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September 26, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBERb 26, 1949

THElM ICIIHAI AL

I ~-, I I

Graduate Students Receive
Eight Research Fellowships
Eight graduate students at the University have been awarded $1,000
fellowships for research in metropolitan community problems to be
carried out at Flint, under the leadership of Joseph Douglas Carroll,
Jr., Resident Director of the University of Michigan Social Science Re-
search Project at Flint.
* * *
THE FELLOWSHIP holders are Elden Brigham, Jack Jordan,
Reuben Sternfeld, Noland Heiden, Stuart Eurman, Arthur Hinman.
William Winter, and Thomas Dinell.
Together with Carroll they will continue the two-year study
of the social, economic, and political problems facing a typical
urban community.
Some of the research studies which have already been completed
include studies on Flint's trade and service area, urban decentraliza-
tion, "fringe area" problems, and library facilities in Genesee County.
* * *
The research will sesume on Oct. 1, and Carroll and his assistants
will live in Flint during the studies.

Whose a Democrat?
MONTGOMERY, Ala.-()-
Alabama, which has~ supported
every Democratic candidate
since 1872, may be the only
state this year where the voters
can't mark their ballots for
President Truman.
The question hasn't been
been settled yet in Louisiana
and Georgia, but every other
southern state has a place on
the November ticket for Tru-
man or electors pledged to him.
The President's name was
dropped from the ballot in
Louisiana, and Gov. J. Strom
Thurmond of South Carolina
and Fielding Wright of Missis-
sippi were designated the offi,
cial candidates
Gov. Earl K. Long called the
legislature into special session,
however, to get Truman back
in the running.
Georgia's Gov. M. E. Thomp-
son also today called a special
session of straighten out the
election tangle in that state.

_ .

" Cho
" Hui
" Laa

11 rb
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..qt*y..:.

It's High Time
To invest Wisely
ZIP-LINING
COATS
.545 to $7995

INTRODUCING JOHN DOE:
Sample Name Ma
BAD AXE, Mich. - (P)-One 4
evening a young man scanning his
evening newspaper came across
the name "Ignatius Szysulz ,
bruski." <3j
"Good name," he mused, "lucky
fellow. Might like it for myself."
He leaned back and wondered C
what life would be like to have a p
name that was really different, a
name totally unlike Smith or
Jones or, for instance, his own:w
* * * "
JOHN DOE'S simple name has
complicated his life and produced
an endless series of frustrating
and usually futile arguments with
mailmen, telephone *operators,
bank clerks, army officers and
chance, acquaintances.
Yet it is of his own choosing.
'He was born John William Doe 30
years ago and since has frequently
spurned suggestions that he call
himself "J. William."
"It's a good name," he has said,
"even if it is a bit confusing
Everyone believes that I come=
from a town called 'Bad Axe,' but
no one will believe a simple name
like John Doe."*
LIFE with such a name has fre-
quently been inter esting. There
was the time in the Army, for
instance, when the first sergeant
asked recruit Doe his name.
"John Doe," he replied. some recruits how t]
The sergeant grew pale, mut- dents should addres
tered "wise guy" and put De on diers. When he use
KP. as a sample name,
Later, fearful that a spy was in sighed and preparec
their midst, Army Intelligence of- Within a week
ficers questioned Roe. The Bad known but literal-
Axe soldier sothed their worries spondents, followin
by producing his birth certificate, exactly, sent him p
a document he long since had ten endearing lett
grown used to carrying. The offi- lowed him all over t
cer studied it and shook his head overseas, wherer
in bewilderment. months. Some still
* * * * *
"BUT," HE complained, "we just PEACE HAS bro
don't have any John Does in the aches, too. Doe is
Army." being laughed at b
The experience was typical. and eyed with suspi
Once a company commander told men. He once requi
letter from the D
which had hired h
Name Winner cash his pay check.
Now he has a jo
Of Gut Prize
Carinelius J. Lammers has been
awarded the $500 Camille Gutt
Scholarship for the current year,
Frank E. Robbins, assistant to HILL
the president announced.
Camille Gutt, chairman of the Auditori
International Monetary Fund's
executive board, returned to the
University the $500 honorarium
given him for lectures in the sum-
mer session.
This sum is being used for this
scholarship, which was estab-
lished for this year only.
Lammers, who came here from
the University of Amsterdam, is
studying political science. He will
return to the Netherlands at the
end of the year.

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:4 'ti '

Come E and See
Our Wide Selection
of
BLOUSES
For School - For Dates
Plaids and Plain Colors
Soft Pastels
Long or Short Sleeves
95 and up
Sizes 32-38

les Life Difficult

Fifty outstanding pictures from
the campuses of American colleges
and universities are now on dis-
play in the Union.
The exhibit, which will continue
through Oct. 1, is made up of
representative pictures selected
from hundreds which have been
taken during the last seven years
for the Chicago Tribune weekly
rotogravure feature "Youth on
the Campus."
A number of pictures taken on
the university campus are includ-
ed in the display.

K

SINCE THE TRIBUNE began
publishing its weekly- rotogravure
report of student life on American
campuses on Oct. 6, 1940, Andre
Pavlin, the photographer, and
Eleanor Nangle, who gathers and
writes the data about each campus
have visited more than 175 col-
leges and universities from coast
to coast.
Pictures from Northwestern
university opened the series, after
which the University of Wiscon-
sin and the University of Iowa
were featured.

JOHN DOE AND SON
. . man with the "sample name"

heir correspon- salesman for

'Youth on the Campus' Pictures
Are Now on Display in Union

a service station

1u've discovered already .. .
the first thing you'll need in Ann
or . . . is a warm winter coat.
ad one of these versatile gabardine,
d tweed or camel hair coats .. .
zip-lined with wool, chamois or .
her. .- will see you through
il, Winter and Spring in comfort.
hese in green, grey, black,
beige or mixed tweeds for
sizes 9-15 and 10-20.
ANN ARBOR
Main at Liberty

s letters to sol-
ed "John Doe"
the real Doe
d for the worst.
scores of un-
minded corre-
ig instructions
rompt and of-
ers. They fol-
he nation, and
he spent 18
arrive.
*
ught its head-
accustomed to
y bank clerks
cion by police-
uired a special
Detroit factory
im in order to
b as a driver-

chain with headquarters in Bad
Axe. In this capacity he finds it
necessary to make frequent long
distance calls to the home office,
collect. Of course, each call is pre-
ceded by a long, baffling argument
with th elong distance operator.
THE YOUNG man from Bad Axe
fails to feel sorry for himself,
however.
"Not many people have as much
fun with a name as I've had," he
said. "Smith may be more com-
mon, but mine's more exciting."
As a gesture of how he feels, he
and his wife, Roberta, named their
son John Thomas Doe. Little John
Doe is only five now.
"Maybe he'll call himself J,
Thomas," said his father.

SMARTEST HOSIERY S OPPE
Michigan Theatre Building
for that first football game .. .
WOOL BABUSHKAS
...and ...
rPURE SILKSCARFS
in solid colors
and colorful prints
.. Always Reasonably Priced
11 NICKELS ARCADE

_ . . _

University of Michigan Oratorical Association

um

LECTU RE

COURS

1948
1949

r .___. _ ___ ___
- i

4/loorite

1.
EVERY SMART COED knows the value of a skirt and
blouse combination. Youthful and neat appearing yet
comfortable are the factors that make this combination
an all-time favorite for campus and classroom. 0 To
meet your demand we have a large and varied selection
of skirts and blouses.
BLOUSES..*
Tailored or dressy in either cotton or crepe.
Sizes 32-38. ............$3.95 to $8.95
SKIRTS...
Full or back interests in 100% wool, rayon
gabardine, wool gabardine and flannel.
All Sizes ..............$5.95 to $10.95

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t( 1.i
va ,,
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/t z

Raymond Gram Swing John Mason Brown
Seven Outstanding Numbers
Oct. 12 ROBERT MAGIDOFF
The radio correspondent whose dramatic expulsion from
Russia last April helped seal the Iron Curtain, brings an
uncensored report on the conditions in and the objectives
of contemporary Russia. His daily broadcasts from Moscow
during the tense days of the war were heard by millions
of Americarls.
"WHY I WAS EXPELLED FROM THE SOVIET UNION"
Nov. 1 RAYMOND GRAM SWING
The famous broadcaster whose incisive analyses of wartime
events won him a greater audience than that of any other
non-political personality, will appraise the clashes and crises
of today. He is the first commentator to have won the
two "Oscars" of broadcasting, the Dupont and Peabody
awards.
"HISTORY ON THE MARCH"
Nov. 10 REBECCA WEST
The brilliant British author of the widely acclaimed "The
Meaning of Treason" will enlarge upon the theme of that
book in her lecture. Having covered the Nurenberg and
British treason trials and the lynching trial last June at
Greenville, S.C., she is well qualified to speak on this inter-
esting and vital subject.
"FAMOUS TRIALS"

Robert Magidoff

Herbert Agar

Nov. 19 JOHN MASON BROWN
Associate Editor of The "Saturday Review of Literature, is
returning by popular request for the third successive season
to present his kaleidoscopic and witty commentary on
current literature and the Broadway theatre. The audience
is assured a stimulating and entertaining evening.
"BROADWAY IN REVIEW"
Feb. 24 CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER
The distinguished actress, will return to Hill Auditorium for
her third appearance. On this occasion she will present
her colorful multi-part drama "The Wives of Henry VIII."
Originally presented in London and then having a long
run in New York, this solo drama will offer unusual and
delightful entertainment.
"THE WIVES OF HENRY VIII"
Mar. 3 EVE CURIE
One of the world's best known women and author of the
biography of her famous mother, Miss Curie is now the co-
publisher of, the second largest newspaper in France. She
will discuss the vital problems that confront her native
country and that influence the peace of the world.
"FRANCE-STRUGGLE FOR CIVILIZATION"
Mar. 10 HERBERT AGAR
Former special assistant to Ambassadors John G., Winant
and W. Averell Harriman and former chief of the United
States Information Service in London, Mr. Agar speaks with
eloquence and understanding on conditions in England. His
book, "The People's Choice," won the 1933 Pulitzer Prize
in American history.
"ENGLAND TODAY"
Cornelia Otis Skinner Eve Curie

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