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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1948 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



-

Lightweight Football Now
Strong, Growing infant

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By MERLE LEVIN
Don't look now but the blue-
faced baby of Western Confer-
ence athletics has turned into a
lusty brat squalling fair new field;
to conquer.
Lightweight football which first
~aw the light of a Big Nine clay
on a cool October morning in
1947 took its first halting steps
forward this season and bean to
feel its muscle.
THEY DIDN'T think much of
the kid's chances for survival last
year. They thought it was too un-
coordinated. It was pretty strong
around Wisconsin and Michigan
but it was a little unsteady
around Illinois and Ohio State.
There wasn't mach space for
the little guy to play in either,
they needed cavorting room for
his big brothers. The kid
wouldn't earn his keep, they
said.
The kid didn't say much-he
couldn't-but ' he kept on plug-
ging away. A few close relatives
took a little interest in what was
going on and came down to see
the kid play. They liked what
they saw and came back for
more - more important they
brought some of their friends
along to take a look at what they
were sure was a child prodigy.
IT GOT SO that over a thous-
and people turned out at Ann Ar-
bor one cold day this fall. Dubi-
ous relatives who liked the feel
of money in their pockets weren't
quite as outspoken against the
new arrival. Finally from Evans-
ton* and Lafayette and Bloom-
ington came words of encourage-
ment.
It seemed the folks down
there would like to see the kid
after all-IF they could find
room for him to play. Condi-
The kid was growing stronger
all the time. The weak spots

around Illinois and Ohio State
were gaining strength especially'
so in Illinois.
FROM COLUMBUS came word
that a long as they w{rted to
keep the little guy around Ann
Arbor they would warit him in
Ohio too. That old natural rival-
ry was springing up over the kid.
Christmas is right around
the corner now and as is al-
ways the case at this time of
year thoughts have turned in
other directions among mem-
bers of the Western Conference
family.
But the kid doesn't care. He's
gotten some attention he has
been seeking for a long time. It's
a pretty nice Christmas present
even if it isn't too concrete yet.
The little tyke will be resting
his 150 pounds for a few months
now. But he'll be doing a lot of
hoping. He's coming right along.

WIELDS BIG STICK:
Renfrew Classed with
Greatest 'M' Pucksters

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Kappa Sigma,
Zeta Psi Win
In Water Polo

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By BOB SANDELL
Al Renfrew, captain of the Wol-
verine hockey squad, is beginning
the final phase of a college puck
career that is nearly unparalleled
in the history of the ice game at
Michigan.
Al, who came to Ann Arbor in
the fall of '45, has been one of
the mainstays of Vic Heyliger's
highly successful puck teams of
the past three ,seasons.
* * *
IN THESE THREE campaigns
phis rangy, sharpshooting wing-
man has amassed a grand total

Trainri Hut erform's
tradles' for Gridders

By MARSHALL SAHLINS
Down in the training room of;
Yost Field House, amid the smell
of medicants and back rub, works
a man who is parforming miracles
with a little tape, a few comfort-
ing words, and a lot of know how.
Of course, anyone familiar with
Michigan athletics will recognize
this man as Jim Hunt, trainer of
"the champions of the West."
IN MEDICAL CIRCLES Jim is
known as a physio-therapist, one
who practices physical medicine
(massages, exercises etc.) but
among the fans, the coaelies ad
the players ie is known as "BA.

Women's Night
Tuesday 'til
9:00 P.M.
For the-cheeriest C/istmas on re
f ~
" ;

I.C.", best trainer in the country,
and with good, reason.
For instance, Jim was one of
the biggest factors in maintain-
ing Michigan's undefeated foot-
ball record. In fact, since hie
came to Michigan in the fall of
1947, the Big Nine grid champ-
ions have not dropped a single
game.
Much of this can be attributed
to the aid Jim has given the ball-
players, not only physically, but
mentally as well. e
FOR WITH THE dexterity
that heels aching muscles and
tapes wrenched knees and ankles,
Jim combines a few well chosen
words of wisdom and a quiet
manner that gives the players
confidence in themselves and re-
lieves any fears or inhibitions they
may have over their injuries.
Obviously, such a state of
mind is of tremendous help in
enabling a player to perform at
his best.
* *
MICHIGAN OWES a great deal
to Jim Hunt, but perhaps the fin-
est tribute that can be paid to him
is in the words of Head Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan.
He said, "Jim is even more than
the best trainer in the country. To
me he is another coach on my
staff. All things considered, he
was as important as any single
man in putting our taem in the
position it holds today."

of 125 points, a sum which is sur-
passed only by his record smash-
ing teammate, Gordy McMillan.
Even with this tremendous
scoring record, Al also has the
reputation of being a brilliant
defensive and all-around team
player. He does an excellent job
of picking up his wing during an
opponent's rush, a measure
which greatly aids thle Wolver-
ine defensemen in throttling the
attack.
You can't blame the captain of
the NCAA hockey champions for
not being superstitious, for iron-
ically enough it was Friday the
thireenth of last February that
he had his biggest night as a
Maize and Blue puckman.
* * *
THE GAME of that night with
the ever dangerous Gophers from
Minnesota stands out particularly
in Al's mind, not only because of
his- outstanding performan e, but
as a result of their 6-2 Victory,
the Wolverines cinched an invita-
tion to the National tournament
at Colorado Springs.
Playing inspired hockey, Al
netted two goals unassisted in
the initial stanza, and then with
the able assistance of Wally
Gacek, he proceeded to add two
more tallies in the second frame.
Al narrowly missed a fifth
counter, but it didn't matter
since McMillan slammed in the
rebound shot.
This four goal outburst will be
long remembered by Al and his
teammates for the important role
it played in the team's drive for
the national crown.
* * *
AL IS EXTREMELY popular
with the rest of the Wolverine
pucksters as was evidenced by his
selection as captain. He possesses
a keen competitive spirit and is
a team man in every respect.
Al contends that competition
with top notch performers all his
life has helped his play a great
deal. During his high school days
in Toronto, he had the chance
to practice with Ted Lindsay,
present star of the Detroit Red
Wings.
Significantly, Michigan has al-
ways managed to whip the Goph-
ers for the mythical Big Nine title
while Al has been in the Blue
lineup, a feat nearly impossible
years ago.

Four teams will be splashing
through the semi-finals in water
polo this week.
THE KAPPA SIGS remained in
the competition with a 1-0 win
over Alpha Sigma Phi, while Zeta
Psi swam over the Lambda Chis;
2-0.
The competition for these two
teams depends on the outcomes
of the game between Phi Gamma
Delta and Sigma Phi Epsilon and
the Delta Upsilon-Phi Kappa Psi
contest.
THE DU'S, champions for the
past three years, were slow to get

GET TIIE POINT?-Ed Mielief, (left) mainstay of the Scimitar Club. demonstrates with an epee
duelling sword the best method of preventing Norm Barnett's (right) attack to the foot by employ-
ing a stop thrust. Pete Young (second from the left) and Frank Toby, who is standing next
to him are two additional reasons why this sport should be given varsity recognition. The records
prove that their brand of fencing would be a ci edit to the school.
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underway but have been coming
to the front rapidly. Their last
conquest was a 2-0 victory over
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Phi Kappa
Psi and the Zeta Psis stand in
their way to a fourth straight
championship.
The water polo playoffs are of
the round-robin type with the
championship worth 75 points in
the fraternity title race.

.,

I'm going to the
VAN BUBEN SHOP'

give

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^ <(

By CAL KLYMAN
When the time comes that the
Michigan Athletic department
has to be coaxed to accept a po-
tential championship team, your
Daily reporter will pack his bags
and take the nearest rocket ship
to Mars, for all would be lost on
Earth.
We are about to give out with
last goodbyes for there is a group
of fencing enthusiasts on campus
who would make this hyperbole a
reality.
*k * *
DUELLING UNDER the name
of the Scimitar Club, these ath-
letes have slashed to quite a rep-
utation in and out of this area.
Only two weeks ago, an un-
derdog, grossly underrated
Scimitar Club met the best fen-
cers of the state for the "Three
Weapon Championship." Once
again the pollsters were shock-
ed as Scimitar not only upset
the favorite, Salle de Tuscan,
but soundly beat the reigning
champs.
At this point the question aris-
es of why this group isn't fight-
ing under the Michigan banner,
contributing to the legend of 'M'
champions and adding another
trophy or two to the pile.
* * *
THE SOLUTION to this prob-
lem lies with the Athletic De-
partment which hasn't as yet re-
granted varsity recognition to the
sport.
We say "regranted" because
fencing was recognized at the
University in the "Roaring
Twenties" and early thirties.
For some undisclosed reason,
recognition disappeared with
the depression.
After analyzing the situation,
can there be any reasons why
recognition should be withheld?
If the case depends on the ability
of Michigan to put out a team
that would uphold the winning
tradition that that varsity has
established, there can be no bar-
rier to recognition.
THE SCIMITAR CLUB, which
would be the nucleus of any var-
sity team has proven worthy of
carrying the standards of Michi-
gan to even greater heights.
Ed Miellef, sparkplug, play-
er coach, has won enough me-
dals in competitions to start
his own gold market. Pete
Young, another mainstay of
the team, has met and beaten
the best fencers in the state
and country.
In the "Three Weapon Compe-
tition," Young vanquished Byron
Kreager of Salle de Tuscan who
is considered by the experts as
the best fencer in the state and
is ranked among the first ten in
the country.
* * *
IN COMPARISON to other
sports, the cost of outfitting a
fencing team is negligible. To
completely equip a squad, weap-
ons, uniforms and all, would take
less than $300 from the athletic
coffers.
If there is doubt as to the in-
terest in the sport, one need
only look at the freshmen, 50
in number, who elected fencing
to fulfill the physical phase of
their education.

varsity sport. Most of the East-
ern schools can boast a fencing
squad which should provide a
wide field of opponents for a
Michigan team. ,
It seems to this reporter that
the Athletic Department, in car-
rying out its commendable
"Sports for all" program has im-
plied the sentiment that when-
ever a large enough group ex-
presses its desire to participate in
an unrecognized sport, that sport
is given that recognition.
The desire has been expressed,
the rest is up to the Department.
Turks .Pace
International
Volleyball Play
Action continued in the Inter-
national volleyball league last
week with the Turks still dominat-
ing play at the Intramural Build-
ing gymnasium.
Although the Turkish team had
their consecutive win streak
snapped at six, they managed to
whip the previously unbeaten
Chinese Club to cling to first place.
They sport a 10-2 record while the
Chinese dropped to second with
a 8-4 mark.
The Philippines moved into
contention as they downed the
Europeans in six straight games.
The loss sank the defeated team
to last place with a record of 12
straight setbacks.

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