100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1948 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PG ou

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12. 1948

i

. _ _.. _v._ , ., _..
......
..

I

The
City Editor's
SCRATCH
PAD
I TOOK A WALK through the University's
plush new Administration building the
other day.
It's quite a place-elevators all over, shiny
ohrome, modernistic fixtures, panelled of-
fices, and big airy rooms. This is the new
home of the administration which runs the
University.
Then I thought about some of the other
buildings on the campus-the tiny clut-
tered dark offices of some of our renowned
scholars and professors, the students jam-
med into barracks in the quad ree-rooms
and inadequate rooming houses, still other
students commuting daily from Willow
Run, and finally the overcrowded class-
rooms.
This plush administration building
thoughtfully provides new quarters for the
Office of Student Affairs. But this office,
used by literally hundreds of students daily,
consists of a couple of totally inadequate
cubicles.
Upstairs, in striking contrast, the admin-
istrators all have offices which are big
enough to hold a dance in.
To me it symbolized one of the evils
existing at the University. It graphically
illustrated the absolute divorcement of
administration and education and the
consequent subordination of education to
administration.
Granted that this university and its 20,-
000 students has become big business. And
granted that plenty of vice-presidents and
clerks are needed to perform the numerous
housekeeping duties that go along with a
big business.
But it seems to me that the bureaucrats
forget that the main purpose of this "busi-
ness" is still education. They are so busy
going blithely ahead with their "policy" de-
cisions that they seem to have lost touch
with the people who are affected by this pol-
icy.
This minor example of office space is
transcended by the larger problems posed
by this barrier between administrators
and educators.
When, as they too often do, bureaucrats
determine some ridiculously unworkable
policy, the educators are the people who
have to work with it. Most of the time they
are not even consulted beforehand.
Possibly the educators must share some of
the blame 'for this situation because they
have failed to develop capable administra-
tors among themselves.
But that's no excuse for the bureau-
crats to continually ride roughshod over
them. It would be a good idea if the Ad-
ministration were to re-examine its posi-
tion.
After all what's the use of having fine
buildings and a fat appropriation from the
State Legislature if education has to take a
back seat in the process.
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
snd represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: LEON JAROFF

'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
Record Destruction

By SAMUEL GRAFTON
IN 1969 it was discovered that more than
3,000,000 persons were employed in the
United States merely to keep public records.
There were by then some 67,000,000 work-
ers under social security. There were also
52,000,000 veterans and their dependents
(for the veterans had been unusually pro-
lific) on whom tabs were being kept by the
V.A. More than 104,000,000 persons were in-
cluded in the compulsory health insurance
plan. And then there were, of course, the
farmers.
It was in that year that the revolution-
ary suggestion was made that all public
record-keeping be stopped, and that all
records be destroyed.
When the proposal was first advanced, it
was met with a shout of unbelief and dis-
may. But it was quickly pointed out that, by
that time, almost the entire population of
the country was included in one social bene-
fit system or another. Therefore one of the
prime purposes of record-keeping, that of
avoiding giving benefits to those not en-
titled to them, had disappeared.
It had also come about, over the years,
that benefits in all categories had become
approximately equal, i.e., one received about
the same degree of medical care as a veteran
or a non-veteran, as a farmer or as a retired
civil servant. The need for refined computa-
tions had thus virtually vanished.
And since almost everyone who turned
up for aid was sure to be included in some
grouping, it had become a useless task, of
interest only to record-keepers, to find out
just which group any particular applicant
claimed under. If he was not in one cate-
gory, he was certain to be in another, and
thus it was advocated that all applicants
for benefits should be listed under only
one heading, namely, "people."
Under the new plan, then, no documen-
tary evidence or paper of any sort were re-
quired in order to obtain an old age pension,'
or an operation, or unemployment compen-
sation. The mere fact that one was alive and
in need was considered proof of claim.

It was felt, of course, that there would be
some cheating. But statisticians quickly
showed that cheating would account for on-
ly 2.6 per cent of total amounts disbursed,
because most people were basically honest,
and that this item, when made up for by a
special cheating tax, came to an infinitesi-
mal burden on the economy, and one which
could be safely disregarded.
The only remaining objection was that
there were still several hundred thousand
persons who had never qualified under
any plan, and that these would now come
horning in. Two answers were made to
this, first that a very tiny federal bureau
could keep lists of those who were not en-
titled to any benefits at all, in comparison
with the agencies required to keep track
of those who were entitled to benefits,
and, second, that the few who did not
qualify under any plan were probably
such rugged individualists that they
would never ask for anything, anyway.
The savings under the new plan were
enormous. The world paper shortage was
ended at once, and, in addition a budget
item of several billions of dollars was elim-
inated. Since savings on record-keeping were
applied to welfare work, the quality of the
services improved, while total costs actually
went down.
But the most remarkable result was the
decline in bureaucracy. The tories had al-
ways used "the growth of a bureaucracy" as
their biggest argument against social ser-
vices. It was found, strangely enough, that
this was a danger only so long as social ser-
vices were inadequate. When these services
applied to only part of the population, bur-
eaucracy grew. But when they applied to the
entire country, the bureaucracy was no
longer needed, and so it disappeared.
Needless to say, the new plan was a huge
success, not least because it showed us how
to avoid having too complicated a civiliza-
tion, with too much government surveillance
and unnecessary poking into private affairs.
(Copyright, 1948, New York Post Corporation)

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION - -
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 17-28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise if the
time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. Evening,
4 o'clock, 5 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may use any of the
periods marked * provided there is no conflict. A final period
on January 28 is available in case no earlier period can be used.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place
of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, no date of examination may be changed without the
consent of the Examination Committee.

Letters to the Editor...

The Daily accords its readers the
privilege of submitting letters for
publication in this column. Subject
to space limitations, the general pol-
icy is to publish in the order in which
they are received all letters bearing
the writer's signature and address.
Letters exceeding 300 words, repeti-
tious letters and letters of a defama-
tory character or such letters which
for any other reason are not in good,
taste will not be published. The
editors reserve the privilege of con-
densing letters.
* * *
Sooty Problem
To the Editor:
W E OF THE WEST Quad have
a freedom of choice: We
may choose to keep our windows
closed and suffocate, or we 'may
open, them, just a little, and choke
on the soot. Surely, when there is
soot on the beds, on the rest of
the furniture, and all over our
clothes, it must also be deleterious
to our health!
We saw by the minutes of the
West Quad Council that this
problem has been investigated,
and it was found that it would
take $40,000 to install the addi-
tional equipment necessary to
keep Quadrangle chimneys from
spouting out soot. No action was
taken. by' the University. These
chimneys and incinerators are
used only for the disposal of
" a t

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8. .........................M on.,
9 ..........................W ed.,
10. . .. ......................F ri.,
11..........................M on.,
1 ......................Wed.,
2 ......................Tues.,
3 .........................Thurs.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17, 9-12
19, 9-12
21, 9-12
24, 9-12
26, 9-12
25, 2- 5
27, 2- 5
18, 9-12
20, 9-12
22, 9-12
25, 9-12
27, 9-12
26, 2- 5
24, 2- 5

8..........
9..........
10........
11........
1..........
2..........
3..........

. iTues.,
.. Thurs.,
.. Sat.,
Tues.,
. Thurs.,
..Wed.,
..Mon.,

Irregulars, make-up, etc. ................ .Fri.,
SPECIAL PERIODS
Political Science 1
Sociology 51, 54, 90*................Mon.
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ...................*Tues.,
English 1, 2
Psychology 31 .......................*Wed.,
Chemistry 1, 3
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101 ..........*Thurs.,
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 153; Speech 31, 32 ............. .Fri.,
Botany 1; Zoology 1..................*Sat.,

Jan. 28, 9-12
Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan. 18, 2- 5
Jan. 19, 2- 5
Jan. 20, 2- 5
Jan. 21, 2- 5
Jan. 22, 2- 5

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

waste paper, and similar combus-
tible materials. Would it not be
possible for the University to
back up a truck to take this pa-
per and other materials out to
the city dump, rather than con-
tinuing to shower us with soot?
This surely would be a great
boon 'to our health as well as a
boost to our morale at relatively
little expense to the University.
-Curtis L. Mann
EDITORS NOTE: Francis C. Shie,
business manager for residence halls,
when notified of this complaint by
the Daily, said that they are aware
of the situation; have been working.
to eliminate it but have not been
able to get a screen fine enough to
sift the soot coming out of the
chimneys.
Basketball Seating
To the Editor:
THE basketball season has ar-
rived again-and with it the
problem concerning inadequate
seating capacity at Yost Field
House. I have no complaint about
the "first come, first served" ysys-
tem of apportioning the seats- as
the plan is in theory.
But if the system is to work,
queuing at the Field House en-
trances is inevitable. As long as
one queue remains -one linear
queue, everything is fine. But when
what was originally one line be-
comes three or four, it seems less
likely that the first arrived will
have any priority. And when lines
of people become nothing but a
mass of struggling individuals,
there seems no hope.
All this can behtied to what
happened before the MSC game
last Saturday. The earliest fans
democratically formed lines at the
several Field House doorways. As
more arrived, all the lines not only
lengthened, but each became sev-
eral. Finally, when the 'doors were
opened, any semblance of order
dissolved into a swarm of students
fighting for the entrances. The
time at which a person passed
through one of the doors depend-
ed not upon time of arrival, 'but
upon a quick movement heye and
a shove there.
Certainly, if this plan in prac-
tice can reflect its blueprint, it is
much to be desired over the pre-
ferential ticket system: My gripe,
then, concerns the behavior of us
students as we live up to the dem-
ocratic blueprint. Here are a
couple of suggestions which
might, if followed, help:
1) Don Weir might make a for-
mal call for individual student
responsibility in maintaining ord-
erly queues at the Field House.
)2 Or, if that doesn't work,
summon the gendarmes! The
presence of a° few. cops 6ould' urn
the trick where a plea to our "bet-
ter selves would not.
Yours for a higher' correlation
between "first-come" and "first-
served"-
-C. H. Griffin

(Continued from Page 2)
p.m., Ann Arbor Room, Michigan
League. Everyone welcome.
Roger Williams Guild: Dinner,
fellowship.and candlelight service,
6-8 p.m., Guild House.
Michigan Christian Fellowship:
4:30 p.m., Lane Hall Fireside
Room. "The Jew Looks on the
Birth of Jesus." Speaker: Freder-
ick G. Kendal, Director of Israels'
Remnant, Detroit.

Vets' Television

CHRISTMAS MEANS many things to
many people.
To some it means a memorable reunion
amid gay holiday surroundings with long-
unseen loved ones. To others, however, it
means-or can mean-a lonely, oppressive
siege in a hospital, away from friends and
family.
Among those faced with the dreary
prospect 'of spending Christmas away
from home are the patients in the local
Veterans' Readjustment Center. Though
more than three years have passed since
an official proclamation announced the
end 'of World War 2, the war has not end-
ed yet for these men.
The ugly mental wounds inflicted upon
them by war have not yet healed completely.
Though patients are provided with excellent
facilities and the best available remedial
treatment, one important curative means-
recreation-is sadly lacking.
With an almost non-existent recreation
budget, the veterans are forced to rely on
outside organizations for most of their en-
tertainment. Several groups have respond-,
ed splendidly to the need by bringing fre-
quent entertainment shows to the Center.
Time, however, between visits by private
groups can hang heavy. The patients, de-

ciding to do something about the situation
themselves by purchasing a television set,
scraped together $100, far short though of
the amount necessary to buy an adequate
set.
Campus AVC contributed $60 and re-
ceived pledges of support from other
local veterans' organizations, including
the town AVC chapter, and the American
Legion and Veterans of Foreign War
posts.
At least $400 is still needed, however, to
attain the required goal.
AVC is urging all individuals and organi-
zations who want to help make this a "real"
merry Christmas for the veterans at the
Center to give contributions by phoning
2-7570, or by sending them to Art Moskoff
at 1017 Vaughan St.
These veterans have done their share
certainly in the struggle to preserve our
way of life. What better way can we,
the beneficiaries, demonstrate our appre-
ciation of their sacrifice than by helping
brighten their lives?
We who could raise more than $2000 to
show our pride in our band surely cannot
fail to prove our even greater pride in our
former fighting men.
-Buddy Aronson

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in .Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board at the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and ?quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 3 and January 8 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive noti-
fication from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 17 to January 28.
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.

Unitarian Student Guild:
nual pre-Christmas Party, 6
at the Church.

An-
p.m.-

Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club: Supper and Christmas
prograth, 5:30 p.m.

Evangelical and Reformed
dent Guild: Supper meeting,
p.m.

Stu-
5:30

MUSIC

IT SO HAPPENS . .
" Dogs, Reds, Ratings

11 11
THIS IS THE SECOND YEAR we have had
the opportunity to hear Handel's "Mes-
siah," traditional Christmas-time oratorio,
under the direction of Lester McCoy; and
the first concert last night was distinctly
better than last year's performances.
The improvement was most noticeable in
the solo parts, with very fine singing
throughout by tenor Frederick Jagel and
contralto Nan Merriman. John Gurney was
particularly good in the brilliant bass aria
"The Trumpet Shall Sound," where he was
helped out by Graham Young's stirring
trumpet solo. And soprano Doris Doree sang
well occasionally although at other times
she was distinctly not on a par with the
other soloists.
McCoy's conception of the "Messiah" is
quite unusual. His tendency is to slow the
tempo, and this apparently forced him to
cut large portions of the work. Thus he
left out the tenor aria "But Thou Didst Not
Leave His Soul in Hell" and the exciting
chorus "All We Like Sheep Have Gone
Astray."
Last night's version was not only dras-
tically shortened; parts of it were rear-
ranged. ]For example, the "Amen" chorus,
with which the work normally concludes,
was deleted and the "Hallelujah" chorus
moved into its place. Perhaps there was some
good reason for these shifts, but it wasn't
obvious.
The Choral Unon was impressive as usual.
It was handicapped in this rather florid
music by its large size, which made the
interwoven melodies difficult to follow. Em-
ploying a 200-member chorus for this music
.obm +a nat of fa n,1nafnnm of H':r-_

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Anybody Missing? ..
O UR GREATEST FEARS about the mam-
moth dogs that roam this campus seem
to have been realized.
Just yesterday we saw huge Major gam-
boling happily across campus with a man's
necktie drooping from his jaws.
Infiltration Note .. .
OUR UNDERGROUND reporter claims
that there are now two kinds of Com-
munists. To prove his point, he quotes one
of the comrades saying at a political free-
for-all: "I don't care what kind of Com-
munist he is, whether he is pro or whether
he is anti."
* * *
Ya Know What I Means.. .
IN ONE OF OUR classes the student moni-
tor was explaining the faculty rating
system: "Now this report is entirely non ---
this report is entirely non . . . Just don't
put your name on the sheet."
Last Laughs . .
WE DON'T KNOW whether the stu-
dents are using faculty evaluation
New Books at General Library
Bromfield, Louis-The Wild Country. New
York, Harper, 1948.
Eisenhower, Dwight D.-Crusade in Europe.

for revenge or not, but some of them are
tweaking the professors on a few "mno-
torious" marking habits.
One friend of ours gave her instructor
a B plus, plus, plus.
And another friend tells of a young man
in her class who approached his professor
and said: "I certainly would like to hand
you an A, but I've already given out my
10 percent.
* * *
Shrewd...
R EMEMBER LAST WEEK'S fire in Angell
Hall basement? Our date figured some-
body must be burning the faculty rating
forms.
The changes in Army and Air Force
court-martial procedures and penalties an-
nounced by Army Secretary Royal] bring
military justice closer to civilian concepts,
especially as they make its dispensation
more even between officers and enlisted
men. As explained by the Secretary, the
changes ordered are a part of the revisions
of the Articles of War outlined in Title II
of the Selective Service Act. One of the
more important changes still to be made is
establishment of an independent Judge Ad-
vocate General. The Army has until Feb. I
to make that and other changes outlined in
Title II.
While the present revisions . . . are good,
more fundamental ones than these are
neeried tn nrret the ahuses that are so

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

(at 8.
(at 9.
(at 10.
(at 11.
(at 1.
(at 2.
(at 3.

..............
..............

Mon.,
..Wed.,
.. Fri.,
..Mon.,
..Wed.,
..Tues.,
....Thurs.,
.Tues.,
.-T h urs .,
.. Sat.,
..Tues.,
..Thurs.,
..Wed.,
.. Mon.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17,
19,
21,
21,
26,
25,
27,
18,
20,
22,
25,
27,
26,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Coming Events
Michigan Society for Quality
Control: 7:30 p.m., Mon., Dec. 13,1
Michigan Union. Progam: An-
swers to questions by the "Board
of Exerts" and a short talk by
Prof. C. C. Craig. All interested
in the Applications of Statistical
Methods to Quality Control are
invited.
Naval Research .Reserve:. Or-
ganizationial meeting" to -establish
the U. of M. Unit, 7:30 p.m., Mon.,
Dec. 13, 35 Angell Hall. All Naval
Reserve Officers interested 'ii re-
search are invited, to attend.
U. of M. Mathematics Club:
8 p.m., Tues., Dec. 14, West Con-
ference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Prof. A. W. Burks will talk on
Logic and Electronic Digital Com-
puters.
Michigan Actuarial Club: .Mr.
Tom Edwards, Chief Actuary of
the Michigan Life Insurance Com-
pany, will give a talk on the Prob-
lems of A Small Company Actu-
ary With Respect to Agency Com-
pensation, 4:15 p.m., Tues., Dec.1
14,' 172 Rackham Bldg.
All those interested are invited.
Le Cercle Francals: Christmas
meeting, 8 p.m., Mon., Dec. 13,
Michigan League. Carols, games,
refreshments. Members admitted
for the last time this semester.
N.S.A. Committee Meeting: 4
p.m., Tues., Dc. 14, Rm. 3N,
Michigan Union.
Student Religious Association:
Student Peace Fellowship, 7:30
p.m., Mon.,' Lane Hall.
Easy Chair Group: 7:30 p.m.,
Mon., Lane Hall.
AVC: Executive Committee Meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m., Mon., Dec. 13,
Michigan Union. Members are
urged to attend.

i
k
t
r
A
1

Fifty-Ninth Year
- *

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8 ..............
9...........
10..............
11.. .. . . .. .... .
1.. . .. . .. .... .
2. .. .. . ... .. .

Ch.-Met. 1; M.P. 3, M.P. 4 .............. *Mon.,
E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 22; Germ.; Span.......... *Tues.,
Eng. 11; Draw. 3; M.E. 135;
Surv. 1, 2 ........................... *W ed.,
Chem. 1, 3; Ec. 53, 54, 101 ............. *Thurs.,
Draw. 2; E.E. 5; French.............*Fri.,
Draw. 1; M.E. 13; Phys. 45,
M.E. 136 ...........................*Sat.,
C.E. 21*............................*Mon.,
Conflicts and irregular...............*Fri.,

Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan. 18, 2- 5

Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Harriett Friedman ...Managing Editor
Dick Maloy ................City Editor
Naomi Stern .........Editorial Director
Allegra Pafqualetti ....Associate Editor
Arthur Higbee.......Associate Editor
Murray Grant............Sports Editor
Bud Weidenthal ..Associate Sports Ed.
Bev Bussey ......Sports Feature Writer
Audrey Buttery........Women's Editor
Bess Hayes...............Librarian
Business Staff
Richard Halt .......Business Manager
Jean Leonard ....Advertising Manager
William Culman .....Finance Manager
Cole Christian ....Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusivell
entitled to the use for republication
of all news dispatches credited to it or
otherwise credited to this newspaper,
All rights of republication of all other
matters herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, as second-class mail
matter.
Subscription during the regular
school year by carrier. $5.00, by mail,
$6.00.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

19, 2- 5
20, 2- 5
21, 2- 5
22, 2- 5
24, 2- 5
28, 9-12

Evening, 12 o'clock, 4 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may
use any of the periods marked * provided there is no conflict.
The final period on January 28 is available in case no earlier
period can be used.

United World Federalists:
(Continued on Page 8)

Ex-

BARNB

The officers have gone. They've given
up searching my house. Despairingly-
I bat fhavanran't 1,

What good would it do
to look? Nobody can see
him. He disappeared-
-_2 I°_

Pop says policemen always look
for anybody who disappears, Jane. Oh, poor
O'Malley.
1 ut that's silly -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan