100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WENESD~AY, NOVEM3'1ER 24, 1948

Tit MICHIGAN .DATLYs

.. ,.. ..... saa ... is av:.u av.a..._..araaa.a.r:.a

Congress Set
To Look into
Huge Profits
Total Heading for
Twenty Billion
WASHINGTON - (5) - Profits
are shooting toward an estimated
$20,000,000,000 record this year
and Senator Flanders (Rep., Vt.)
said today Congress wants to know
what is going to be done with
them.
He heads an inquiring subcom-
mittee which will open hearings
Dec. 7 in a broad study of the huge
earnings. What it learns will in-
fluence legislation in many fields,
he predicted.
* * *
SENATOR O'MAHONEY (Dem.,
Wyo.), member of the group, told
a reporter:
"I think we will find some start-
ling evidence that something must
be done about monopolies."
Flanders said it is important
that the hearings be completed
4 before Congress tackles the ma-
jor issues headed its way.
"First of all," said Flanders,
"we should learn how and why
these profits are accumulated.
* * *
FLANDERS suggested these as
prime questions:
1. How much of the profits re-
sult from inflation and must be
kept in business and industry as
a possible cushion for a recession
or depression?
2. How much of the profits can
the government tap and how?
3. Are the profits to be dis-
tributed to shareholders, or to
consumers through lower prices,.
or to employes through a fourth-
round of postwar wage in-
creases?
4. How much of the profits are
needed.to improve or expand plant
facilities for greater production
and lower consumer cost?
* * *
"WE NEED ALL this back-
ground information for legisla-
tion in almost every field that will
come before the next Congress,"
Flanders said.
O'Mahoney said that "big
business is fearful of an excess
profits tax and wants to set up
arguments against it." He al-
ready has urged such a tax on
corporations.
O'Neill Film Will
Be Shown Friday
The Art Cinema League and
Student World Federalists have
selected for their film this week
Eugene O'Neill's penetrating study
of 'seamen "The Long Voyage
Home" which will be shown at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urday in the Architectural Audi-
torium.
John Ford's direction, Dudley
Nichol's screen play and the per-
formances by John Wayne, Barry
Fitzgerald and Thomas Mitchell
have all combined to make this
film an all-time favorite.
General admission tickets will
go on sale today at the booth in
University Hall.

DAI-SY, DAI-SY:
Bicycle Seen Regaining
Popularity in America

By The Associated Press
The bicycle is making a re-
markable come-back in America.
Its revived popularity is more
than mildly suggestive of cfling's
golden era back in the Gay Nine-
ties. That was before the auto-
mobile eclipsed the bike as a means
of practical and recreational
transport.
* * *
THE BICYCLE industry, a small
affair only a few years ago, now
IRA To Hold
Jam Session
Final plans for an inter-racial
jam session to be held Dec. 5 in
the Hussey Room of the League
were discussed at last night's
meeting of . the Inter-Racial As-
sociation.
The jam session, which will fea-
ture Art Buchbinder and Mack
Ferguson, is a benefit program
sponsored by the IRA, with the
assistance of the Union. The ses-
sion will last from 8 to 10:30 p.m.
with an admission charge of 0.42.
Also discussed at the meeting
were plans for a movie to be shown
Dec. 10 and 11 in Hill Auditorium,
to be sponsored jointly by the IRA
and the Art Cinema League.
Leon Recthman, IRA chairman,
announced that the second in a
series of three leaflets sponsored
jointly by the IRA and the Stu-
dent Legislature is just about ready
for distribution. He also reported
that an NSA subcommittee and the
IRA were arranging for a group of
short educational features to be
shown in local theatres.

expects 1948 sales will far out-
strip 1947's record 2,700,000 total.
There are some 17,000,000
bikes in use now, says the Bi-
cycle Institute of America. Just
before the war there were 12,-
000,000.
Bicycle institute officials say
high prices on new and used cars
have forced many in low income
groups to use bikes to get to work
and school. During the war many
learned it was cheaper and more
fun to ride a bike than operate a
car.
AND, SAYS John Auerbach, ex-
excutive secretary of the insti-
tute, "Americans began to wake
up to the fact that cycling is ex-
cellent exercise. They are learning
that cycling is the perfect all-
round body conditioner. It's espe-
cially good for stomach muscles.
Did you ever hear of a bicycle
racer having stomach ulcers? I
haven't."
He says women find cycling
holds down their weight and
parents look to bicycles in in-
creasing numb rs as developers
of sturdy children.
Since the war sales of young
children's bikes have risen 33 per
cent, but more adults have turned
to cycling, too. There's been a 40
per cent boost in the number of
cycling clubs.
Bike racing is enjoying an up-
swing in popularity. The recent
6-day race in New York drew more
than 90,000 spectators.
But, the bicycle in America still
has a long way to go to approach
its popularity in Europe-or that
of the motor car in the United
States.

Churches Set
Services To
Give Thanks
SRA To Serve
Annual Breakfast
Special Thanksgiving services
will be held in Lane Hall, the
Congregational church and St.
Mary's chapel tomorrow.
Setting the mood for the day,
the Student Religious Association
will be hosts for their second an-
nual breakfast at 9 a.m. in Lane
Hall. Dewitt C. Baldwin, S.R.A.
program director, will speak on
"Universality of Thanksgiving.
*x x
RESERVATIONS must be made
by 3 p.m. today at Lane Hall. For-
eign students are especially in-
vited.
Worship services will be given
at the Congregational church at
10:30 a.m. Dr. Brett Kenna, of
the Methodist Church, will
preach on "The Eternal Good-
ness." Music will be provided by
the Congregational choir. Sev-
eral hymns by Isaac Watts will
be sung, honoring his bicenten-
ary anniversary.
Among the churches taking part
in the services are the First Meth-
odist, Congregational, Presbyter-
ian, Baptist, Bethlehem Evangel-
ical, Trinity Lutheran, Zion Luth-
eran, West Side Methodist, and
Memorial Christian.
Masses will be administered at
7, 8, and 9 a.m. at St. Mary's
Chapel.

"

THEY ALL HAVE ROSE FEVER-Northwestern University's
football team stands on the roof of a sorority house in Evanston
as a huge crowd of students assembled for a pep rally to
celebrate the selection of the Wildcats to play in the Rose Bowl.j
Team members include Quarterback Don Burson (lower left),
Capt. Alex Sarkisian (center, wearing cap), Tackle George Mad-
dock (dark coat), Back Peewee Day (at right of Sarkisian) and
Guard Jim Parsegian (leather jacket).
what's Up in the Dorms

IL

3.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Dolores Palanker at The Daily or
105 Betsy Barbour).
Assembly, Independent Women's
organization, will be asking for
contributions from Nov. 29 to Dec.
3 towards their sponsorship of one
displaced student.
With the $1,000 it hopes to raise,
the association will provide for
the complete maintenance of one
woman student, including housing
in a women's dormitory, books and
miscellaneous expenses.
LONG DELAYED plans for
Betsy Barbour's recreation room
are about to bear fruit.
Finally, the University's own
"unplaced students," 13 of which
at one time called the Barbour rec
room their home, have at last
found rooms in the various dorms.
A redecoration job, consisting of
painting, and new drapes and up-
holstery made by the residents,
will reconvert the room into what
it was originally meant to be.
S* * *
LATEST REPORTS indicate
that the West Quad's annual
"Holly Hop" will be a sell-out with
only 400 tickets being distributed
among the eight houses in the
Quad.
Besides a band, Thoburn Stiles,
publicity chairman, announces
there will be a string ensemble
playing for refreshments in the
downstairs alcove, a pianist in the
main lounge and an organist on

the first floor concourse. The West;
Quad Glee Club may also sing;
carols.
Santa Claus, in reality Bud
Murray, social chairman of Chi-
cago House, was on a ticket-sell-
ing spree last Thursday which led
the men to believe he was giving
them away. Or at least this may
explain why he only sold half a
dozen.
d
Library. ..
(Continued from Page 1)
"backed" and it is reinformed with
cotton flannel.
BOARDS ARE cut, using the
sample back for size. In fact, the
bindery trys to cut even the buck-
ram or cloth to match any previ-
ously bound volume of the same
title.
Rag paper strips to increase
the width of the back of the
book then are inserted into the
boards, making a "case." The
vital statistics-title, call num-
ber, and author-are stamped
on this case. After stamping,
the book is ready to be "cased
in." It is pasted and allowed to
stand over night in a two hun-
dred pound press between cher-
ry pressing boards.
That isn't all the bindery does.
It reinforces rare documents with
scarce Japanese tissue and makes
honorary diploma covers. In fact
there is still one lying around that
the Queen of Rumania never came
to the University to accept.
Maybe sometime spiral bindings
will usurp the place of cloth bind-
ings, or looseleafs will come into
the limelight, but until then the
bindery in the library basement
will continue to be a hospital for
lacerated covers and broken backs.

Ge S. Air Force
A-6 SURPLUS

SHEEPLINED
BOOTS
Brand
New

, . .,;.

YOU CAN STILL BE A WINNER-
GET INTO THE PHILIP MORRIS
SCORECAST CONTEST NOWA
"WATCH FOR
THE GRAND PRIZE
WINNERS"
p b* ez Te/"
HERE'S WHAT YOU WIN FOR YOURSELF:
HEEWATYOCN I FOR YOURLII GROUPOl
HERE"S WHAT YOU CAN WIN FOR YOUR LIVING GROUP OR CLUB!

I

BROWN LEATHER UPPERS -BLACK RUBBER LOWERS
SMALL - MEDIUM - LARE
Wear With or Without Shoes

SPECIAL OFFERING
Genuine LEVI's
WAIST BAND OVERALLS
$3.47

''
. 'f .
;:: f:r,:.'

SAM'S STORE

I

122 E. Washington St.

Open Evenings 'til 7 P.M.

.,
4

j i
ff/ f ,a
AWit::, £ N o O
f < {..rJr
IFT SLIPPERS"
inglamngrajo ~ti.. pstlsan
highshads back nd hitc..wih lxu{:uCC
triming f fr, gld r cotrasingcolo1 /
1 .'l::J:".r ,.::., J. .w:Jf::::! ; N?,.~a:."1{t/
j r-i: ::?:ii};:{i:$:{ iiir' i'i:"; "'r
:i:_iii::r:ri~i{}';:i :i:i:! ::i:iYi. jii::i~f :r t~l~i :;:j:i ::F: 'ii: -, ?/iii:~: ::::?::."." i"
.-,,"?}iC; : Y:% ' siL'~~::iF:-2j j i;;~~$:?i ii:ii:+j ;: :lrr " / :>{:iCi:i. 1

I

WUHO
is this
AIOMA T\

.-
,.. ,:
ri R,
f
,
'.' y
...,. -.

FIRST PRIZE
A Stunning Large Screen G liCd a1
Television Set with full 13 Channel
coverage and Direct-View 10" Tube.
This hiandsom e szegoes to the
group entering the most ballots dur-
ing entire contest.

SECOND PRIZE
A Beautiful dM a1 Auto-
matic Radio-Phonograph Console
with Miracle Tone Arm. Plays
both 45-minute and standard
records-for Group with second
highest number of ballots entered.

THIRD PRIZE
.T H RDttZ Su4 Console R adio
Phonograph with Miracle Tone
Arm. Plays up to twelve records.
Changes records in 3 seconds
- for Group with third highest
number of ballots entered.

FOR COMPLETE PARROT RESTAURANT
ALEXANDERDRG
INFORMATION SEE CAMPUS DRUGS
BULLETINS AT: WIKEL'S DRUGS

ANNOUNCING! LAST WEEK'S WINNERS
Winners of Philip Morris Cigarettes

I

GEORGE ALLEN
NANCY C. BOONE

PHIL ANDERSON
DAVID BRADBURY

DAVID R. BACK
"BRANDY"

Philip Morris -cor-cast Winners Continued on Pa---5

I I

91

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan