in disputes
over interpretation of existing
contracts; prevention of strikes
in vital industries where the
public interest is affected; and
a stronger labor eparment.
Thomas also introduced a bill
to boost the present minimum
wage of 40 cents an hour to 75
cents. Mr. ruman asked for
that, too.
Thomas told the Senate his
bill provides for repea "of the
Taft-Hartley features of the Na-
tional Labor Relations Act." He
was talking about the Wagner
Act, which was the basic labor
law before it was amended and
enlarged in 1947 and became the
Taft-Hartley law.
THE UTAH senator went on to
say that repeal, as he would han-
dle it, would restore the Wagner
Act as it was before the Taft-
Hartley changes.
"The repeal of the features of
the 1947 (Taft-Hartley) law will
call for other legislation and the
President's message called for
other legislation," Thomas said.
"At the same time these other
proposals may be worked out as
amendments or additions to the
National Labor Relations Act as
it stood before the 1947 law."
Thomas previously had indicat-
ed that he favored the "two pack-
age" approach urged by organ-
ized labor. That calls for repeal,
reinstatement of the Wagner Act,
and then-later and maybe-
modification of the original Wag-
ner Act to include the President's
proposals..

Iowa State
Pay Expert
To Lecture
The seventh and eighth eco-
noinics lectures of the current se-
ries will be given by Prof. Kenneth
E. Bouldingf of Iowa State College
Monday and Tuesday in the
Rackhan Building.
Prof. Boulding's first address,
"Economic Behavior," will be de-
livered before the Economics
Club at 7:45 p.m. Monday in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
THE ECONOMIST will discuss
"Foundations of Wage Policy" at
4:15 p.m. Tuesday in Rackham
lecture hall.
Prof. Boulding is fourth in a
series of guest economists who
will speak from University plat-
forms under the auspices of the
mon onics department this year.
Both lectures will be open to
the public.
PROF. BOULDING, a graduate
of both Oxford University and the
University of Chicago, is consid-
ered an expert on wage policy. He
has taught at numerous colleges,
and at one time served on the
League of Nations economic staff.
He is already familiar to Uni-
versity students through several
of his textbooks which are used
here.
Exercise Care
Prof. Warnts
City Managers
City managers were likened to
the caboose of a freight train by
Prof. Howard Y. McClusky in an
address before a meeting of a
;ity Management Clinic here yes-
ierday.
Prof. McClusky told 30 city
managers that their duty was to
merely initiate policy and then
to hold on like a caboose while
citizen's groups took over.
J: :k
THE CITY MANAGER type of
government is apt to be a rather
piecemeal affair, said McClusky.
Citizens' committees are
prone to concentrate on specific
need without bothering with a
long-run view, he said.
Today's morning session, to be'
held from 10 a.m. till noon in
lie Rackhamn Amphitheatre, will
>e concerned with various aspects
f public relations.

By 1950 the largest and fastest
freighter on the Great Lakes will
be ready for active duty, and the
engineering school will have
played an important role in its
creation.
The staff of the naval architec-
ture and marine engineering de-
partment assisted the owners in
determining the most efficient de-
sign characteristics of their pro-
posed new bulk cargo ship, the
"Sykes."
THE HULL FORM and pro-
peller design were based on results!
of long-time research carried out
on lake-type ships in the Unfver-
sity naval tank.
The most unique feature of
State Drug Co.
State and, Packard
ICE CREAM - LUNCHES
DRUGS

I

,4
.x ~ .

That's a fitting epithet for
these Shrink Resist Sweater
Sox fashioned of 44% wool
and 56% cotton. The turned-

down ribbed
nial favorite.
White only,

cuff is a peren-
Sizes 912 tol11.

Three Pairs... $1.99
or
79c per pair

306 South State

Engine School Helps Design
New Great Lakes Freighter

I

Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. I. Requisitions Accepted
0. D.MORHILL
314 South State St."

-------

at your feet

the vessel lies in its great in-
crease in cargo capacity.
The new dimensions of this
ship represent a considerable
change over the measurements of
existing ships.
The "SYK IE5," revolutionary
dream of naval architects and de-
signers, is now being built at the
Lorain yard of the American Ship
Building Company.
TYPEWRITERS

r

'1I

I

Beginning her musical

career;

907 N. Main St.

Phone 2-3275

*R_
Read.. Use Daily Classified Ads

I.

I,

at an early age, Miss Neveu
studied at the Paris Conservatory
and privately under Carl Flesch.
Tickets for tomorrow's concerti
may be purchased at the Univer-
sity Musical Society's offices,,i
Burton Tower, or immediately be-
fore the concert at the Hill box
office.
Theatre -Clinic
Will Give Plays,
Approximately 500 high school
students and teachers will attend
a High School Theatre Clinic at
the University of Michigan tomor-
row.
Three one-act plays will be pre-
sented during the morning by
University students in play pro-
duction.
DURING THE afternoon ses-
sion, University faculty 'members
of the Department of Speech will
direct discussion of vari'ous thea-
tre techniques. Prof. G. E. Dens-
more, chairman of the depart-
ment, will open the Clinic Satur-
day morning.
The plays shown will be "The
Lovely Miracle," by Paul John-
son; "Man of Destiny," by
George Bernard Shaw; and
"Love and Hew to Cure, It," by.
Thornton Wilder.

r . ----
r

I

Swift's Drug Store
340 SOUTH STATE STREET
for

Prescriptions

Drug Sundries

TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
3.OO

Student Supplies

Stationery

Magazines

[ LIGHT LUNCHES SERVED

I

I

ii

Il f I

I I I

ll

i

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan