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November 18, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG1 I

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1~ir 177CT A itnAT A

WAR AFF ECTS THINKING:
German Physicist Sees Sobered U.S.

World War II has had a sober-
ing effect on the American peo-
ple's thinking, according to Nobel
Prize-winning physicist Max Von
Laue, who addressed a University
audience yesterday.
Von Laue, who visited the Unit-
ed States before the war in 1930
and again in 1935, said that the
three and a half years of World
War I made Americans much
more serious intellectually.
, , , *

been renewing his acquaintance
with Americans and American life
for the past two months at Prince-
ton University. He is lecturing at
the Institute for Advanced Studies
there.

"Thermodynamics of
conductivity" was Von
topic yesterday.

Super-
Laue's

I

THE GERMAN physicist

has'

In layman's terms, it is study of
the fact the substances which or-
dinarily don't conduct electricity,

Maintenance To Be Discussed

like lead, have a very high con-
ductivity at very low temperatures.
THESE STUDIES have no in-
dustrial applications as yet, al-
though they may at some future
time, the physicist reported.
Von Laue won his Nobel prize
in 1914 in the field of crystal
structure.
He devised a method of meas-
uring X-ray wave lengths, using a
salt crystal which spreads out the
rays in definite patterns.
Gridde rs Invited
To Football 'Bust'
The Wolverine football squad
and representatives of all Wash-
tenaw County high school grid
teams have been invited to the
annual football "bust" sponsored
by the University of Michigan
Club of Ann Arbor.
The "bust" is scheduled for 6:30
p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 30, at the Un-
ion.

Brown Talk
Tickets To Go
On SaleToday
Today is the day when all the-
atre fans can purchase their tick-
ets to John Mason Brown's lec-
ture.
They will go on sale at the Hill
Auditorium box office.'
*~ * * .
BROWN, acclaimed as one of
the wittiest lecturers in the coun-
try, will deliver his lecture "Broad-
way in Review," at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
Ever since he became drama
critic for the Theatre Arts
Monthly, Brown has been a
prominent literary figure around
Manhattan.
He has chalked up to his credit
an enviable record of "first nights"
clue to his 14 year stint as drama
critic on the New York World
Telegram.
NOW, AS THE associate editor
of the Saturday Review of Liter-
ature, Brown has an inside picture
of the Broadway scene.
He has always had an urge to act
and has channelled his talents
into the lecturing field. He has
written numerous books on his
lecturing experiences, most of a
humorous nature.

Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
Club Organization-Meeting to
organize an undergraduate student
physics club, 4 p.m., Randall Lab-
oratory, Physics Building. All
physics concentrates with junior
or senior standing are eligible for
membership.
AVC-7:30 p.m., Union.
At' the State-"Man-Eaters of
Kumaan."
At the Michigan - "Hollow Tri-
umph."
EVENTS TOMORROW
La Sociedad Hispanica-Spanish
fiesta to honor Prof. E. A. Mer-
cado of the romance languages
department, former director of La
Sociedad, 8 p.m., Rackham Assem-
bly Hall.
rettrn Proofs,
'Ensian Asks
Delivery of Senior pictures
by Christmas can be guaran-
teed only if the proofs are
turned in before noon Saturday
the 'Ensian business staff
warned yesterday.
Proofs may be handed in at
the Student Publications Build-
ing between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
today and tomorrow, and be-
tween 9 a.m. and noon Satur-
day.

ThTJMSDAT, NOVE1MBER 18, 1948
GAY CABALLEROS:
Four 'U' Students Recall
Summer of Spanish -Study
By HERB ROVNER
With mid-term doldrums and wintry winds upon them, four
University students are looking back longingly to carefree days south
of the border last summer.
Sally Henry, '49, Dorothy Harris, '49, Elizabeth Iden, '49, and
John Ricardo, '48, winners of $100 scholarships for study at National
University in Mexico City were treated to a summer of Latin hos-
pitality.

THE QUARTET, who were awarded scholarships on basis of
activity and interest in La Sociedad Hispanica talked, ate and learned
Spanish all summer long.

:

"Ease of Maintenance" will be
the topic discussed at the local
American Ordnance Association
meeting, at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
301 West Engineering Annex.
Col. William A. Call, U.S. Army
Ordnance Department, will give
practical illustrations to show
campus engineers and production
men :how maintenance of equip-
ment may be simplified. He will
show how the strain of modernS

war on home production can be
eased by keeping combat equip-
ment operating.
Well qualified on the subject-
he recently headed a special study
of maintenance at Fort Knox, Ky.
Col. Call has had experience in the
field and in ordnance's industrial
plants. He is now taking his doc-
torate at the University.
The meeting will be open to all
members and their guests.

Living
they spoke
breakfast.
with quite

in private homes as they did, about the only time
English was when they requested "corn flakes" for
It seems there's no corresponding Spanish phrase
the same flavtr

o~~>r

DEPRESSED SIGHTSEER-_
Robert hlauptmann, 18, is glum
as he sits on the steps of park
police headquarters, at Wash-
ington, D.C., a sightseer from
Alaska without luggage or
money. Robert told police that
on arriving in Washington to
see the capital three men offered
to show him around in a private
car. After touring a few points
he said the men relieved him of
$344 and his luggage. Robert
planned to wire his father,

At, the University, they studied Mexican literature, culture,
and the economic and social problems of the country.
"THERE WERE lots of bolts and if you handed in a paper on
time, the prof was really surprised," Miss Henry said.
"But Mexico's progress in her educational facilities is really
wonderful," Miss Harris said.
"Schools are now being built all over the country by the govern-
ment. There is an intense interest in improving the standards of
education."
All three girls admitted that Mexican men are far more romantic
than Americans. "They are always singing and frequently send poetry
to you," Miss Henry said.
"In fact, just before leaving Mexico City, we were serenaded
by a group of handsome caballeros."

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