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December 14, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

AR .. s ICV . . a ..A. . . t Da. ALY

TUESDAY' . DECEMBER 14. 194th

THe.. MTC HJiiaifT AN vTLI AA, A

.L, TI "' .ThAVI f li r SVM1 !p AllA1.-10

THOSE WERE THE DAYS:
Fabulous Editor Fought
For Revolutionized Daily

By FREDIRICA WINTERS
Back in the days when Angell
Hall wasn't even a gleam in the
administration's eye, one Otto H.
Hans descended upon Ann Arbor,
left his name in the annals of
:Michigan's "fabulous," by revolu-
tionizing The Michigan Daily.
Hans entered the University in
1894 with $100 and the philosophy
that "any young man who has the
grit and determination can send
himself through college and never
be obliged to call upon his parents
for financial help."
'U' Reigious
faciities Rate
High in Nation
Literary College Lists
20 Religion Courses
Present University facilities for
religious education compare favor-
ably with those of other tax sup-
ported universities, a report on
religion in state universities re-
veals.
Edward Blakeman, former re-
ligious research consultant, in an
article appearing ina recent copy
of "Religious Education" shows
the literary college catalogue lists
20 courses connected with religion.
Only the University of Colorado
with 24 offers more such courses.
HOWEVER, RELIGION falls to
secondary academic status in
schools where ecclesiastical as-
pects have been omitted. Religion
and Bible courses are never re-
quired of students and large sums
are not usually appropriated for
religious courses in tax supported
schools, Blakeman points out.
The literary college executive
committtee is now considering
a faculty report on religious
training in the University. The
plan would increase the num-
ber of courses in established de-
partments.
Franklin Littell, Lane Hall di-
rector, has suggested that a sep-
arate department of religion be
established at the University.
BLAKEMAN'S report showed
that five state universities have
special departments. Four uni-
versities including Michigan have
a degree program in religion with
courses split among the various
departments,.
Schools without special depart-
ments emphasize cultural aspects
of religion rather than theolog-
ical, the reports shows.r

THE $100 went for tuition and
books, and the philosophy got him
a place to live in exchange for
doing odd jobs.
Times during his freshman
year when he wasn't stoking the
furnace or waiting on table at
fraternity houses, Hans was
treasurer of his class and light-
weightvwrestling champion of
the University. '
Hans became a reformer in his
sophomore year, and exposed the
nefarious" business methods of
The Daily board. Grateful stu-
dents rose en masse and elected
Hans business manager of the
paper.
BY THE TIME he was a junior
at the University, Hans' Daily po-
sition was lucrative enough so
that"he gave up his careeras a
waiter and janitor.
Clever maneuvering and a
collection of proxy votes kept
Hans on The Daily right
through law school, alternating
as business manager and man-
aging editor. The Daily consti-
tution was changed, so that
Hans could hold his job as long
as he wanted.
"The Terrible Dutchman," as
Hans came to be known, horrified
University faculty and theolog-
ians by originating a Sunday
Daily in 1900. The first college
paper in the country to publish on
Sunday, The Sunday Daily con-
tained timely cartoons and cover-
age of Saturday's sports events.
THE INTREPID publisher-man-
ager was hauled up on the Uni-
versity carpet many times for
journalistic misdemeanors of one
sort or other, but refused to allow
official censorship of copy.
Because of this, a rival fac-
tion, with University blessing,
started the "Varsity News." In a
typical Hansian move, "the
Dutchman" contrived a merger
of The Daily and the News with
himself as business manager.
After this coup, the University
apparently gave up, and the re-
mainder of Hans' college career
was relatively peaceful.
However, Hans wasn't all prac-
tical businessman. Known as a
"'college Bohemian,'' he wrote love
ballads, started a "top fad" that
had professors and students alike
spinning away, and invented the
manually operated forerunner of
the modern football scoreboard.
Keniston To Speak
Dean Hayward Keniston, of the
Literary College, will speak at 7
p.m. tonight in Rm. 110 of the
General Library on the "College
Teacher as a Citizen."

New Band
Organized
ByROTC
To Be Used .for
Military Parades
The University has its own un-
beatable Marching Band, but a
new baby will soon be stepping
into the musical spotlight.
It's the recently organized mil-
itary band, sponsored by the RO
TC department, and managed en-j
tirely by the student participants.
Although only one rehearsal has
been held to date, weekly prac-
tices scheduled for next year will
whip the aggregation into note-
worthy shape before the end of
April, the organizers predict.
* * *
HEADED BY director Constan-
tin LaFkiotes, freshman ROTC
student, the band was formulated
to provide a suitable musical back-
drop for future military drills,
parades and ceremonies of all
kinds.
After a successful roundup of
recruits, the organization is now
composed of forty pieces and
boasts of many experienced
players formerly with name
dance bands. Also included in
the ranks are members of the
"Varsity Marching Band.
First and second year military
students comprise the main body
of the staff. After having com-
pleted a certain amount of ROTC
drill for classes, they will be able
to devote more time to regular
band practice, according to Cap-
tain D. H. Merten, band super-
visor.

The new civil engineering op-
tion, the Bureau of Reclamation,
and the war-time activities of the
metal processing department are
just a few of the topics discussed
in the new Technic.
The December issue of this en-
gineering publication will go on
sale tomorrow at the West En-
gineering Arch.
* * *
ROGER KUEHL, in his article,
"The Construction Option in Civil
Engineering," shows how this ad-
dition to the curriculum supple-
ments the theoretical knowledge
of the civil engineer with training
in cost analysis, construction
methods, business management
and labor relations.
The importance of the Bureau
of Reclamation, the best dam
engineering organization in the
world, is described, by Leroy
Weinstein.
During the war the University's
metal processing department was
called upon by the War Produc-
tion Board to furnish the neces-
sary information for promoting

ON SALE TOMORROW:
Variety of Engineering Topics
Featured in Latest 'Technic'

increased production and operat-
ing efficiency of manufacturers.
* * *
THE ARTICLE describing this
project is the second in the series,
"Research at the University of
Michigan."
Also included in this month's
issue is another professional en-
gineering examination, since the
previous ones have been in such
demand.
DP Program
To BeAired
"Official Statistics," a docu-
mentary on displaced persons in
Europe will be featured on this
week's Workshop Drama at 7:45
p.m. today over station WHRV.
The show, written by Ray Na-
deau, Grad., will beunder the
direction of William Stegath,
Grad. Included in the cast are
Bob White, '49, Vic Hurwitz, '49,
Robert Carter, '50, Dick Jennings,
'50, Jim Kearney, '49, Jacqueline
Gabourie, '49, and Roger Shepard,
'49.

T

SURVIVORS.AWAIT RESCUE-Seven of 33 survivors on an Air Force C-54 forced down in the
niid-Pacific sit in a life raft awaiting their rescue by the USS Rendova. Faces of some of the
'men are smeared with an anti-sunburn solution. Left to right: M-Sgt. Elmer W. Martin of Wil-
liamsport, Md.; S-Sgt. Lloyd E. Card of New York, N.Y.; M-Sgt. Willard A. Weiss of Spokane,
Washington; S-Sgt. Robert G. Johnson of Billings, Mont.; CWO Russen R. MacFarland of Bridge-
port, Conn.; M-Sgt. Leslie C. Tripp of Fairhaven, Mass.; and S-Sgt. Walter E. Schumann of Jersey
City, N.J.

Garg Carlls for Contributions,
Sets Pre-Vacation Deadline

Even as the Christmas Gargoyle
went on sale yesterday work was
underway on the February issue
of the campus magazine, sched-
uled to appear early in March.
A call went out for literary con-
tributions to meet the before-va-
cation deadline. Somewhat more
serious than the lighthearted
'Ensign Plans
Dorm Photos
All students living in a resi-
dence hall have the opportunity
for the first time of having their
picture in the Michiganensian if
their house votes for it.
A new residence hall section,
similar to the fraternity and sor-
ority section in past Michiganen-
sians, will be run in the new year-
book according to 'Ensian Sales
Manager Bill Zerman.
THE NEW SECTION will be
headed by an appropriate division
page and there will be two pic-
tures on each page, 75 students in
each.
Houses in East ana West Quad-
rangles are currently being con-
tacted by Zerman to see if they
will be represented. Women's resi-
dence halls will be contacted at a
later date.

Christmas issue, the February
Gargoyle will include short stories,
poetry and sketches among its lit-
erary features.
Contributions may be deposited
before 5 p.m. Friday in the Gar-
goyle office, 103 Publications
Bldg., and should include the writ-
er's name and address.
Literary contributions to the
Gargoyle are copyright by the
Board in Control, but remain the
property of the writer. Publication
in the Gargoyle does not affect
eligibility for Hopwood Awards.
No specific theme has been set
for the literary section of the
Gargoyle. As to a theme for the
humorous portions of the maga-
zine, Brian Duff, humor editor,
declined to comment.
"I may have something up my
sleeve, however," he said, inspect-
ing his tee shirt.
Civic Theatre Calls'
For Play Tryouts
Persons interested in participat-
ing in the Ann Arbor Civic The-
atre's production of "All My Sons"
may try out at 8 p.m., Wednesday
in the log cabin in Burns Park.
The play is under the direction
of Bill Bromfield and Betty Fuller.
Further information may be
had by calling Mrs. Todd Jones,
2-4122.

BusAd Counil
To Hold Party
The Business Administration
Student Council has entered into
the Christmas spirit by planning
an all-school party to be held
from 3-5 p.m. today in the Stu-
dent Lounge of the school.
The six-foot Christmas tree,
complete with ornaments, in the
front hall of the school, was pro-
curred and decorated by the
Council as a further holiday note.

FOR ECONOMY

.r

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COLLISION
SERVICE
GENERAL REPAIRING
"Any Make of Car"
KNOLL and ERWIN

Try our
STUDENT BUNDLES
A semi-finished bundle especially
designed for students. This gives you
shirts, handkerchiefs, and wool socks
beautifully ironed; underwear and pa-
jamas fluff dried ready to wear. Call
418 5 for information.
Kyer Model Laundry

"Hudson Dealers"
907 N. Main St.

Phone 2-3275

627 South Main

Phone 4185

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A FORTUNE - Before Xmas

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THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY,
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located at the corner of Liberty St. and Fifth

TIME REGULAR RATES
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Ctris Itmas Shoppiug;
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'IOIIRILS Ilave a g~iIf
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S' lis Smith Corona and all
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Sheaffer, Parker, Estebrook
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Wallets always make a wel-
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wallets.
ELiCTRIC RAZORS 1 GAMES
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LIFE, TIME and

LIFE REGULAR RATES
First Subscription . . $6.00
Second Subscription . . $5.00
Third Subscription . . . $4.00
STUDENT RATE $4.75
ONE GIFT $6.00
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