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December 12, 1948 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THt .mMI ICAN ALLY

3'N7DA ', D IVIBER 12, ~1948

TH.. ,ANDIL ..Ii~~2,14

U.S., Russian
Students Will
Correspond
Plan Arranged with
Soviet Youth Agency
As Russian mailmen trudge
thru the Soviet snows this winter,
along with their regular load they
will be carrying letters f rom
American students.
The Correspondence Bureau of
NSA has suceeded in contacting a
Russian Youth Agency which will
supply the names of Soviet stu-
dents interested in corresponding
with Americans, according to Dor-
ianne Zipperstein, chairman of
the bureau.
"THIS EXCHANGE of letters is1
probably the only method avail-
able to students to keep the doors
to eastern Europe open," Miss
Zipperstein said.
"The Correspondence Bureau
offers an invaluable opportunity
for Michigan students to get a
first hand picture of life in
other countries," she added.
Many other countries are also
included in this program. Corres-
pondence arrangements have
been made through the Interna-
tional Union of Students enabling
Americans to write to people
of more than forty countries
throughout the world.
** *
WE HAVE already received
many letters from German stu-
dents, who are especially interest-
ed in this program, "Miss Zipper-
stein said.
"A German youth recently
explained that since Germany
has so long secluded herself
from the rest of the world, a
free exchange of views would be
very helpful to us," she de-
clared.
University students who intend
to go abroad will find this ex-
change of letters very helpful in
planning their trips, Miss Zipper-
stein explained.
_ Anyone wishing to write to for-
eign students may contact Miss
Zipperstein by calling 2-2591 or
sending a postcard to her at Helen
Newberry.

Rich Australian Grazing Land
Scorched by Great Drought

PROGRESS IN SINGAPORE:
Malay Women Slowly Gain Freedom

By RICHARD S. MARRIOTT
Brisbane-(P)-A great drought
is scorching some of Australia's
richest grazing country.
It has caused the biggest mass
migration of sheep and cattle in
this Dominion's history. At least
2,000,000 sheep and 500,000 cattle
have been moved to places where
they can find grass to eat and
water to drink.
THE PARCHED country is
nearly half of Queensland State's
670,000 square miles. In a tri-
angular area as large as Texas,
the cattle and sheep population
has been reduced about nine-
tenths.
The drought area stretches
from Longreach in the Central
west to Winton and beyond in the
North, and to within 100 miles of
the Pacific at Rockhampton.
In this area sheep men are driv-

ing up to 100 miles each week to
buy their meat supplies from
town butchers. They don't have
any sheep left on their properties
to kill. The butchers are carting
their meat hundreds of miles from
the lush coastal fringe.
EVEN the birds have deserted
this dry country.
No useful rain has fallen in the
area for two years, but the present
situation is the culmination of a
series of poor seasons before 1947.
Even artesian wells are cut-
ting out. This is because there
has not been sufficient rain in
many parts of Western Queens-
land.
Sheep and cattle losses, how-
ever, are not as great as in pre-
vious droughts of less severity.

By MARGARET BOWES
Singapore,-(IP)-Malay women
compelled for centuries to live
sheltered, self-effacing lives as
semi-slave wives, are moving to-
ward the freedom and independ-
ence enjoyed by their sisters in
other parts of the world.
On conservative Singapore Is-
land the symptons of the new way
have become increasingly evident
since the war. The career girl
concept is foreign to Malay cul-
ture, but it is being accepted grad-
ually.
SOME MODERN parents en-
courage their daughters to buck
tradition. More do so all the time.
No longer does a Malay girl at 14
marry the man of her parent's
choice. Now she waits a few years,
does her own choosing and mar-
ries for love.

Nor does she veil her face.
The Malay veil-scarf has be-
come a glamorous aid to co-
quetry rather than a dictate of
custom.
Malay women in Singapore ad-
mit that their Chinese sisters have
led the way for them.
"We have been backward," said
one girl, "but no more."
* * *
TYPICAL of the new Malay wo-
men is Miss Salma Binti Ismail,
first Malay girl ever to earn an
M.D. degree from Singapore's
King Edward VII College of Medi-
cine. Now she is practicing at
Alor Star General Hospital in up-
country Kedah State.
Miss Hasmah Binte Mohamed
Ali, 22, is a first year medical
student at the same college, the
lone Malay girl in a class of 87
men. "When I'm through," she

says, "I'm going to specialize,
probably in children."
Hasmah decided to become a
doctor during the Japanese occu-
pation, she says. "The people in
the Kampongs (Villages) had no
one to take care of them."
HASMAH'S family worried
about her Kuala Lumpur home,
but her mother encouraged both
her and her older sister, Saleha, to
study. Saleha now is in England
studying social science on a gov-
ernment scholarship.
At Raffles College the femi-
nine "revolt" has a staunch ally
in Mrs. P. C. Khew. She looks
after girl students in residence
at old Flagstaff House. Of her 30
girls only two are Malays. There
are only five in the whole col-
lege. But 10 years ago there
were none.

were none.
It-

CLASS IN MUSEUM-School children sketch armored knight at
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Civil Service Positions Open
To Upper Class U' Students
Sophomores and juniors who t -- ,..

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4

I -
* -m

v/ i

will have completed all required
courses by June 30, 1949, are eligi-
ble to take two student aid exami-
nations for positions in various
bureaus of the United States Civil
Service.
Students qualified in engineer-
ing, chemistry, mathematics, met-
allurgy, physics, meteorology and
geology are being accepted in the
Public Buildings Administration,
Bureau of Aeronautic, and Ships,
the Geological Survey, Federal
Power Commission, and the De-
partment of the Army and other
government agencies.
METEOROLOGIST positions
with the Weather Bureau are also
open.
Under the Student Aid plan,
successful candidates will fill
trainee positions with yearly
salaries ranging from $2,498 to
$2,724.

To qualify for these trainee po-
sitions, applicants must pass a
written test
APPOINTMENTS are usually
made for employement during va-
cation periods in which the stu-
dents gain on-the-job training,
after which they will be granted
leave to return to college.
Having completed four years
of appropriate study and the
training programs, they may
be promoted to full time posi-
tions without further written
tests.
Information and application
forms regarding these posts may
be obtained at the regional Civil
Service office or from the U. S.
Civil Service Commission, Wash-
ington 25, D. C. Application must
be on file not later than Feb. 1,
1949.

It's

MEN'S

F
7
,!"1
Ct
,y

.~Ny
/}
- #-
l Ti

ati
c
Right:
Leather Briefcases
from $9.00
Lef
Per
at'
Gifts
for that engineer
from Wahr's

WAHR'S

Left:

Right:
The ideal

Bookends from $5.00

1. ".

Christmas Gift,
Pen and Pencil Sets
from Wahr's
Right:
We also have
a nice selection of
Desk Sets,
$3.50 and up

00LO
00
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ob
6
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Ft:

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'r)Lqujre.,Inc.

What Every
"CHRISTMAS EVE"

v

sonalized Stationery
Wahr's

Right:
Every type of wallet
at Wahr's,
from $1.00 and up

A
R iy
, O
/

'SIh)oal kinowvi. 0

Men prefer gifts from men's shops.
There are few better shopping centers

for men

than Ann Arbor's State Street.
Be sure to shop at WAGNER'S...
This is their 100th Christmas season!
OPEN MONDAY AND TUESDAY NIGHTS
UNTIL 9 P.M.

Books, Subscriptions To Their Favori
Magazine, and Art Supplies,
Make the Perfect Christmas Gifts.

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