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December 11, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-11

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1948

THE MICHIGAN

PACIR FIVE.

- - THE MT- ----------------- S

rciaxr. r i v L'

SL APPROVES:
NSA Convention May
Come Here in Summer

M~odel Studies
At willow Run
To Test Ports

Plans are underway to hold the
next national convention of the
National Students Association at
the University after next year's
summer session.
NSA committee chairman Ar-
lynn Rosen secured Student Leg-
The
City Beat
The Veterans Administration
has asked for bids on preliminary
work for the new 500-bed VA hos-
pital to be erected here.
The huge structure will be lo-
cated one and one-qiarter miles
from University Hospital.
* *. *
Campus area stores will seg-
regate men and women shop-
pers two nights next week.
Following an arrangement
that was inaugurated last year,
Monday will be "Men's Night"
and Tuesday "Ladies' Night."
Sales clerks "will be coached to
be especially helpful" to men
and women on the two nights,
one merchant explained. "We
won't turn away" people who
come out of turn, he said.

islature permission to submit a
)id for the convention at the last
SL meeting. At present she is in
.he process of sending this infor-
mation to NSA's national office'
at Madison.
APPROVAL for the convention,
which would involve more than
700 students from all parts of the
country, must be secured from
Dean of Students Erich A. Wal-
ter and F. C. Shields, director of
the residence halls, Miss Rosen
said.
For the last two years, the
convention has been held at
Madison.
NSA Vice President Gene
Schwartz, who visited Ann Arbor
several weeks ago, was impressed
with the campus and said it would
make a good place for the conven-
tion, Miss Rosen added.
PERMISSION to hold the con-
vention here last year was ob-
tained, she said, but the national
organization decided to have it at
Madison. t
SL permission was granted after
it was clear that the Legislature
would not have financial respon-
sibility for the convention.

Government
Lake Harbor

Backs
Trials

Model studies will be started at
the University's Willow Run lab-
oratory shortly, designed to pro-
duce two small boat refuge har-
bors at Port Austin anc Port San-
ilac on Lake Huron.
The study, under Professors
Chester O. Wisler and Ernest F
Brater, of the Engineering school,
is part of the government's Great
Lakes harbor improvement au-
thorized by Congress in 1945.
NOTICE TO proceed with the
studies was received from Col.
Louis J. Rumaggi, Detroit district
engineer this week.
Models of the two harbors
will be constructed at the labor-
atory on a scale of one to 75
feet. They will be tested in the
new wave tank at Willow Run.
A system of breakwaters which
will afford the best protection
against lake storms for boats seek-
ing the harbor's refuge are the
purpose of the work. A wave ma-
chine will produce storm condi-
tions to test the models.
PROFS. WISLER and Brater
will also be seeking the best pro-
tection against currents and ero-
sion.
Eventually a series of the har-
bors will dot Michigan's east-
ern shoreline. Other harbors to
be developed will include Ham-
mond Bay, Harrisville, Point
Lookout and Oscoda.
The experiments will be paid for
by taxes collected by the Michigan
Waterways Commission on state
registered craft.
OPEN every day
till 8:00 P.M.
Starting Friday, Dec. 10
L. G. BALFOUR Co.
1319 S-University Phone 953.

QFFo"
By RALPH MATLAW
Sir Laurence Oliver's Hamlet album (Victor DM-1273) has two
minor faults, but it is a fine demonstration of the worthy principles of
acting contained in Hamlet's advice to the players. The records were
taken directly from the sound track of the film, so that there are poor
record breaks, occasional confusion, pauses and gaps which can be ex-
plained by the absence of simultaneous visual action. Unlike the su-
perlative Henry V album, (Victor DM-1128) Olivier made, when pas-
sages were specially recorded to present a more unified series of ex-
cerpts, and a more suited to purely auditory responses, Hamlet records
should be heard with the film in mind, although Olivier's conception
is so logical and clear, and the execution of his ideas so faultlessly
brilliant, that the slightest imagination on the part of 'the listener will
complete the necessary picture. Another fault of the set is that it con-
tains only four spoken sides. These are so exciting that the lack of
more is keenly disappointing,
OLIVIER, UNQUESTIONABLY today's foremost actor, has un-
paralleled success in the art of underplaying. This is perhaps the most
difficult aspect of acting, since lines must be integrated not by vocal
power and obstreperous emotion but rather by unified conception pro-
jected with the most subtle uhades of inflection. Both soliloquies in the
album are done in this manner. In the film, "O that this too, too solid
flesh" is done as an interior monologue (just as Olivier did "Upon the
King" in act 4 of Henry V) , and facial expression on the screen prob-
ably adds much to the delivery of the lines. Olivier's interpretation is
a weary realization of the deplorable and tense situation. Instead of
giving vent to rage in the words "O God! God! " he makes them tur-
turous moans. At the line "yet within a month" his ire is aroused, and
by the time he reaches "O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason"
there is a striking bitterness. Olivier's underplaying helps to build up
a tremendous climax, by picking up speed and intensity in the solilo-
quy. If it is done otherwise, the speech tends to be violent, but under-
playing more readily communicates the passion and intensity by inti-
mating the depth of emotion without excessive histrionics.
THROUGHOUT "To be or not to be" one hears the sound effect
of the film, the waves battering the shore, which does not aid the solil-
oquy on records. Olivier starts the soliloquy as a suicide speech, but
changes from the slow and listless, though highly vivid, beginning at
the line "perchance to dream," (The loudness of the line and the tm-
due anguish is not entirely explicable from the recording), to the real-
ization of the impossibility of suicide and the subsequent reflections.
OLIVIER'S ADVICE to the actors is one of the few passages that
actors like Maurice Evans and John Gielgud deliver with something of
the same polish. In Olivier's recording, however, it is not only natural,
but is also entirely consistent with the previous performance, while in
Evans and Gielgud it gives the lie to their style. WhenEvans, for ex-
ample, says "O, it offends me to the soul to see a robustious . . . fellow
tear a passion to tatters, . . . to split the ears of the groundlings," he
characterizes and criticizes his own work perfectly.
IN THE GRAVEDIGGER scene, Olivier is well assisted by Stanley
Holloway. After the skillful coaxing about information, Olivier
launches into a tender, and judiciously cut reminisence about Yorick.
The musical score by William Walton, performed by Muir Mathieson
and the Philharmonica Orchestra, is highly effective and supplements
the dramatic interpirtation. In the Play Scene there is a stately in-
troduction and then a musical reflection of the turmoil of the audi-
ence, though this, without the visual aid is unclear. The Funeral
March is a fitting conclusion to the spectacle.
OIVIER'S interpretation of Hamlet is obviously not the only pos-
sible one, and in view of the medium may even be the extraordinary.
However, fruitless quibbling about Hamlet are insignificant when one
is confronted with a totally convincing performance by a man who has
mastered the art of appearing natural while acting and who is at the
same time an exeremely acute and sensitive reader.

Rates Downed
At Willow Run
Commercial Planes
To BeCharged Less
Lower landing fees for all com-
mercial aircraft have been effect-
ed at the University-owned Willow
Run Airport.
This will not affect private
olanes, which can still use the
field without charge, or airlines
operating under regular con-
tracts.
Airport manager J. P. Weiden-
bach said the fee slash was made
possible by a combined growth of
the airport's activities and facili-
ties.

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THE ALLEN EL
Treat your family and
friends often during
these Christmas weeks.
THE fLLLENEL HOTEL

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126 EAST HURON

For Reservations, Phone 4241.

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Studen't Work-Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant-Miss' Jean Garee
Director of Music-Wayne Dunlap
Organist-J. B. Strickland
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Church School.
9:40 A.M.-Student Bible Study Group -
Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
10:45eA.M.-Morning Worship. "The Light
Hath Shined.
5:00 - 7:00 P.M.-Congregational - Disciples
Guild meeting in Memorial Christian
Church. Annual Christmas Tea. Dr. Carl
Shephard, illustrated lectureon "The Na-
tivity in Art."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Church School.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Press, "What Does . Jesus Mean to
You?"
5:00-7:00 P.M.-Student Guild. The Guildt
has been invited to attend the Annual
Christmas Tea and program to be given
by the Congregational-Disciples Guild at
Memorial Christian Church.
7:00 P.M.-Youth Fellowship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.-Sunday Lesson Sermon
"God the Preserver of Man."
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
Note: This service will not be held on
Dec. 19 and 26 and Jan. 2.
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. John Burt.
12:15 A.M.-After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-High School Young People's Fel-
lowship.
5:30 P.M.-Canterbury Club Supper and
Program, Canterbury House.. Mr. Justin
Kline of the American Youth Hostel
Movement will be the speaker.
8:00 P.M.--Evening Prayer and Bach's Can-
tata "Sleepers, Wake!" with the Schola
Cantorum and small orchestra.
Wednesday, 7:15 a.m. - Holy Communion
(followed by Student Breakfast, Canter-
bury House).
Thursday, 7:30 P.M.-Married Students Club
meets for dessert and program, Canter-
bury House.
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.-Open House, Can-
terbury House.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study Class. Study, of the
teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon,
"Jesus Christ : His Book," by Rev. Loucks.
6:00-8:00 P.M.: Guild Program. Christmas
Candlelight Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry O.,Yoder, Pastor
9:10-10:00 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish Hall
Christmas Program of Worship and
Song.
Tuesday-
7:30-8:30-P.M.: Special Interest Group at
the Center.
Thursday-
7:30 P.M.: Christmas Party and Carol Sing-
Meet at the Student Center.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.-"Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00 A.M.-Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.-Fred Moore, Guest Speaker.
6:15 P.M.-Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.-Cal Didier, Guest Preacher.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
Sermon Topic: "Jesus and the World's
Temptations."
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild will have a spe-
cial Christmas program.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Adult Study Group. Dr. Otto K.
Engelke, Washtenaw County Health De-
partment, discussing: "County Health
Problems."
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship: Rev. Ed-
ward H. Redman preaching on: "Old Test-
ament Prophecy and Americanism."
6:00 P.M.--Unitarian Student Group Pre-
Christmas Party.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's
Advent Sermon will be "When Tomorrow
Comes.'
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild meets in the
Social Hall for supper. Christmas Pro-
gram. Guest Speaker: Mr. A. A. Riddering,
Minister of Christian Education at Red-
ford Avenue Presbyterian Church of De-
troit. Carol singing and film strips. Guild
will go to Inter-Guild Carol Sing after the
meeting.

it

11

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation.

fll 11111 i II kI / ni

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