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December 04, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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JUIDGMENT DAY:
Literary College Faculty
GradingBefrins Tuesday
It'll be evaluation day Tuesday and Wednesday in some 2,200
Literary College classrooms.
The grading of professors on those days will be conducted almost
entirely by students themselves.
ABOUT 3,000 STUDENT monitors will be in charge of obtaining
evaluation forms, distributing them in class, and returning them to
one of three distribution centers.
Their classmates will fill out the forms on an A-B-C-D-E
scale of grading. And the professors and instructors being evalu-
ated won't be in the classrooms.
It has been suggested that they leave while reports are being
'filled out, according to Associate Dean Lloyd S. Woodburne of the
Literary College.
THE MONITORS WILL pick up the forms for their class in one
of three locations.-
The Angell Hall front lobby will be used to issue forms for
the English, speech, mathematics, political science, sociology,
geography, history, journalism, classical studies, astronomy, ori-
ental languages and Russiaij classes.
Monitors for German, Scandinavian, French, Spanish, Italian,
Portuguese, fine arts, economics, anthropology, library science and
philosophy will find their evaluation sheets in the University Hall
main corridor.
FORMS FOR PSYCHOLOGY, zoology, botany, chemistry, physics,
geology and mineralogy may be obtained from Rm. 1014, Natural
Science building.
Forms for the humanities course will be issued at different
stations, depending on the department to which the instructor of
the individual class belongs.
The three stations will open at 7:45 a.m. and close at 5:15 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday. Monitors for classes which meet Tuesday or
Wednesday evening should pick up their forms before 5:15 p.m. of the
day their class meets.
TUESDAY EVENING CLASS monitors will return the forms on
Wednesday morning to the place from which they were obtained.
Wednesday evening class monitors will. return the forms to
1204 Angell Hall.
Forms for classes which do not meet on Tuesday and Wednesday
will be issued between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at Rm. 1204 Angell Hall on
the days following the two-day evaluation period.
THEY MAY BE returned during the same hours to Rm. 1204
after they have been filled out.
Union To Open Travel SerVlice
Want a ride to Carthage, Mo., or a passenger for Springfield,
Mass.?
The Union will do its best to find one for you.
* * * *
A CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY travel service for students will open
Monday at the Union. Students desiring or offering rides may register
by telephone or in person in the Student Offices of the Union from 3
to 5 p.m. daily.
All names will be listed in a master file, and whenever a
ride or.passengers can be secured, the registrants concerned will
be notified.
"The Union, by serving as a central clearing house for travel
requests will save students the trouble of searching for information
on various obscure bulletin boards," Bob Seeber, chairman of the
House Affairs Committee asserted.

Protestants
Attack Race
Segregation
Supports Truman
Civil Rights Plan
CINCINNATI - (1P) - The Fed-
eral Council of the Churches of
Christ in America went all out to-
day for elimination of racial segre-
gation.
In so doing, America's largest
Protestant church group ap-
proved President Truman's civil
rights program in principle-and
then went further.
DELEGATES ADOPTED a re-
port which says in effect that it
is fine to pass a law abolishing ra-
cial segregation, but what really is
needed is to have every man be-
lieve in his heart that non-segre-
gation is 100 per cent right, and
practice it.
The Council's newly-elected
president, Bishop John S.
Stamm of Harrisburg, Pa.,
hailed the action at a news con-
ferc~nce.
"These are the Christian prin-
ciples and the objective toward
which we are striving," he said.
* * *
THE COUNCIL, which embraces
27 demoninations with more than
28,000,000 members, reaffirmed a
declaration that racial segrega-
tion is 'unnecessary and unde-
sirable."
"As proof of their sincerity,
the churches must work for a
non-segregated society."
SENATOR PHOGBOUND
U.S. Congressman

What's Up in the Dorms

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Dolores Palanicer at The Daily or
105 Betsy Barbour).
West Quad's Wenley swimmers
beat Greene House, East Quad
with a score of 49-17.:Greene was
also defeated in water-polo by
a 3-2 margin. This eliminates
Greene from the tournament,
Web McCormick, Wenlye's ath-
letic chairman, announced.
The coke machine, for which
Wenley men have been working,
has finally arrived through the
instrumental aid of Lloyd Sor-
enson, who took charge of the
project. Wenley's president, Fred
Thompson, is breathing peace-
fully now that he won't be pes-
tered about it any more.
* * *
A FLOOD occurred in the Chi-
cago House laundry room Wed-
nesday night, when the tubes at-
tached to a Bendix washer broke
and covered the laundry and
trunk room with four inches of
hot water.
Harley Davidson, since his
heroic act of sticking his finger
in the tube holetill the situa-
tion was brought under control,
has become the most talked
about person in the dorm.
Notices of feats of heroism on

the part of the various residents
"who leaped into the flood to res-
cue drowning clothes," have been
appearing on the bulletin boards.
The letter from Francis C. Shiel,
business manager of residence
halls, which will probably be
forthcoming to thank the resi-
dents for their aid, will undoubt-
edly fail to mention the good time
the men had wading in the warm
water.
THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT has
pervaded West Quad now that
decorations for the annual "Holly
Hop," to take place from 9 p.m.
to midnight today, have been dis-
tributed throughout the dorm.
Most of the Christmas trees,
wreathes, tinsel and other decora-
tions will remain until the Christ-
mas holiday.
High Cost of Living
NEW YORK-Cartel agreements
increased the price of tungsten
carbide, an alloy of diamond-like
hardness used on the cutting edges
of high-speed machine tools, 800
per cent over the prevailing price
in the United States market in
1927.
Its market value was then 1.5
times the value of gold, officials
claimed.

Independents
To Hold Ohio
Convention
Joint AIM, Asselmbly
Delegation Leaves
A joint delegation of Associa-
tion of Independent Men and As-
sembly members leave today for a
regional weekend convention of
the National Independent Stu-
dents Association at Ohio State
College.
* * *
FOSTERING better working
relations between Independent or-
ganizations on different cam-
puses is the main purpose of the
convention.
It will also exchange ideas
about organizational setups and
social events.
AIM President James Kallman
and Ralph Olivanti represent the
men's group. Arlette Harbour and
Joe Wilson are delegates from the
girls' Assembly.
OSU PRESIDENT Howard L.
Bevis will give the convention a
greeting address.
Hitch a Ride
With a Classified

GREETS COMMUNIST ADHERENTS-Friedrich Ebert, named
as mayor of Berlin in the Communist putsch in the city's
Soviet sector, raises his hat in greeting to his cheering followers.
The' Communists took over complete control of the Berlin
City Hall, which lies in the Soviet sector, and barred the acting
mayor of the legally elected anti-Communist government from
his office in the building.
Nuclear Physics Takes To Air
As Balloons Star in Research

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The ten giant balloons swinging
high over the Randell laboratory
this week were not the advertise-
ments for the Ensian some ob-,
servers suspected.
They were a new version of an
old joke, "The sky hook."
- 4 *
FRANK GENEVESE, was con-
ducting experiments last week for
his PhD. thesis on "The Angular
Distribution of Neutron Radiation
from the Photo disintegration
Deutrons, when a problem devel-
oped.

He discovered that he was
counting neutrons on his detec-
tors not only from the original
radiation but that he was also
unwittingly recounting them as
they bounced off the surround-
ing walls, ceiling, or floors. His
solution was the sky-hook.
The cluster of balloons is made
up of ten special, valved, neo-
prene rubber, meteorological bal-
loons. They were kept from escap-
ing by a 300 foot nylon cable. I

r

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pre Id'enor
SpeC'O

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Desk Type
FLUORESCENT LAMPS
Were $13.75 ... Now $8.75
0. D. MORRILL

DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT
STAG or DRAG
MASONIC TEMPLE
BEAT THE BAND
REDUCED RATES: To the Ladies prior to 9:00
"MEET ME AT THE TEMPLE"

"This ca/Is for
an. investigation.!"

314 South State

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WINNERS!

Plastic Coated
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at

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Student Work-Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant-Miss Jean Garee
Director of Music-Wayne Dunlap
Organist-J. B. Strickland
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Church School.
9:40 A.M.-Student Bible Study Group. Rev.
H. L. Pickerill.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship "The Climax
of the Ages."
6:00 P.M.-Congregational-Disciples Student
Guild.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Saturday, 8:15 P.M.-Special Social at the
Center.
Sunday,
9:45 and 11:00 A.M.-Identical Holy Com-
munion Services, with the pastor preaching
on the subject, "God's Enduring Covenant
with Man."
3:00 to 5:00 P.M.-Christmas Tea for Women
Students.
5:30 P.M.-Supper and Program of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
Wednesday, 4:00 P.M.-Coffee Hour.
Friday, 6:00 P.M.-Christmas Dinner for
Married Couples.
Friday, 8:15 P.M.-Our Annual Christmas
Party.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boioe, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Church School.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Schmale, "Jesus and the Kingdom of
God."
4:00 P.M.-Youth Fellowship Hike and Roast
5:30 P.M.-Student Guild to meet at the
parsonage, 432 South Fourth Ave., Speak-
er: John Loui, "Christianity in China."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.--Sunday Lesson Sermon.
"God the Only Cause and Creator."
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.--Holy Communion.
9:00 AM.-Holy Communion ( followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.-Holy Communion. Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
12:30 P.M.-After-Service Fellowship
5:30 P.M.-Young People's Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-Canterbury Club Supper and pan-
el discussion on "The Episcopal-Presby-
terian Proposals for Unity."
8:00 P.M.-Evening Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. Robert Tourigney. (Next Sunday eve-
ning: Bach's Cantata, "Sleepers,Wake.")
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.-Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury
House).
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.M.-Open House, Canter-
bury House.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation'
Howard Farrar, Choir Director

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH

CHURCH OF CHRIST

SPECIAL
XMAS
OFFER

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study Class. Study of the
teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon "Gifts
for Christ," by Rev. Loucks.
6:00-8:00 P.M.-Guild Program. Rev. Loucks
wil speak on "Our Baptist Heritage."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
9:10-10:00 A.M.-Bible Class the the Center.
10:30 A.M.-Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.-L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall. Pastor Yoder, speaker-"The Church
Year."
Tuesday, 7:30-8:30 P.M.-Special Discussion
Group at the Center.

YMCA Bldg., Fourth Ave.
Carl York Smith, Minister
10:30 A.M.-Radio Program, WPAG. "No Bet-
ter Name than Christian."
11:00 A.M.-Jesus Completes the Twelve."
7:30 P.M.-"Moses, Greatest of the Jews.

$475

MONOGRAMMED
at no extra cost

SUEDE COVERED BOX - only $3.25
CRAFT PRESS
330 Maynard

10 1 South Main

330 South State Street

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University of Michigan
Winners for week of
November 20th, 1948
HERB BARTON
W. M. BIRSTON
JIM EBERSOLE
TOM EMERSON
ROBERT W. FRICK
JOE HILL
C. J. HOYT
JERRY HONE
JAMES O. KISTLER
BOB KNECHT
BILL LAIRD
JOE LAIRD
J. A. LINDQUIST
R. M. McG UIRE
C. 1,. NORWOOD
A. PEPITONE
ROBERT SPIEGEL
Watch Fo'r
Group Prize
Winners!f

Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.-"Your Radio Choir," WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00 A.M.--Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.-Worship Service. "A Memorial
Every Year."
6:15 P.M.-Grace Bible Guild.
7:30 P.M.-Worship Service. Sermon, "Shall
So Come."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
sermon topic: "Jesus and the World's Bur-
dens."
5:30 P.M.-Wesleyan Guild. Movie on Cast-
anear Project in Puerto Rico and students
will pack Christmas boxes for overseas.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
Interdenominational
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards-Chaplain
10:45 A.M.-Divine Worship. Sermon: "Bruis-
ed Reeds."
10:45 A.M.-Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.-Study and Discussion: Inter-
Faith Study, "Judaism."
5:30 P.M.-Fellowship Supper.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.--Adult Group. Mr. Douglas Wil-
liams on "Dunbar and the Community."
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship. Sermon by
Mr. Redman, "Is Christianity Really Un-
American?"
6:30 P.M.-Unitarian Students. Prof. George
Kiss speaking on "Behind the Iron Cur-
tain," an account of his' observations in
Europe last summer.

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1308 So.

U. - Doors East of So. Forest

Now oi4 ie Caiji s

The finest in

Select Groceries and

Quality Meats

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W, P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers

I

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11

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