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December 14, 1948 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- : ..(y '
13948

THE SI#MCHGAAIlY ___ __

PERENNIAL POLITICIAN:

Walsh Wins Seven Straight

By JOHN DAVIES
Tom Walsh seems to keep
inning campus elections with the
regularity of the tides.
Besides winning elections-his
recent wins returning him to the
Student Legislature and Board in
Control of Student Publications
are his sixth and seventh in suc-
eession-Walsh has taken active
part in so many organizations
that a list of them reads like a
roster of University political ac-
ivities.
AS IF CAMPUS politics weren't
enough, Tom Walsh ran for coun-
ty clerk as a Democrat this fall
and lost in traditionally Republi-
can Washtenaw county. He also
was publicity manager for Preston
Slosson's congressional campaign.
The first-year law student,
who plans a career in politics,
is an independent who has never'
lived in a residence hall.
He was married last Easter
and was in the Army for three
years, most of the time in the
Southwest Pacific. He worked
on the business and circulation
staff of "Yank" traveling from
Australia to Japan.
Meetings for Walsh average at
least one a day, occasionally to-
taling three or more. Add to this
at least five hours alone with the
books and it can be seen his day
doesn't end with the sunset.
* * *
WALSH attributes his many
elections in spite of being inde-
pendent and not living in a resi-
dence hall to three things. He is
active in many serious groups, he
is never afrii to voice an onin-
Ion on a subject, many of which
'iave met WMIL approvai anu Lie
spends a lot of time just talking
to,people.
Entering the University as a
second-semester freshman-
transfer from Wayne University
in the spring of 1946, Tom
Walsh ran that semester for a
seat on the newly-formed Stu-
dent Legislature. He lost, com-
ing in 26 in a field, of 63 from
which the top 18 were seated.

';' * __C^ ____

TOM WALSH
... the winner

seats which then started
40 yard line.

at theI

* * *
WALSH'S EDITORIAL raised
the broader question of why stu-
dents weren't issued better seats
in the first place. The result was
a committee of student leaders, in-
cluding Walsh, who met with fac-
ulty, M Club members and Coach
Crisler.
It won the present system of
issuing tickets to football games
based on number of semesters
at the University and got stu-
dents seats starting at the 50-
yard line.
That fall Walsh headed the All-
Campus Slate for the Student
Legislature election which did well
and got him elected along with
eight others. He has been a mem-
ber ever since.
SPEAKING O Walsh, Student
Legislature President Blair Moody
says "He has something to add in
discussion of all important issues."
Walsh has a reputation of know-
ing more about parliamentary
procedure than anyone else in the
SL.
Walsh has a long record of

a committee of five which met
with five faculty members of the
University Senate to discuss the
ban. The result has been SL and
Faculty agreement in principle on
a proposed change in the Univer-
sity rogulations being submitted
to the Regents this week.
.' * *
WALSH CITES the recently in-
augurated faculty grading system
as another example of positive
student-faculty cooperation. This
was originated by the SL two
years ago.
"Sometimes the student gov-
ernment is a bit too cautious,"
Walsh says. But he points with
pride to action it has taken, for
example the referendum vote on
the MYDA resouution.
President Ruthven had banned
MYDA from the campus without
an explanation or a hearing and
the SL passed a resolution against
the President's action.
* *' *
A SIX-HOUR REFEIREND)UM
vote on the issue was held and
5500 voted in the election which
sustained the SL action.
Tom Walsh would like to see
some changes made in election
procedures, but favors the Hare
system of proportional voting.
"I think people should be
elected by what they think and
by what their potential capabil-
ities are," Walsh says. He fa-
vors a system of open houses
scheduled by the SL held at dif-
ferent dormitories and public
buildings, likecthe League, at
which all the candidates would
be present. This would acquaint
students with the candidates.
Walsh initiated a campus-wide
rally two years ago to further this
end. He also thinks a more ex-
tensive questionaire than the one
printed in the Daily this fall
would also be advisable.
"Lack of student interest is
what killed the former student
governments," Walsh says, and he
thinks the reason only a third of
the campus voted this semester
was that they didn't know any-
thing about the candidates that
were running.
Somehow or other, Walsh has
found time to be a member of
Americans for Democratic Action.
United World Federalists, and th
right wing of the American Vet-,
erans Committee, and the Casc
Club in the Law School.

Offer Men
Suggestions
For Her Gift
It shouldn't happen to a dog
-but every year about this time,
it happens to almost every man
on campus-the problem of what
to buy her for Christmas.
Men have, or so one hears, been
trying to figure out women for
centuries. But come Christmas-
tide, for some reason her tastes
and preferences become a sudden
mystery.
THERE ARE certain things
which always please a woman.
Although flowers and candy are
nice, they are not a lasting gift
-so at Christmas, they are to
be avoided unless one is at a
complete loss.
In the first place, records are
always welcome. Scarves of all
types are another important
addition to Milady's posses-
sions. Simply observing her
color-schemes will usually lead
to the proper choice of color.
She may wear them at the
neck of her suits or sweaters,
tucked in or out of her coat, ba-
bushkas, with her formal attire
or matched with mittens.
NOTICE WHETHER or not
she has matched mitten-and-
scarf sets, or whether she has a
white scarf to wear with her
formals. -
Men are inclined to prefer
subtle perfume, so a word to
the wise is sufficient. But try
to carry out her preferences in
buying.
An initialed lighter and cig-
arette case, or perhaps a match-
ed compact and cigarette case,
would be nice for the Miss of
the Moment who smokes.
IF SHE LIKES certain poets
or authors a quick call to her
room-mate will settle the ques-
tion of whether or not she has
their latest writings. In case she
doesn't, there is another good
gift possibility.
Most women like jewelry;
but again, it's purely a matter
of observation. And of course,
there's hardly a women alive
who doesn't appreciate a pho-
tograph from Him.
So observation is the key when
buying her Christmas gift. And
if by any chance she's just said
"Yes," there should be no prob-
lem when Dec. 25 arrives.

CC NEDS
RUNNING

SANTA CLAUS AND FRIENDS-These happy lads and lassies
are shown talking things over with Santa at last year's annual
IFC school children's Christmas party. This year's party will
be held Thursday at Hill Auditorium. Several clowns will liven
things up.
Santa Claus Fmll A ppear at
Children's IFC Xmas Part

Woody Herman's orchestra and
an Esquire motif drew enough
students to the A-Hop to net
$465.45 for the Fresh Air Camp,
according to AIM, Men President'
James Kallman.
Sponsored jointly by the AIM
and Assembly Association, the
dance was termed "a financial
success" by Kallman. It was held
October 16 in the IM Building.
* * *
THE CONTRIBUTION will
probably be used to winterize the

CSetcLe

'7
JI

camp by getting heating for the
lodge, Kallman said.
Fixing up the Camp for use as
a student recreation center has
been the project of many campus
organizations. It is a favorite spot
for spring and fall picnics and
dances.
* .: e
PLANS FOR EXPANSION and
improvement of the Fresh Air
Camp are coordinated by a stu-
dent committee composed of dele-
gates from campus organizations.

FINANCIAL SUCCESS
'U' Fresh Air Camp Benefits
From Profits of '48 A-Hop

4'o

ii ,

Santa Claus will make a her-
sonal appearance for the annual
IFC school children's Christmas
Party to be held at 3:30 p.m.
Thursday in Hill Auditorium.
All children are invited to the
party at which there will be a-

grand scale array of entertain-
ment besides Santa. A Christmas
poem will be presented by Play
Production students, for one
thing, and they'll be more clowns
to make things gay than you can
shake a stick at.

/j

1

..-...... .

Check Over This List -

LI
[]
0i
Li
(L
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li

Bath Towel Sets
Tea Towels
Bath Mat Set
Table Cloths
Blankets
Colored Sheet Sets
Handkerchiefs
Embroidered
Pillow Cases
Cocktail Napkins
Tea Napkins
Silk Scarfs
Place Mat Sets
Throw Rugs
Guest Towels
Shower and Window
Curtain Sets

pS
STOP IN when you're going
through the Arcade and let
us help you do your Christ-
mas shopping.

BILLFOLDS
COMPACTS
SCARVES
BLOUSES
HOSIERY BAGS
CASHMERE.
and ANGORA
SWEATERS
Open
till Nine
Tonight

Walk
straight
to
Mademoiselle
to
find
all
your
Christmas
gifts

GLOVES
GOWNS
LACY PANTIES
IMPORTED
PERFUMES
and COLOGNES
MEN'S
TOILETRIES
FOR
WOMEN ONLY
Free gift wrapping

The next semester, Walsh at- introducing measures in the
tracted attention by his editorials Student Legislature and has
in The Daily. One blasted the held ar number of offices within
triple cut on the Friday after the SL.
Thanksgiving out of existence. He feels the purpose of the Stu-
Another was influential in dent Legislature is to mirror stu-
getting the present seating system dent opinion and points as an
in football games. The SL was example to the SL resolution
then concerned with freshmen who against the speakers' ban. He
were fraudulently getting senior pointed out that the SL appointed

.

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The GAGJE LINEN SHOP
I 11 Nic KITls At<CAJDl
A lwa~ys RIasabVl)y Price'd

302 South State

Phone 4727

q~l

.M.

The Christmas gifts to draw oh's and oh's from the
most fastidious woman on your list. Every item
in our stock selected with the utmost care
to stretch your Christmas dollars.

tti
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* Boucle Sweaters
Cap sleeve boucle knit rayon
sweaters in untrimmed or
adorned with pearl and metallic
medallions. Eggshell, pink,
aqua, maize or grey. Sizes 34-40
$.00 to $14.95

* Wool Stoles and
Scarfs.
Jersey or plaid wool stoles,
squares and neck scarfs
in pastels or high sliatles.
Warm and lovely.
$?.09 to $409

* Giftable Bracelets
thlinestone, gold, or silver limk.
gold" or silver chain nd bea
bracelets to match necklaces
and earrings.
$1,00( tO $14.95
rC..C .
.4}..

* Earrings
i2nc toine, gold, pearl. dilver
or semi-precious stones in every
color of the rainbow in all styles,
$1.09 to $8.95
* Necklaces
Pearls, rhinestones, gold or
silver long chains and chokers
so necessary to complete her
costLIme. $1.00 to $14.95
* Scatter Pins
Ti mny rhinestone, pearl, and
colored pins to wear In clusters
wi coat, suit, dross or blouse.
$1.00 pr. to $5.00 pr,
* Pure Silk Scarfs
Squares and neck scarfs .

II
ao-
~ip
that make his h
I&
+ r bat T"-" fas"ter1 .-1 R

Xs

AMi

S

ti

a
40,

e

toe

.1 rt

t

, -.

* Leather or Fabric
Gloves
Black, brown, white, or colored
gloves in doeskin, cotton fabric,
wool, kidskin, or pigskin
in her size.
$7.00 to $8.95

* Gay Umbrellas
Collapsible tuck-away styles as

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