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November 24, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l IVY-TCHItA N- nA1T."

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a as M t.1-1-v l\ ilflTV- -L . - J 1 N Z ~A1 '.AWIV .rAPXI E J'

uAx, NUYE3MER 24; 1948

Michigan's Big ine amps

Lea Irish in AP

Poll

l.,

Oregon Breaks Top Ten;
Upset, Penn State Dives
Wolverines Take 105 First Place Votes
As Ariy and Notre Dame Remain Idle

'BIG MOOSE' TO HEAD HERD:

i

Al Wistert Succeeds Tomasi as 'M' Football Captain

'M' Defense Tough, But
Offense Deserves Praise

*

*'*

NEW YORK - (P) - Michigan
held the lead as four of the top
10 teams bettered their positions
today in the next-to-last Asso-
ciated Press Poll of the season of
leading college football teams.
The Wolverines, who wound up
their second istraight unbeaten
season with a 13-3 victory over
Ohio State Saturday, polled 105
first place votes out of 190 ballots.
Their point total was 1,726.
* * *
NOTRE DAME held second
place, 103 points behind. The Irish
got 38 first place votes. Other first
place ballots went to third place
Army (5) ; fourth place North
Carolina (14); fifth place Cali-
fornia (3); sixth place Oklahoma
(13); ninth place Clemson (8);
eleventh , place Michigan State
(3) and twelfth place Georgia (1).
North Carolina moved from
fifth to fourth, swapping places
with California. Oklahoma
jumped from eighth to sixth by
smashing Kansaas, 60-7. Penn
State, the sixth place team a,
week ago, plunged to 18th by
losing 7-0 to Pittsburgh.
Southern Methodist moved from
10th to eighth and Oregon which
wound up its season by not get-
ting invited to the' Rose Bowl,
climbed into the No. 10 spot from
13th.
FOUR OF THE first ten teams
have finished their regular season

-Michigan, California, North-
western and Oregon. However
California and Northwestern will
meet in the Rose Bowl.
The team standings, figured
on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 point
basis are as follows: (first place
votes in parentheses)
1. MICHIGAN (105) .....1,726
2. Notre Dame (38) ......1,623
3. Army l(5) .............1,293
4. North 'Carolina (14) . .1,071
5. California (3) .........907
6. Oklahoma (13) .........839
7. Northwestern ..........730
8. Southern Methodist ... 540
9. Clemson (8) ...........428
10. Oregon ...............316
11. Michigan State (3) 258; 12.
Georgia (1) 250; 13. Minnesota
96; 14. Tulane, 85; 15. Vanderbilt,
52.

By MURRAY GRANT
72?.::.:(Daily Sports Editor)
Michigan switched from youth
to age yesterday as Dom Tomasi,
aged 20, handed the reins of lead-
ership over to Al Wistert, aged 32.
At a meeting of this year's foot-
ball letter-winners; Wistert be-
came the fourth straight lineman
to captain the Wolverines.
* * *
"BIG MOOSE" thus gained his
second honor in as many days,
since he was named to the annual
Big Nine team on Monday. And
the tradition of "Wistert at tac-
kle" became just a little more im-
bedded in Michigan football his-
tory.
He follows his two brothers,
Francis and Albert, at the tac-
kle slot for the Wolverines and
is now one up on his brothers.
Neither Ffancis, 1932 to '34
nor Albert, 1940 to '42, cap-
tained the Wolverines.

i

Now Al has one more goal be-
fore he can emulate his brothers.
They both were chosen as All-
Americans in thier senior years.
The election of Wistert as cap-
tain is a fitting tribute to a great
athlete. Despite the fact that,
most athletes are beyond their
prime at 32, the "Grand Old Man
of Football" has shown some of
his younger teammates how to
hustle and move throughout the
season.
HIS WORK in Saturday's Ohio
State -game was marvelous. He
was a fifth man in the Buckeye
backfield for a great part of the
afternoon and a couple of his
horse collar tackles were brilliant.

v

By PRES HOLMES
"Millions for defense, but not
one cent for tribute."
This discerning statement was
made some years ago by Stephen
Decatur, and is perfectly applica-
ble today, but let's change the
word defense to "offense."
SCRIBES AND armchair quar-
terbacks have tended to forget the
tribute that is truly due the point
getters of the Maize and Blue.
Millions of words were offered
about the Wolverine defense, but
few about the offense.'
The Michigan team of 1947
had the offense, this year's team
had the defense. That seems to
be the opinion, let's take a look.
In the six Conference games
played this year the Maize and
Blue opponents have scored 37
points, an average of a little bet-
ter than a touchdown a game. Not
bad at all.
The 1947 juggernaught had a
grand total of 40 points scored
against them in the six Big Nine
games they played. Three points
difference from this year's defen-
sive squad, a matter of a few
points after those six touchdowns,
not a decisive difference.
LET'S LOOK at the records on
offense.
Michigan's powerful offen-
sive combination scored 172
points last year against North-

western, Minnesota, Illinois, In-
diana, Wisconsin, and Ohio
State.
The Maize and Blue this year
pushed across 190 points against
five of the same teams, with Pur-
due swapped for Wisconsin. They
scored 40 points against each of
the two teams, and, therefore,
these games don't affect the totals
one way or another.
It boils down to the fact that
Michigan's "defensive" team this
year scored 18 points, three touch-
downs, more than last year's "of-
fensive" powerhouse.
THERE ISN'T anyone alive
who has seen Michigan play this
year who would deny that the
Wolverine defensiveline came up
with anything short of miracles at
least once in every game.
Sure, the other team put a
couple of holes in the wall every
now and then, but when the blue
chips were down and the pres-
sure was on the going got
mighty rough for any touchdown
hopes any opponent might have.
But don't sell the other half of
the team short. It takes touch-
downs to win a ball game, regard-
less of whether the opposition
scores or not.
Let's have a few cheers for the
point getters on the team, they
did a terrific .job too!

DOM TOMASI
... just retired

NO HICK ON ALERTNESS:
Bob-Erben To Head '49 Offensive Line

By BILL HENDERSON
With six regular offensive line-
men lost through graduation, the
sole veteran returning for the 1949
gridiron campaign is Bob Erben,
rugged 190 pound Wolverine cen-
ter.
ALL SEASON, Bob's fight and
aggressiveness has marked him as
one of the key men in Coach Jack

Blott's offensive line. His alert-
ness paid off against Art Mura-
kowski and company of North-
western by recovering an end zone
fumble to score the clinching
touchdown.
Though Bob has appeared most-
ly in the role of offensive center,
he is also a stellar defensive per-
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former and perhaps next season
will play the dual role of defen-
sive line backer and offensive
center.
HAILING FROM AKRON, Ohio
Bob made the all-state team at
center in 1942 while playing for
Akron West High School. ,Ie spent
three years as a parachute rigger
in the Navy and after his dis-
charge Bob decided to enter
Michigai. With the hope of secur-
ing a business position in South
America upon graduating in 1950,
Bob is majoring in Spanish.
Since the Navy game Bob has
been nicknamed 'Clipper' by his
teammates because of the clipping
penalty called against him in that
contest. The fact that movies of
the game proved that Bob did not
clip the midshipman, did not de-
ter his mates from pinning the
'Clipper' label on the center.
Football is not Bob's only sports
interest. Last year he was a catch-
er on the varsity baseball team
I and played junior varsity basket-
ball.
Ortmann and
Wahl Chosen
All-StarSophs
Add the names Chuck Ortmann
and Al Wahl to the list of Michi-
gan players receiving post-season
football honors.
Before the multi All-Ameri-
can selections start rolling in,
the writers for Sports Extra's
magazine got together and chose
their best first-year-men to an
all-star all-sophomore team.
Ortmann was named at half-
back along with SMU's Kyle Rote,
while Al Wahl was given a tackle
berth, despite his strictly dcfensive
assignments for Michigan.
Ortmann's season total out-
shines the sophomore records of
Tom Harmon and Bob Chappuis.
The youngster from Milwaukee
completed 30 passes for 850 yds.,
which coupled with his rushing,
puts him above 1100 total yards.
Wahl, sidelinded most of his
freshman year by an injury,
stepped into the defensive tackle
slot quite easily this fall. He's tall,
weighs over 200 pounds, but is as
agile as a cat.-

But you could not single out
any one game as Wistert's best.
He plays them all to the hilt and
his name comes over the loud-
speaker more often than any
other.
The big 6'3", 218 pound tackle
played his third season this year,
but only his second for the Wol-
verines. After his discharge from
the Army he matriculated at Bos-'
ton University for a year. There
he made varsity in his freshman
year, but followed in his brothers'
footsteps by coming to Michigan
in 1947.
HE BECAME a fixture in the
defensive line almost immediately.
As "Fritz" Crisler instituted his
two-team system, he chose Wistert
to team with Ralph Kohl as the
defensive tackles. And sinceaWis-
tert has come onto the scene Mich-
igan's opponents have scored a
grand total of 97 points, or an
average of 5.1 points in each of
the 19 games he's played.
And Wistert is no slouch on
offense either. At least three
times this year he has trotted
onto the field when it was Mich-
igan's ball a few yards from pay-
dirt. And it was always through
the mammoth hole he made
that the touchdowns w e r e
scored.
To Wistert goes an unenviable
job. He must lead a Wolverine
team that everyone will be trying
to upset. Riding on the crest of a
23 game winning streak, the Wol-
verines will be ripe for upset next
season, and Wistert will have his
jab cut out for him.
But we'll agree with Coach Ben-
ny Oosterbaan, who was mighty
pleased with the choice, as he said
"He'll make a fine leader because
of his age and experience. And I'm
sure he'll be an inspiration to the
team next year."
Hack Wilson,
.RBI Cham p,
Grounds out
BALTIMORE - (/P)- Lewis
(Hack) Wilson, baseball's one time
roly-poly "bad boy" whose name
got on top of the batting records
and stayed there, died today.
In 1930, with the Chicago Cubs,
Wilson hit 56 home runs. No Na-
tional Leaguer has ever equalled
that numer. He even outslugged
Babe Ruth of the Yankees that
year.
In the same great season, Hack
batted in 190 runs and that figure
still stands as tops for the major
leagues. It beat the 175 batted in
by Lou Gehrig of the Yankees in
1927.

4-.

-
A S
I2
-
- cce.

i

... newly hired
Resident Hall intramural
swimming competition opened
last night with Hayden House
whipping Lloyd House, 44-22;
Hinsdale House squeezing past
Michigan House, 38-28; Adams
House trouncing Vaughan
House, 48-18; and Cooley
House swamping Allen Rumsey
House, 49-12.

AL WISTERT

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7,200 years

of college ... and still learning
THE Bell Telephone Laboratories is
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engineering. On its staff are 1,622 engineers
and scientists with college degrees. Among
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They study many things. How to speed
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