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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9 9 A

TIIIF MIC14ICA TlAlfi.V

AtA RL A I4. ~i 11U k L.I.J 1[L'4.1. ui

t' lw1a Y, NmyV E BE A1 , MRJ

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Thor Johnson Will Conduct
Cincinnati Symphony Here
Ann Arbor music-lovers are Koussevitsky. He has also direct-
throwing out the welcome mat ed the Berkshire Orchestra and
for the Cincinnati Symphony starred as great conductor of the
which will be conducted by for- Ne Ys Pheaharonicr osthn.
T-_ i__ -, New York Philharmonic. Boston,

I _

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;

mer University facultyman Thor
Johnson in its concert at 8:30
frm. Monday in Hill Auditorium..
Johnson, the only American-
born conductor of a major sym-
phony, has astonished the music
world by his rapid promotion to
his present post while in his early
thirties.
STILL RETAINED as guest con-
ductor for the Choral Union May
Festivals, Johnson trained for his
present position under Serg

Chicago and Philadelphia orches-
tras.
Included in the symphony's
local appearance will be "Aca-
demic Festival" Overture, by
Brahms; Mozart's Symphony
No. 35, "Haffner"; and "Job," a
masque for dancing, by Vaughan
Williams.
The second half of the program
vill feature Alfvan's "Midsummer
ligil" and the Suite from "Der
_"osenkavalier," by Strauss.

'U Advisory
Office Opens
For Pre-Meds
New Service Covers
Dejntal Students Also
The new advisory office for stu-
dents concentrating in pre-profes-
sional medical studies is now lo-
cated in Rm. 210, University Hall,
according to Prof. A. H. Stockard,
pre-professional advisor.
Prof. Stockard urged all pre-
medical, and pre-dental students.
and those wishing to concentrate
in these programs to call Ext.
2530 for an appointment.
BY SECURING an early ap-
pointment, Prof. Stockard said,
students will be able to obtain ad-
vice without waiting in line.
Ile also asked all pre-medical,
pre-dental, and other pre-pro-
fessional students in the health
sciences, regardless of their field
of concentration, who wish rec -
ommendations for admissions to
such professional schools also
to telephone Ext. 2530 for an
interview.
These students may fill out re-
quests for recommendations at
the office. This procedure will re-
lieve pressure on both students and
faculty members asked for rec-
ommendations, according to Prof.
Stockard.
He added that in this way pro-
fessional schools will be provided
with a concise, comprehensive
evaluation of the applicant.

I
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Weekly Job
Conferences
To Be Held
Enployers To
Be Represented
Dr. Luther T. Purdom, director
of the Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information has
announced the first in the series
of weekly occupation information
conferences will be held at 4:10
p.m. Wednesday in Rm. 231 Angell
Hall.
The weekly conferences will in-
clude fifteen minute talks by two
men representing diverse groups
of manufacturers, businessmen
and the professions.
TOPICS COVERED will be op-
portunities and positions in their
respective fields. After the speak-
ers, the meeting will be thrown
open for discussion and questions
from students.
Meetings will last until 5
p.m.
J. M. Herrman, manager of J.
C. Penney Co. of Jackson, and
Charles Olmsted, industrial rela-
tions director of the Great Lakes
Steel Co., of Ecorse, will be the
speakers at this week's session.
THE CONFERENCES we're held
last year, and are planned to con-
tinue throughout the year.
Notices placed on University
bulletin boards will inform stu-
dents of speakers and time for
each conference.

Dramatize Coll
On 'Campus Q
Weather-beaten old Barbour
Gym will come to life tomorrow
morning.
The ancient gym will tell the
story of how the Women's Ath-
letic Association has gradually
taken over the activities within
its walls over the years, in a fan-
tasy presented on "Campus Quar-
ter" tomorrow at 9:45 a.m. over

ege Activities
uarter' Show
In addition a sketch of the way
in which various campus activities
such as Lantern Night and J-Hop
have changed over the years will
also be featured on the program.
Produced as a publicity outlet
for the League and the Union, the
program is under the direction of
Al Nadeau. The script was written
by Barbara Barnes, and Stan
Johnson will do the announcing.

11 0 - - . !

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11

I - '.(i

THE NEW DATE DRESS

I~f~t u~ A'(ee 461p
1204 South University Avenue
.. serving . .
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
Closed Sundays

IS HERE!

Crepes -: in pastels - and Dressy Wools
TAFFETAS AND VELVETEENS
The Dressy Suit in all shades
with the smart new blouse.
A COMPLETE LINE OF 'SKIRTS
just arrived in new shades.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT VICTIM-James Delaney, 36 (top picture)
twists with pain on a Pittsburgh, Pa. sidewalk after a runaway tow
truck wheel leaped a boulevard curb and struck him. Seconds
later, passing motorists (bottom picture) rush to his side with a
first aid kit. A traffic policeman later took over and had the
injured man rushed to a hospital.

The Martha Barrett

Shop
erly "Mimi"

345 MAYNARD STREET

Form

p1- --- l~I

,YOU CAN STILL BE A WI NNER-
GET INTO THE PHILIP MORRIS
SCORECAST CONTEST NOWT

'q'

.Scorecast on
MICHIGAN vs. INDIANA
PENN vs. ARMY_
U.C.LA. vs. OREGON

$pa ,% ~*i~ Sr&Ws 'aoa
HERE'S WHAT YOU WIN FOR YOURSELF:
HERE'S WHAT YOU CAN WIN FOR YOUR LIVING GROUP OR CLUB!

Detroit Awaits
Settlement of
Hospital Strike
Ann Arbor Hospitals
Free from Trouble
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-A CIO union asked
state intervention in its wage dis-
pute with Grace Hospital while
AFL strikers reinforced their pic-
ket lines around neighboring Har-
per Hospital.
Leaders of the CIO's United
Public Workers said they had en-
gaged in "fruitless" negotiations
with Grace officials for a month.
But Yale Stuart, president of the
Detroit joint board of the UPW,
said "neither a strike nor a slow-
down" would be attempted.
TIE UPW, which claims to rep-
resent three-fourths of Grace's
non-professional workers, is de-
manding a flat $50-a-month in-
crease and revisions in working
conditions. Such employes now
earn $O to $130 a month.
There was no indication of
similar trouble occurring at Ann
Arbor hospitals.
University Hospital officials said
that there have been "no indica-
tions o employes dissatisfaction,
and they are not unionized."
HIGHER SALARIES and better
employe facilities in Ann Arbor
were given as reasons for lack of
difficulties with personnel.
St. Joseph's hospital officials
considered their establishment too
smali a unit to encounter labor
troubles
They [co reported that uone of
their employes are union members
and that most have been with
them a long time.
NINE OUTO F TEN
COME BACK AGAIN
to
"DINE
with the
ORMSBYS"
On he Village Square
in Dexer
FINE
ROME-COOKED
DINNERS
AT PRICES THAT
VOU ARE HAPPY
10 PAY
pet Daily 'til 7:30
Closed Sunday
BY iDUNCAN HuNES

Weekdays
8:00 A.M. § :00 RP.

Saturdays
8:00: A.M. - 6:30 P.M.

OUR WIDE-OPEN DOORS
WELCOME YOU
Drive throtgh and order your beer
303 NORTH FIFTH AVENUE

Call for Appointments
XEaunda na 4
Haf-our laundry
510 E. Williams Phone 5540

Doesn't Hurt
KOKOMO, Ind.-Only 23 per
cent of the nation's populatiorn
contributed to the Community
Chest in 1942.

a X.3o x' ''b ^"z. r r ,ss k.. ^
r r - § n,! i.,..u- 'a Y

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EASE WASH DAY
WORK!
Our Drying Facilities have been
expanded so that your wash can
be taken care of immediately.
Each load dries in 5 MINUTES.
25c per Washer Load

7 7A
N
3 <'
/ / Y~

QUALITY BLUE DENIM

women S

leans

79

I

FIRST PRIZE
A Stunning Large Screen c fdnit4al'
Television Set with full 13 Channel
coverage and Direct-View 10" Tube.
This handsome prize goes to the
Group entering the most ballots dur-
ing entire contest.

SECOND PRIZE THIRD PRIZE

A Beautiful OI1dsta1l Auto-
matic Radio-Phonograph Console
with Miracle Tone Arm. Plays
both 45-minute and standard
records-for Group with second
highest number of ballots entered.

OI/7Zrt C oin sole Radio
Phonograph with Miracle Tone
Arm. Plays up to twelve records.
Changes records in 3 seconds
- for Group with third high(*t
number of ballots entered.

FOR COMPLETE PARROT RE STAURANT
INFORMATION SEE ALEXANDR DRUGS
INFORATIO SEECAMPUS DRUGI
BULLETINS AT: WIKEL'S DRUGS
ANNOUNCINGI LAST W EEK'S WINNERS!
Watch this paper for announcement of this week's winners.

Just the jeans you'll want for all-around sports
wear. Made of sturdy blue denim with attractive
white stitching around the pockets. There are four
roomy pockets. And best of all they're sanforized
so they won't shrink over 1%. They'll give you a
comfortable, smart-looking fit, because they were
designed particularly for women. At this unusual
price they'll go fast, so hurry in for yours soon.
An excellent buy! Available in even waist sizes,
22.44

V - U

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