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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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TENNIS SETS PACE:
City Sport Shops Disclose
Coeds' Interest in Athletics

By JIM MARCHEWKA
Michigan men have made names
for themselves in sports but the
heavy sales in sports equipment
for women indicate that the
Michigan Co-ed is also on the
ball.
The early semester rush to the
sports shop shows that women go
in for sweat socks, T shirts, sweat
shirts, and gym shoes in a big
way. Crew caps and white sweat
shirts with the block "M" make a
hit with the girls according to a
sports clerk at a popular campus
shop.
HE ADDED that they come into
the shop for their favorite brand
in saddle shoes and loafers. Ten-
nis, archery, and golf were rated

as the top three favorites accord-
ing to the volume of sales in
sporting goods.
Enthusiasm for sports is out-
standing because the University
offers instructions in individual
sports, Marie D. Hartwig, Asso-
ciate Supervisor in Physical Edu-
cation, declared. Heavy partici-
pation in basketball, volley ball,
and softball has inspired a coop-
erative spririt as well as group
work among Michigan women.
Miss Hartwig pointed out that
Michigan women need little equip-
ment that is available on the cam-
pus. Tournaments and meets are
promoted by the Department of
Physical Education and the WAA.

n 1TNo need to t1
HOCK THE FAMILY JEWELS
to get your wateh repaired!
THE VETERAN WATCH REPAIR SERVICE will
clean your watch and install any needed parts for a
maxinum price of
THE COST MAY BE LESS depending on the needs of
your watch. If your watch is very old or any unusual
make, you will be given an estimate of cost of repair
work before work is begun.
CHRONOGRAPHS and CLOCKS REPAIRED
at new LOW PRICES
e EIGHTEEN DAYS SERVICE OR LESS
ALL REPAIRS GUARANTEED
e VETERAN WATCH REPAIR SERVICE "pick-up" stations
are located at:
. STATE DRUG COMPANY, Cor. Packard and State St.
WEST LODGE P.X., Willow Run Village.
"HERBERT," 1099 Conway Court, Willow Run Village.
. <. ><"""> Voo o o o o o o...o.

Black Takes
Tax Scandal
Investigation1
LANSING, Mich. - (A') - At-
torney General Eugene F. Black
moved today to recapture control
of an investigation intoa report-
ed scandal in the collection of
states sales taxes.
Black broke the case Wednes-
day with a charge that the State
Revenue Department improperly
settled a sales tax "fraud" case
against a Detroit dress shop
chain at a loss of $150,000 tosthe
state.
Governor Sigler moved in quick-
ly Wednesday and ordered his
own investigation through the
Wayne Bounty prosecutor of a re-
ported bribery charge.
* * *
TODAY FLACK SAID "The
Wayne County prosecutor is not
going to handle this. I will take
it over to see there is no white-
wash, besides this is a State mat-
ter."
Black arranged with Ernest
Conlon of Grand Rapids, Wayne
County Revenue Department
Administrator, to meet him at
the prosecutor's office in De-
troit at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow to go
over the case.
Black and Conlon had words in
the governor's office when Black
first demanded to be part of the
conference. Conlon insisted Sig-
ler had told him to refer the
whole matter to the prosecutor.
* * *
YESTERDAY CONLON told
Sigler that $5,000 had been paid
by an official of the Galperin
Dress Shop chains to obtain a
clear audit of his sales tax ac-
count in 1945 or 1946.
Black added to the confusion
late today by releasing an ex-
change of correspondence writ-
ten last April which had brought
down on Conlon an official rebuke
for disclosing to the press sales
tax information contrary to law.
GUILD
NEWS

DETROIT-(/P)-A doctor to-
day urged the motor car industry
to redesign the automobile at any
cost to cut down the nation's traf-
fic death toll.
Dr. Fletcher D. Woodward of
Charlottesville, Va., ,blueprinted
a drably-finished, boxlike vehicle
with an interior like an airplane
cockpit.
He told the Michigan State
Medical Society's annual conven-
tion that he was convinced such
a passenger car would save lives.
S* * *
"OUR HIGHWAYS are becom-
ing increasingly laden with cars
driven by average people," Dr.
Woodward said, "and it appears
inevitable that these machines
will continue to collide, pass on

turns, fail to observe stop signs,
leave the road at high speeds and
afflict mankind such as they have
in the past."
Dr. Woodward's car would look
like this:
The driver would step in
through a single door and seat
himself behind a steering column
that moved forward under pres-
sure of 100 pounds. He would
fasten a safety belt around him
like an airplane pilot. He would
look through plastic windshields
and windows that surround the
car almost entirely except for sup-
porting columns necessary to pro-
tect the car if it overturned.
* * *
HE WOULD latch his seat, if it

END TRAFFIC DEATHS:
Doctor Calls for Redesigned 'Safety' C

normally swung forward, to lock
it in position. Then he would push
another lock so that his children
could not open the door.
On his dashboard would be
crash pads of sponge rubber pad-
ding to protect his head. There r
would be no projecting knobs or "
buttons in the interior of the car,
and very few on the outside.
* * *
The hood of his car would be
lower and shorter, giving the ca
a more boxlike appearance but
allowing him to see further.
His speedometer would be di-%
rectly in front of him and beside
miles per hour speed, would indi-
cate the stopping distance in feet;
under average driving conditions.

U.N. DELEGATES ENJOY A LAUGH--Soviet Deputy Foreign
Minister Andrei Y. Vishinsky (seated) head of the Russian
delegation, enjoys a laugh with Warren R. Austin as head of the
U.S. delegation passes his desk at afternoon session of the United
Nations General Assembly in Paris. Vishinsky charged at the day-
old Assembly meeting that certain powers are attempting to create
a "disunited nations."
TO MEET IN 1950:
Federalists Plan Convention
To Draft World Constitution

I' seV~Slike YeedY
that t stcarted*

I

it

Many of the student

church

guilds and clubs are holding open-
houses this weekend. The Luther-
an Student Association is holding
one at 8:30 p.m. today in the Zion-
Lutheranparish hall, 309 E.
Washington Friday, from 8 to 12
p.m. the Newman Club is holding
their weekly open house in the
St. Mary" chapel clubrooms.
Westminster Guild will hold
two open houses this weekend at
the church, 1432 Washtenaw. Fri-
day night from 8 to 11 p.m. there
will be mixers, refreshments,'
games and dancing. From 2-5 p.m.
tomorrow, a listening party will
be held with refreshments at the
church.
The Roger Williams Guild is
meeting at the Guild House, 502
E. Huron at 8:30 p.m. Friday for a
treasure hunt. Picnicers should
come in suitable dress. The Guild's
supper program at 6:00 p.m. Sun-
day, will feature a student panel
discussing "Summer Service Divi-
dends."

A World People's Constitutional
Convention to draft a form of
universal government will be the
principal talking point for all
United World Federalist's activ-
ities here.
THE PLAN, which calls for a
meeting of elected delegates rep-
resenting the peoples of the world,
was originated in the British
House of Commons. The conven-
tion will meet in 1950 possibly un-
der the auspices of Nehru and the
Indian government.
Professor Preston W. Slosson of.
4VC... "
(Continued from Page 1)
AVC had planned to sponsor here
next week. Communists and anti-
Communists were slated to appear
on the forum.
But the proposed Communist
speaker refused to appear on the
same platform as the anti-Com-
munist after the University barred
an indicted Communist leader
from participating, Tumin said.
AVC Treasurer Ed Tumin, grad
student in English, said the local
attempt by Communists to gain
control of AVC is part of a na-
tion-wide move.
* .* *
RE SAID the Communists seek
to hold control of enough local
AVC chapters to have a majority
at the national convention, set for
Cleveland in late November.

the History Department and fac-
ulty advisor for the. United World
Federalists, emphasized that the
group does not advocate the elim-
ination of the United Nations at
this time.-He believes the power of
the U.N. could be implemented by
having those colonies still unfit
for independence put under the
collective jurisdiction of the U.N.
THE UNITED World Federal-
ists plan to conduct seminars con-
cerning world government here at
the University. These will be con-
ducted by Chester J. Byrns, -a
teacher from George Washington
University in Washington, D.C.
and now a law student here.

In the Telephone business
...for 21 years!
"It may seem like a long time to you ... but to me it's
just like yesterday that I started.
"Guess that's because it's always been interesting...
always so many phases of the business to learn...
always something different and vital to do.
"Right now I'm one of 125,000 men and women who
have been in telephony for 21 years or more. They call
us the 'Telephone Pioneers of America.'

I
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DANCE
TON ITE
at the
WOLVERINE
DEN
To the Music
of CLIFF HOFF and
his All-Campus Combo,
featuring volcals by
Pat DuPont
The DEN
1311 So. U., 2 Doors East of Forest,

NE jU("H
A AO

SHE OIII

"I've seen the telephone industry come a long way-
improving methods, developing new means of com-
munications, constantly growing. But in many fields
we've hardly scratched the surface; we're still pioneer-
ing. The future is full of challenges, and opportunities!"
BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM
'O . p\ATED (L Q

When you think
of "GOOD FOOD"
think of the
DEN
Breakfast, Lunch and
Dinner at the DEN
Open 7:30 A.M. 'til 1 A.M.

GE T NEXtr,,O~

the Bruiser
Rugged all-weather footgear
cut on a truly comfortable
Moccasin pattern.
Handsome Golden Chiestnut
leather, stout Stormwelt,
Weatherproof soles.

Many Other Styles
at from
195 195

current
rate
O N S AV IN G S
...Insured to $5,000.
Any amount opens
your account at
ANN ARBOR
FEDERAL
Savings and Loan Assn.
116 N. Fourth Avenue
Opposite the Assets Over
Court Hous* ;11,000,000
DF)ANCE
TONITE
at the
WOLVERINE
DEN

Johnny Long's "JUST LIKE THAT"-
from the Signature diskerie.
Johnny Long (Duke University--Sigma Nu) comes up
with a danceable, bright bounce. It's a Long original!
If you shoulld ask Johnny how he came to write it, he'll light
up a Camel and say: "Experience! I know from
experience what music suits my band best-
just as I learned from experience that Camels
suit my 'T-Zone' to a T'.
CVOI Try Camels on your "T-Zone"-"T" for taste,
"T" for throat. See for yourself why, with
Johnny Long and millions of other smokers,
Camels are the "choice of experience."

,sly
x
e .Y
1,: ,A H L t

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