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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE MGTTT

I T N MI CIGAN DA I Y

-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, P9.19

PAGE ----------- ....NOVE BER...... ..

STUFFED-SHIRTS:
Michigani Men Mob Local
T ailors To Rent Tuxedos

By FRAN IVICK
The swollen Ann Arbor rental
Income is rising even higher-and
'all because Michigan men want
to be stuffed shirts.
Not satisfied with their usual
prim business suits, campus males
have started their annual run on
rented tuxedos, driven by the so-
cial pressure of formal dances.
TUX TENANTS have found lo-
cal tailors fully prepared, with
suits from their own store or tie-
ups with Detroit clothing con-
cerns, through which tuxedos may
be rented for five or six dollars.
Unlike the harried students,
Ann Arbor merchants take the
holiday rush in their stride. One
South U. clothier, who rents
tuxes directly from his store,
Fraternity 'Adopts'
Boy from Naples
Eight year old Giuseppe Gusta-
ferro, formerly of Naples, has been
"adopted" by Delta Upsilon frater-
nity under the Foster Parents'
Plan for War Children.
Giuseppe, whose parents died in
the Naples bombardment, is now
living with his two sisters in a
settlement near there. The boy will
receive $15 a month for a min-
imum of a year from the frater-
nity.

even goes so far as to help the
boys dress.
"Lots of the men still don't
know how to tie bow ties," he said,
"so I have them come over to my
store just before they call for
Friday night dates, and I fix their
ties. After two or three tries, they
pick up the knack themselves."
TUXES STAND UP through a
minimum twelve wearings, tailors
say. The greatest wear doesn't
come from the men, but through
the altering done on the suit to
make it fit each renter.
Ann Arbor ranks among the
lowest-priced cities in the Unit-
ed States, so far as tux rentals
are concerned, and in some lo-
cal stores a student can rent a
shirt, tie and studs along with
the suit.
Aside from alterations and
friendly advice, the work of local
"tux-lords" doesn't begin until
the suit is returned. Then they
clean out the pockets, put the tux
through a thorough cleaning, and
remind the renters of any person-
al articles left in the jacket.
"We find compacts, cigarette
cases and programs-that's to be
expected," one tailor said. "But
the biggest surprise is the number
of coats with No-Nods in the
pockets. Makes me wonder what
kind of girl they dated."

New Directory
Says 'U' Hall
No Empty
Faculty Still Holds
Own inAngell Hall
You'll find most of the Univer-
sity's offices are now in the new
Administration Building-if you
look them up in the new faculty
directory which was issued last
week.
Actually none of the offices
have moved into the modernistic
orange structure yet, although oc-
cupation of the building is ex-
pected to begin sometime this
month.
S* *
MOST OF AGING University
Hall and parts of South Wing and
Angell Hall are empty now, ac-
cording to the red-bound direc-
tory. Only the Germanic Lan-
guages Office, and the offices of
Shirley Smith, vice - president
emeritus and Joseph Bursley, dean
emeritus of students retain list-
ings in old U Hall.
Office of Student Affairs,
Business Offices, Registrar's Of-
fice, Dean of Students Walters
and Dean of Women Lloyd are
all housed in the first floor of
the five-story building - the,
directory says.
President Alexander Ruthven,
other University officers and the
Board of Regents will have quc#-
ters on the second floor, the di-
rectory reveals. The presidential
office number is to be 2522.
WUOM, the University's FM ra-
dio station, is listed as having its
studios and offices in the lofty
fifth-floor of the building,
STUDENTS
Make a good income in your
spare time. Sell a nationally-
advertised product manufactured
in Michigan. Liberal commission.
WRITE
ZEPHYR VENT. AWNING CO.
47-49 1th St., Battle Creek

By MARY STEIN
Workers of today should spend
more time having fun, less time at
work and should switch jobs fre-
quently, according to Dr. Georges
Friedman, French sociologist.
Dr. Friedman, who spoke at
Rackham Amphitheatre yesterday,
said that "leisure is the great
problems of today." Workers
should enjoy more of it, he de-
clared.
S * *
WORKING HOURS should be
further shortened, he said. And in-
dustrial workers who stick to one
assembly-line job too long will
harm their personalities, he de-
clared.
They begin to work uncon-
sciously-"with the reflexes, not
the brains." They know what's
going on only in their own mi-
Sound trucks
Called Danger
Soundtrudks were termed "a
danger and a distraction to both
pedestrians and other vehicles,"
by Assistant City Attorney Louis
C. Andrews Jr. in a brief upholding
the constitutionality of Ann Ar-
bor's anti-noise law.
University students Max Dean
and John Houston are being tried
for violation of the law. The two
were arrested when they used a
soundtruck in a Progressive regis-
tration-campaign drive.
Defending attorneys Ernest
Goodman and John Rae main-
tained in their brief, filed earlier,
that the local law violates a recent
Supreme Court decision which de-
clared a similar ordinance in Lock-
port, N.X. unconstitutional.
Judge Jay H. Payne, with whom
the briefs were filed, has not yet
indicated when he will deliver his
decision.

Get Set for Winter.. .
Men's ALL RUBBER

Workers Should Switch Jobs,
Enjoy Life, Claims Sociologist.

croscopic bit of the production
line.
Such workers even get so they
don't want to trade jobs. But
workers should not be allowed to
stick to one humdrum task, Dr.
Friedman, professor at the Sor-
bonne in Paris, said.
"I AM NOT asking for a return
to the Golden Age of the past
when machines played no part in
man's life," he declared.
But he did advocate "making
machines to fit the worker."
They should be built for the la-
borer, not vice versa, he said.
Whether a worker is happy or
not in his work depends on how
industrial plants are run, he said.
He will do a better job if labor-
management relations in his plant
are good.
IF HIS morale is high he will
strike less and produce more.
Workers in France have gotten
away entirely from management
problem in a few cases. "Whole
industries in France are run by
the workers themselves- and suc-
cessfully," Dr. Friedman said.
The machine age has created
new situations which affect man
profoundly, he emphasized. He
mustacconodate himself to
the mechanical environment
which now almost completely
surrounds him.
Even his leisure time is mechan-
ized, he said. Movies, radio and
television prove that the machine
controls even the off-work mo-
ments of man's life.
People in the smallest hamlets
and the largest cities enjoy the
same kinds of relaxation, he said.
Teaching Forum
"Planning a Teaching Career"
will be the subject of a public
forum sponsored by Phi Mu Alpha
Sinfonia music fraternity, to 7e
held 8:30 p.m. today in Rackham
assembly hall.
Dr. Clyde Vroman, acOdemic
counselor of the School of Music
will head the six-member panel
in a discussion of requirements in
special teaching fields. After-
wards, the meeting will be thrown
open to the audience.
Tough Homesteads
PUMPKIN CENTER, S.D.-The
average American farm house last
65 years.
SOI~D COLO R
~ KNIT
\ STYLED FOR
COLLEGE MEN
No college mn's wardrobe
complete without several.
a beautifully knitted of world
a Satisfaction guaranteed or
money cheerflly refunded.
ONL s.5 EACN
'regular $2.00 voWO
ecili3 or$3 .2.5
Postage prepaid

H I N E S E D E M 0 N S T R A T E - "Confucius" presides over demonstration In Shanghai
on China's independence day against "tigers"--the Chinese term for speculators and hoarders.

ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUCUE

Zipper
GALOSH ES

Sale Price

3 88

Ankle Height
$4 88
Regular Height

aa
~,'*

FLOWERS IN HER HAIR
featured at the
Chelsea Flower Shop
Carnations, Gardenias, Roses, Orchids - take your
pick. Corsages for the hair or wrist. Put your
order in today and surprise your date for Pan-Hel
Bal;
THE CHELSEA FLOWER SHOP
203 East Liberty . . . Call 2-5616

.4
C..
:.
* *

FIRST QUALITY RUBBERS
Get Your Size Now! Stock Limited
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington Open Evenings 'til 7 P.M.

I C E P E R F O R M E R S - Paul Preston swings his wife; Mickee, as the novelty acrobatic ice-
skating team puts on act at a theatre in New York.-Their home is -at Marietta, Pa.

PHOTO
OFFICIAL RULES:

1949

ICHIGANENSIAN

i
I
t_

Harvel Co., Dept. No. 3
P. 0. Box 1342, Baltimorm 3, Md.
Please send memknit ties at $1.15
each or 3 for $3.25, potage prepaid.
Maroon jaNavy blue 1fjBlack LQi
Send to......... .................. $
Address ..............................
City...............:....State..
- -

(Please insert number of ties in each box)

I

CO

TEST

"Give me all 57 Dr. Grabow
Pre-Sm-oked Pipes that are
featured in LIFE Magazine"

1.
2.
3.

Any picture pertaining to Michigan campus
life today.
All purchasers of the 1949 Michiganensian
are eligible.
Mail or bring all pictures to the Michigan-
ensian Business Office, Student Publica-

tions Bldg., 420 Maynard St.

No Breaking In/
No Bite

V "IlLIN

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