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November 11, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-11

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TMMSDA*, NOVE-AME i 1-1, 1918

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TIfl3I~SDAY, NO~VI!~MRER -1-1, 1948

Majors

Ignore

costly

Talent

in

FROSH THESAURUS:
'M's' Effervescent Weber
Shapes VarsityMaterial

19 Minor League. Playe.-jrs
Drafted by Major Clubs
Detroit Drafts Grissom from Sacramento;
Cleveland Purchases Reich from Portland

By CAL KLYMAN
Hollywood could not possibly
have invented a finer version of
a rough n'ready football coach
than Wally Weber, mentor of
Michigan's future grid stars.
Even the most casual observer
can hardly keep from feeling the
inspiration Wally, through his vast
knowledge of football and human
nature imparts to his charges.
TO SAY THAT Weber has a
command of the English language
would be a gross understatement
and an injustice to this "walking
Thesaurus" who has practically
invented a branch of speech all his
own.
T hose who have heard his dis-
sertations on the lack of effec-
tiveness of a not too fleet-footed
end, "Son, you got two speeds,
slow and excruciatingly slow,"
COMPLETE
CO0L LISION
SERVICE
i

will undoubtedly support the
candidacy of this coach as one
of the most colorful characters
on Michigan's athletic staff.
Not many fans realize the im-
portance of Weber's job in the
building of future teams; upon his
stocky shoulders rests the task of
turning freshman hopefuls into
future grid stars.
To Weber befalls the job of ex-
posing frosh talent to the Mich-
igan system of play and instilling
in the players some of the tradi-
tion established by athletic greats
of the past.
IN CONSIDERING the success
of this method, the unconvinced
need only glance at the distin-
guished roster of Weber graduates;
a list that might easily be mis-
taken for a Michigan record of All
Americans.
All time stars such as Tom
Harmon and Tom Kuzma owe
their initial instruction in college
athletics to Weber. To bring the
list of Weber disciples up to date
we might include the amazing
sophomore combination of
Chuck Ortmann and Leo Ko-
ceski who only last year played
freshman ball.
A fullback on the 1925-1926
teams of the immortal Fielding
(Hurry-Up) Yost, he, along with
his teammates, Benny Oosterbaan
and Benny Friedman, aided Mich-
igan in winning two successive
conference championships.
AFTER GRADUATION Wally
further proved his talents by
coaching Benton, Harbor High
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WALLY WEBER
.. .frosh coach
School to twenty-seven wins in
thirty starts. In the vocabulary
that has come to be known as
"Weberism," "This is an impres-
sive impregnation of opposing
gladiators."
The year 1931 saw Wally re-
turn to his alma-mater as back-
field coach for a team that
copped the conference cham-
pionship for three consecutive
years. After serving several years
in that capacity, he was promot-
ed to the position which he now
holds.
Due to his great rhetoric ability,
Weber's time off the playing field
is dedicated to after dinner
speeches and public addresses for
which he is much in demand. His
sense of humor and infinite source
of material have brought him
speaking invitations from all over
the United States.
Whether Wally Weber is thought
of in the capacity of athletic men-
tor, orator, philosopher, or hu-
morist, he will always be regarded
as a "swell guy," truly a coach's
coach.

CINCINNArfl1-(")-Those tal-
ent-tagged kids known as bonus
players were ignored today as the
Major Baseball Leagues staged
their annual draft.
Although the minors are studded
with 270 youngsters who were good
enough to get $6,000 or more for
penning their names to contracts,
not one was considered ready ior
a big league trial.
Instead, the Major moguls
hand-picked 19 players from the
high minors at a cost of $182,-
500 as they sought experienced
talent to plug their leaky line-
ups for the 1949 flag chase.
Last year 13 clubs drafted 29
players costing $275,000.
About 5,400 players from 58
leagues were eligible to receive
the Major League call, but the
top took 16 from the Triple-A
circuits - six from the Interna-
tional and five each from the Pa-
cific Coast and American Associa-
tion-two from the Double-A
Southern Association, and one
from the Double-A Texas League.
Chicago's White Sox, with out-
going General Manager Leslie
O'Connor and incoming General
Manager Frank Lane doing the
picking, were the heavy buyers
as they put $30,000 on the line
for a pitcher, catcher and in-
fielder.
The two 1948 pennant winners
went for outfielders, Boston's
Braves getting two and Cleveland's
World Champions one. The Braves
took Don Thompson, 24-year-old
southpaw who hit .285 in 121
games for Columbus, and Charley
Gilbert of Nashville.
Here are the draft selections,
and what they did in 1948:
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CHICAGO: Dwain Sloat, left-
handed pitcher, won 10 lost 8 for
St. Paul; James Kirby, right-
handed batting outfielder, who hit
.286 in 152 games for Shreveport.
* * *
CINCINNATI: Homer E. How-
ell, catcher with San Francisco,
batted .292; John S. Pramesa,
catcher, batted .284 for Jersey
City.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA: Bob Blattner,
former New York Giant, batted
.275 in 110 games for Jersey City,
a third baseman; Ken Silvestri,
Newark catcher, hit .201 in 129
games.

ST. LOUIS: Edward Sauer, out-
fielder, hit .305 for Los Angeles.
AMERICAN LEAGUE'
CHICAGO: Matthew Surkont,
right-handed pitcher who won 15,
lost 11 for Rochester; Gene Mark-
land, infielder who hit .280 in 147
games for Milwaukee; Don Wheel-
er, catcher who hit .304 in 139
games for Montreal.
ST. LOUIS: Robert Malloy,
pitcher, won 21, lost seven for
Indianapolis; Irving Medlinger,
left handed pitcher, won 3 lost 3
for St. Louis, won 10 lost 5 for
Birmingham and Scranton.
DETROIT: Marvin Grissom,
pitcher, won 11 lost 7 for Sacra-
mento.
PHILADELPHIA: Tom Davis,
shortstop, hit .252 for Hollywood;
Jim Wilson, pitcher, won seven
games, lost 13 for Toledo.
CLEVELAND: Herman Reich,
right-handed outfielder, batted
.324 for Portland.

Draft
Circus Catch
Gets Hoitsina
AP Selection
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - ()-
Lou Hoitsma raised up from his
end position and just sort of
grinned. The 6-foot, 2-inch Wil-
liam and Mary flankman was
every inch a pleased football play-
er.
Hoitsma had just been told he'd
been selected today as the line-
man of the week in the Associated
Press poll. That honor was his
for a brilliant performance in
William and Mary's surprising 7-7
tie last Saturday with North Car-
olina.
Asked about his circus catch of
a 21-yard touchdown pass from
tailback Tommy Korczowski, Hoit-
sma said he "didn't know what
was going on from the time the
play started until they were
putting the score on the score-
board."
All men interested in the or-
ganization of campus ice hockey
teams are requested to report
at 4:30 today to the I-M Build-
ing.

Pierce Sent to Chicago
In Deal for Vet Catcher

DETROIT - (AP) - The Detroit
Tigers today traded Billy Pierce,
young southpaw pitcher, to the
Chicago White Sox for catcher
Aaron Robinson, former New York
Yankee backstopper.
Announcing the straight swap
here, a Tiger spokesman said the
deal was closed during the draft
meeting at Cincinnati in discus-
sions between Billy Evans, De-
troit general manager, and Frank
Lane, general manager of the Sox.
PIERCE, 21-year-old Detroit
sandlot product, won 14 games
and lost only eight for the Tigers'
Buffalo farm club in the Inter-

national League in 1947 but worked
only 55 innings here last season,
winning three games and losing
none. He struck out 36 batsmen
and walked 51.
The Tigers figure the 32-year-
old Robinson can bolster a sagging
Detroit catching staff and at the
same time produce an occasional
extra-base hit shooting at Briggs
Stadium's moderately short right
field wall.
* * *
ROBINSON,4a lefthanded hit-
ter, batted .249 and hit eight
homers last year for the Sox after
going to Chicago from the Yanks
in a deal for pitcher Ed Lopat.

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Tickets on sale at OLYMPIA, Tuller Hotel Cigar Stand, and Statler and
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NO INTOXICATING LIQUORS SOLD OR PERMITTED ON PREMISES

CHRISTMAS SCENES;I
to spread joy and happiness
to your friends and family
Order your Christmas Cards
NOW!
We have a wide selection at a
variety of prices.
RAMSAY-CANFIELD
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Hogan Named
As Top Golfer

VI

Grant Alexander says: "You
can still get our complete
paint job for only $69.50."
BODY AND FENDER
WORK
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WELDING of Any Kind
All Work Guaranteed
Knol Erwin
YOUR HUDSON DEALER

CHICAGO - (/P)-Ben Hogan,
who has earned $32,112 in the
Professional Golfers' Association
Tournament this year, picked up
another honor today when he was
named "golfer of the year" in a
poll conducted by the PGA.
The Texan was elected to the
honor by the press and radio of
the United States in a practically
unanimous vote, George Schneiter,
chairman of the PGA Tournament
Committee, said.

D. S. Parker, quip-maker to the elite,
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- a tragedy in one issue -

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STO N
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"The publications season opened last night with
a shudder. The 40 pages that shocked the world (and
the dean's office) broke upon the opening-night audi-
ence with all the mad passion of a sleeping three-toed
sloth. Strong men wept at the fiery magnificence of
Gargoyle's "Table of Contents," and cried aloud at the
emasculated brilliance of what Garg promoters laugh-
ingly called "Picture of Third Floor Shower Room."
Delicate ladies reached for their smelling salts (attrib-
uting the lingering odor to the wrong source), and
feared for their money-belts as the powerful urge of
the new Gargoyle became obvious. The new Gargoyle,
half-literary, half-humorous, and half- . . . well, the
new Gargoyle is a delight to behold, a pleasure to own,
and easily disposed of the next morning."
-George Bernard Fink
"I was held enthralled for the better part of a day
-until I got that ' magazine t jc!d from my
z_ -"-Snooks Atkinson, News
"The inside front and back covers are nearly
blank. This is a cheering note."
-Ascot Bibbs, Sun

"The open season on readers commenced with a
fanfare of trumpets and a rolling of customers."
-Nicholas Plato, Kyrix
"The New Gargoyle may be likened to Shake-
speare, Marlowe, Kidd, Goethe, and Grillparzer-it's
dead."
-Harry Levine, Schenectady (N.Y.) Button
"The Student Publications mountain has labored
and brought forth a roose."
-Jack London, Nome Express
"Last night, as it must to all men, death came
too."
"I apologize to the University of Michigan."
-Meyer Schulz, Daily Freitag
"Thank God we're not alone."
-Elmo Roper
"There's something in the air." -FCC

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