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January 04, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



MAICHIGAN

TUESDAY. 7ANIUNRT 4. 191

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7OLULEGE ROUNDUP:
Wildcats Go Wild Over
New Years' Day Victory
By CRAIG WILSON
The Wildcats of Northwestern trounced the Golden Bears of Cali-
ornia 20-14, on New Years' Day, climaxing more than five weeks of
frenzied joy on both campuses.
THE DAILY Northwestern announced the glorious news of being
chosen to "go west" with headlines as deep as the palm of your hand:
"ROSES!" Being tabloid, that was all they could squeeze in.
"Conservative Northwestern yesterday literally stood on its
head in a 24-hour celebration," they said in words immortal.
Happy administrators smiled official approval of picketing of the
next day's classes only to have President Franklyn B. Snyder and foot-
ball captain Alex Sarkisian jointly announce that classes would be
discontinued for a week-.
AT BERKELEY, the celebration was a poignant affair without
benefit of happy administrators with reprieves but filled with unhospi-
table San Francisco gendarmes.
Police were originally unimpressed by a few hundred Cal
rooters who convened in Frisco with the aid of a band, according
to the Daily Caifornian. Three-hundred strong, they marched up
Market St. Wastecans "generously donated" by S.F. were set on
fire. Bouquets of roses were "borrowed" from a park,
"Onward to the Golden Gate," someone yelled. However, the root-
ers took the long way--through the lobbies and footlights of two thea-
tres. With ranks noticeably dwindling, yell leaders were not able to
keep order when the paraders approached a 'Frisco burlesque house:
The mob careened down the aisles but "neither gams nor girlies
met their gaze," according to the Daily Californian.
A TYPICAL HAYS office seal-of-approval movie was being shown,
and by the time the rooters returned to the sidewalk, San Francisco
Police had arrived at the scene.
They captured one lone Bear rooter and one Daily Californian
reporter.
Meanwhile, at, UCLA, one dejected lad commented:
"I know how the Bruins can get into the Rose Bowl. Steal the
Key.~
.4 * A' 4
IF CAL ROOTERS could not celebrate a Bowl victory, they could
at least take pride in their student newspaper, the Daily Californian,
which went to a beauty parlor over the vacation and come back with
a new line of typography.
The name across page one now reads:
"The Daily Californian-Monarch of the College Dailies."
(According to Webster, a "Monarch" is a large butterfly having
orange-brown wings with black veins and borders, whose larva feeds on
milkweed.)
THE CALIFORNIAN claims its first beginnings are buried ten years
deep in the nineteenth century and she has had the pleasure of report-
ing such startling events as :
"Cal University grounds to get electric lights . .."
"Professor purchases phonograph..."
The City Beat

Williams Plans
State Agney
Confe rences

RENEWING THE TIE:
University To Compile
Foreign Alumni List

State
Party

DemoCrati c
Split Seen

RAMPAGING RIVER-Destruction left by floods in the northeast
extended over a six-state area, caused by swollen streams like this
one, the Pequannock River. C. Ii. Johanning is being rescued from
his flood-surrounded home by canoist Les Bircher, near Mountain
View, N.J.
DECISION POSTPONED:
Regents Still Consider
Political Speakers Ban

LANSING-(/P)-The first offi-;
cial act of Governor Williams was
to lay the groundwork for ac-
quainting himself with the work-
ings of all state agencies.
WHILE HE IS preparing his
message for the Republican Leg-
islature session Thursday, he
asked all departments and com-
missions to prepare proposed
agendas for conferences with him.
Meanwhile, the new gover-
nor's promise of bi-partisan
state government was headed
into its first stet this week as
legislators began to arrive for
the opening session Wednesday.
In his inaugural message, Wil-
liams said the people had indi-
cated they did not wish to place
full control in the hands of any
one party.
Meanwhile it seemed that a
?'In.or solit in the Democratic
party might develop with Grand
Rapids playing host to two sep-
arate Democratic State Conven-
tions this spring.
A portion of the Democratic
State Central Committee met Sat-
urday and set Feb. 5 for a conven-
tion in the furniture city.
State Chairman John R.
Franco, who refused to call offi-
cially for the Saturday meeting
said today he would call a Com-
mittee meeting for Jan. 31 when
another date would be set for the
spring convention-probably also
in Grand Rapids.

The University's 5,000 foreign
alumni will soo re-establish con-
tact with their alma mater in a
move by the University to bring
old addresses up to date and to
find out what mark its graduates
have made upon the world.
INTERNATIONAL Center, the
Phoenix Project and the Alumni
'ugar Child'
To Play Here.
Ann Arborites will have a
chance to see the 10-year-old
boogie-woogie prodigy whose ar-
tistry startled the nation, when
Sugar Chil Robinson makes his
first local appearance at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the Ann Arbor Civic
Club.
SiJGA,, CHILD, who gave his
arst concert three years ago, was
pounding out chords before his
legs were long enough to reach the
piano peddles.
A native of Detroit, Sugar
Child was tinkering with piano
keys before he was able to talk.
Given lessons by his encour-
iging parents, he blossomed into
. skilled pianist when he was five
rears old, still barely able to reach
he ends of the keyboard.
Playing both boogie-woogie and
zebop for his local fans, Sugar
Thild will be joined by Carlotta
Franzel, former soloist in the mu-
sical comedy "Carmen Jones."

Catalog Office are cooperating in
an effort to refurbish the anti-
quated catalog system.
Letters will soon be circulated
all over the world explaining the
object of the campaign and in-
cluding a questionnaire to be
returned to the University. The
questionnaire includes occupa-
tion, address, and current bi-
ography.-
The Alumni Catalog Office
would appreciate any information
concerning present addresses of
foreign alumni, according toRob-
ert Klinger, assistant to the Di-
rector of International Center.
* '*
KLINGER explained that there
are many ambassadors, industrial-
ists and prominent people among
the foreign alumni which the
University has lost all contact
with.

Slosson Says
Williams May
Ask for FEPC
Michigan's new governor, G.
Mennen Williams, is very likely to
call for the enactment of a fair
employment practices law as one
of the key points of his legislative
program.
THIS PREDICTION was made
by Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department. A recent an-
nouncement disclosed that Prof.
Slosson is a member of the gov-
ernor's Advisory Committee on
Civil Rights.
The committee, which in-
cludes prominent religious, in-
dustrial labor, and educational
leaders, was set up mainly to
advise the governor in the prep-
aration '+of is inaugural ad-
dress, and to consider problems
dealing with fair employment
practices, according to Prof.
Slosson.
-

! I

i 77- --

i

While students celebrated
Christmas at home and temporary
escape, Ann Arbor experienced a
highly political vacation period as
local politicians, including many
faculty members, worked furious-
ly to get ready for the Feb. 21
prinary for^ the April elections.
Both Republicans and Demo-
crats nominated a complete slate
for city and county offices. Mean-
while the aftermath of Nov. 2 be-
came effective as four new county
and two new city officials were
installed.
In one of his last cases before
taking over the probate judgeship,
Municipal Judge Jay H. Payne
ruled the city's controversial anti-
sound-truck ordinance unconsti-
tutional.
Two Progressive Party members
John Huston, '51L, and Max Dean,
'49L, had been arraigned for vio-
lating the law; Judge Payne up-

held their claim that it denied
freedom of speech and said the
whole ordinance was probably in
violation of the First and Four-
teeenth Amendments.
City Attorney William M. Laird
said the decision would not be ap-
pealed and a new ordinance had
been drawn to meet Judge Payne's
ruling.
Mayor William E. Brown's
Christmas present to Washtenaw
County youths was the news that
pre-induction draft calls here will
be "very, very large" during the
next few months.
"We'll be trying to build up a
big backlog of leigible youths for
future calls," he explained.
Flames fanned by a strong wind,
swept a North Division St. ware-
house in a $40,000 fire early Dec.
30. The fire was visible 15 miles
away and brought several hundred
spectators to the scene.

The controversial political
speakers ban is still under con-
sideration by the Board of Re-
gents.
The Regents took no action on
student and faculty recommenda-
tions regarding the ban whichi
were presented at their last meet-
ing, Dec. 17 and 18.
THE BOARD took the plaits
under advisenent and will an- 1
nounce their decision at their'
next meeting.
TheeStudent Legislature pro-
posal was sent to the Regents
Latin-American
Author To Lecture,
Gil Blas Tejeira, prominent
newspaperman, educator andc
writer from Panama will make a
stop-over at the University to-
morrow on a three-month tour of
American universities, newspapcrsI
and broadcasting stations.'
The Panamanian's visit hasj
been arranged under a travel-
grant program of the Department
of State according to Robert
Klinger, assistant to the Direclor
of International Center.
Until recently, Tejeira was vi('O-
president of the National Asscnm-
bly of Panama. He is ectitor and
publisher of a weekly Colon news-
paper, Calle 6. Tejcira wil be a'
guest of the International C.nt T'
during his visit.
Iii aiiaedate Bums
MUTTONVILLE, Mich. A;
America pulled itseli up out a
cepre,,sion in the late this , ,
average citizens conbBId '1
spend an average of $9 illio"
year for per'sonal care, (lr' in I'',
and accessoris, shoes,j ywe'ry,
and lkggag and for ci dug,
storage and repair of clothinl-.

after they refused to hear rep-
resentatives of the Committee
to Abolish the Ban last fall and
requested that SL study the
situation.
The Faculty Senate submitted
its own recommendations to the
Regents.
Neither plan was made public,
but informed sources revealed
that both the SL and the faculty
senate had asked for the lifting
of the ban on political speakers.
ColgeTrends
To Be Discussed
George E. Carrothers, Director
of the University Bureau of Co-
oper'ation with Educational Insti-
tutions, will speak on "Purposes,
Organization and Trends in Junior'
EColleges" at 7 p.m. today in Rm.
110 of the Library.
T he lecture is one of a series
on problems in higher education,
and is open 'to graduate students
and other interested persons.
a~ ~
Cenrre.E rate on
igrs red n sig
Extra earnings on Bonus
Swvings Accounts

COLLISION
SERVICE
GENERAL REPAIRING
"Any Make of Car"
KNOLL and ERWIN

Shirts beautifully laundered
22c each
(except silk or fancy)
Kyer Model Lau dry
1215 South University 814 South State
627 South Main

Be Prepared
for that big
date!
Send your shirts to our
modern plant for High-
°est Quality work.

"Hudson Dealers"

E

907 N. Main St.

Phone 2-3275

l

---

C4-; 4'4P C4 Pep%

.

LIFTS D AVE FROM
toV E'S NADIR TO
CORYBANTIC ECSTASY

4F

LUCKY MEI ABOUT TO BEHOLD THE
KALEIDOSCOPIC UNDULATIONS OF GRETA
GAYHEART- AND
\ +ESCORTING THE
MOST
-GLAMOROUS GAL
CN THE CAMPUS
ROMANCE CERTAINLY
f.' JY SEEMS TO BE ON THE
HORIZON, MY GAY LOTHARIO

~

I

F

DAVE, YOU'VE GOT CIGARETTE
HANGOVER. WHY NOT
CHANGE TO PHILIP MORRIS,
THE ONLY LEADING CIGARETTE
PROVED DEFINITELY LE$5
IRRITATING'?

N -°
(1

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549
Assets Over $12,000,000

.,
ti%
"
._ .h .

.. . . . .. . _ .

Gct Your Pens Ready for
EXAMS

$KIP THE MOA, DON PLEASE
JUAN, AND GO HOME PRINCESS
ANDU DO SOMETH I NG.HRUMPH-HRUMPV
AUOUT THAT BARKING PArDONT ME-
FOGET fTHANK:;OHNNOT TO
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THANK YOU SOMUCH 5
SROMEO, I NEVER
ENJOYED A MORE >
* DELIGHTFUL
EVENING
't C~YFOIG INSVNHHAE 1U, GORGEOUS. BUT DONT LE'S
FOGrTO THANK JOHNNY

~%M

I

BE THRIFTY

I

SUBSCRIBE

A'
1

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY
NADIR - As low as you can get;
directly under foot.
CORYBANTIC - Wild with excitement,
KALEIDOSCOPIC - Many-colored;
technicolor, in fact.
UNDULATIONS - What panther women
and serpents do, looping around
gracefully,
LOTHARIO - The greatest "maker of
time" before Bulova.
ODALISQUE - An Oriental charmer.
FULMINATING -_ Exploding, thundering,
CIGARETTE HANGOVER - That stale,
smoked-out taste; that tihht, dry feeling
in your throat due to smoking,
IRIDESCENT -Changing colors under light.
AURIOLA - Golden halo,
EUPHONIOUS - Pleasant-sounding,

TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
X3,99

n'
/1

O4~'ory Po a Rea/Moiw/
Our campus story has a definite purpose: to make you realize
the genuine DIFFERENCE that PHILIP MORRIS possesses. We
have full proof of that, but too extensive to be scientifically
dCt-iled here. We cordially invite interested students engaged
in chemistry and pre-medical work, to write our Research

THE

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