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September 22, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE, SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

mommommmm

POSITIONS OPEN:
Union Urges Eligible Men
To Attend StaffMeeting
Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their

Union.
The Michigan Union has announced a
htld Sept. 23, at 7:30 p.m., in Room 3B in

staff tryout meeting to bej
the Union.

ELIGIBLE SECOND SEMESTER freshmen and sophomores may
apply for positions on all Union committees: Social, House, Publicity,
Campus Affairs, Student Relations, and Planning and Personnel.
Union President Bob Holland and Secretary Keith Jordan
will be on hand to greet staff aspirants and to preside at the
meeting. Committee chairmen will also be present to describe the
functions and activities of their respective groups.
Publicity Cochairman Dick Hitt, urged all interested men to
attend the meeting "Although interests and talents are greatly varied,
the Union is one place where you can apply all your abilities and
increase your interest in various fields," he pointed out.
* * * *
TYPICAL OF THE FUNCTIONS of the Social Committee is the
staging of dances and parties.
The House Committee arranges for the appearances of out-
standing figures in such sports as pool, conducts bridge tourna-
ments, resells football tickets, and puts up lobby displays.
The Publicity Committee uses posters, and works through the
Daily and the Union News to accomplish its objectives.
Personnel and Planning includes keeping records, outlining proj-
ects, and conducting staff meetings.
Coffee and doughnuts will be served at the meeting.
Welcome for Taylor Planned:

Borden Award
Presented to
Wyngaarden
Grand Rapids Doctor
Gets $500 Prize
The Borden undergraduate
award of $500 was presented to
Dr. James B. Wyngaarden, '48M,
Grand Rapids, during the 98th
opening ceremony of the medical
school.
The annual award, made pos-
sible by the Borden Foundation,
was given to Dr. Wyngaarden for
his "original and meritorious re-
search in the field of pharmaco-
logy.
Dr. Wyngaarden is serving his
internship at the Massachusetts
General Hospital in Boston.
Speakers at the ceremony in-
cluded Dr. Haven Emerson, a di-
rector of the Kellogg Foundation
of Battle Creek, and visiting lec-
turer to the public health school;
and Dr. Albert Furstenberg, dean
of the medical school.
Dr. Emerson asserted that medi-
cine is an instrument of social
progress, which should not be jeo-
pardized by what he termed ob-
vious incompetence of government.
Local health departments, he said,
should be considered the frame-
work of medical government.
Closing the ceremony, Dr. Fur-
stenberg pointed out that the Uni-
ted States has more doctors per
capita population than Britain,
Sweden, and Germany had before
the war.
He went on to say that the dif-
ficulty is not the number of phy-
sicians but the inadequacy of dis-
tribution and the utilization of
services. '

Marking the tenth anniversary
of the establishment of Interna-
tional Center, the annual fall se-
mester reception for hundreds of
newly arrived students from other
lands will take place at 7:30 p.m.
Monday in the ballroom of the
Michigan League.
The occasion will also mark the
fifteenth year since the appoint-
ment of the Counselor to Foreign
Students on campus.
THE PRINCIPAL ADDRESS
will be given by Dr. Francis J.
Colligan, Chief of the Division
of International Exchange of the
Last Chance
To Get X-Ray
New students who failed to re-
ceive chest x-rays should go to
Health Service for their examina-
tion as soon as possible, Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, Health Service
director, announced yesterday.
Students who have free time
during class hours should go di-
rectly to the second floor of Health
Service for examinations or ap-
pointments.
Those who will not be free dur-
ing class hours should arrange to
take the examination between 5
and 7 p.m., according to the fol-
lowing schedule:
Women: A-K, September 22, L-
Z, September 23. Men: A-E, Sep-
tember 24; F-L, September 27;
M-Short, September 28 and Shoup
to Z, September 29.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY:
International Center Presents
Tenth Anniversary Reception

Department of State. In a speech
that willbe broadcast, Dr. Colli-
gan is expected to make an im-
portant statement on the federal
government's policies in the field
of international exchange.
The program of the evening
will be preceeded by a dinner
with President Alexander G.
Ruthven and Foreign Student
Counselor Esson M. Gale as
hosts in honor of Dr. Colligan.
Invitations have been issued to
various cultural attaches of the
Washington embassies, consuls and
others concerned with intercul-
tural relations.
CONCURRENT with the recep-
tion will be an exhibit graphically
illustrating the far flung activities
of the University's international
orientation organ. Among these
will be a large colored map of the
world with lines from every corner
converging upon Ann Arbor.
A huge multi-colored disc will
picture in proportionate seg-
ments the many different serv-
ices and activities for which the
center is responsible.
Another part of the decoration:
includes a miniature replica of In-
ternational Center itself.
Movies of the second annual
Foreign Student Pacific Coast
tour will be shown.
President Ruthven will review'
the University's ten-year foreigr
educational program and specia'
guests will be presented.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 1948
IFC Reports
Rushees Rush
InRegistration
One hundred eighty-seven men
registered with the IFC on the
first day of a three-day regis-
tration period.
Jim Ely, IFC Rushing Chair-
man, urged those who intend to
sign up for rushing to come in
early to avoid a last minute stam-
pede of the IFC office. Rushing
will continue this afternoon and
Thursday from 3 to 5 p.m. on the
third floor of the Michigan Un-
ion.
A special meeting of all rushees 1
will be held at 7:15 p.m., Thurs-
day in the Michigan Union Ball-
room. Assistant Dieqn of Stu_,
dents Rea will speak and the SAE
Glee Club, last year's IFC Sing
winners, willsing.
The purpose of the meeting is
to insure that the rushee under-
stands the rushing rules, accord
ing to Jake Jacobson of the IFC.
Bus. Ad. Reaches
Peak Enrollment
With enrollment figures reach
ing the highest peak in its his-
tory, the Business Administration
School now accommodates over 1,-
200 students.
The record registration is at-
tributed in part to the greater
emphasis placed upon a business
career in the past few years.
Not only growing in num-
bers, the Business Administration
School has also grown in scope
and size since 1942. At that date
the school was merely for gra-
uates. Now it combines both
graduate and undergraduate cur-
riculums.

University students supporting
Wallace and Taylor are mobiliz-
ing to ring doorbells and meet
voters to publicize Sen. Glen Tay-
lor's arrival in Ann Arbor on
Thursday, according to Al Lip-
pett, temporary chairman of the
Wallace Progressives.
An expected fifty students arm-
ed with Wallace buttons and Pro-
gressive Party literature and leaf-
lets will cover the campus, the
town, 'and the gates of 'Kaiser-
Frazer as student door-to-door
campaigning gets under way. In

addition, a sound truck will be
used at Kaiser-Frazer and in Ann
Arbor Wednesday and Thursday
to publicize the event.
A motor cavalcade is being or-
ganized to accompany Sen. Tay-
lor to West Park, where he will
speak at 3 p.m. Others will have
an opportunity to hear him at the
Kaiser-Frazer gates at noon, or
at a luncheon sponsored by the
Women for Wallace, to be held at
12:30 in the Union, John Houston,
chairman of the Taylor Day com-
mittee, said yesterday.

MARSHALL AND BEVIN LEAVE THREE POWER TALK-Brit-
ain's Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin (left) shakes hands with U.S.
Secretary of State George C. Marshall in Paris as they leave
three-power talks over blockaded Berlin. The American, British
and French foreign ministers, in Paris for the third annual U.N.
General Assembly session which convened yesterday, got together
in the French Foreign Ministry.
Arthos Will Head Community
Chest Campatgn on Campus

I

This year's campus Community
Chest drive will be headed by John
Arthos of the University's Eng-
lish department, according to
Howard V. Walters, local Com-
munity Chest campaign chairman.,
The campus division of theI

t

Automobile Repair Service
Many Michigan students and faculty members
can attest to the satisfactory service at our garage.
We make repairs of any kind o any make of car.
OUR WORK IS GUARANTEED
KNOLL & ERWIN, Inc.
HUDSON DEALERS

Campus
Calendar
Roger Williams Guild - Fi
weekly "chat," 4:30-6 p.m., Gu
House, 502 E. Huron.
Michigan Christian Fellowsl
-Prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m. a
Bible study at 8 p.m., "Up
Room," Lane Hall.
NSA Open Meeting - 4 p.
Union.
AVC -- Group discussion, "T
GI on Campus-Three Years L
er." Nomination of delegates
national convention, 8 p.m., U
ion.

irst
ild
hip
ind
Derl

community fund drive is respon-
sible for solicitation of approxi-
majely 2,600 faculty and clerical
employees, and 1,600 maintenance
and construction personnel. This
year's goal of $158,600 for the Ann
Arbor area is 15 per cent over last
year's target.
THE NEW GOAL of the drive
was decided upon by the budget
committee after an all-summer
study of the needs of the fifteen
Red Feather agencies.
Upon acceptance of his ap-
pointment, Arthos said that he
hoped that the University com-
munity would contribute to the
drive as fully and generously as
it had in the past.

ENROLL
for SHORTHAND
and TYPING
We will arrange classes
to fit your schedule
ANN ARBOR
BUSINESS SCHOOL

No need to
SOCK THE FAMILY JEWELS
to get your watch repaired!
THE VETERAN WATCH REPAIR SERVICE will
clean your watch and install any needed parts for a
maxunum price of
THE COST MAY BE LESS depending on the needs of
your watch. If your watch is very old or any unusual
make, you will be given an estimate of cost of repair
work before work is begun.Ij
o CHRONOGRAPHS and CLOCKS REPAIRED
at new LOW PRICES
EIGHTEEN DAYS SERVICE OR LESS
ALL REPAIRS GUARANTEED
VETERAN WATCH REPAIR SERVICE "pick-up" stations
are located at:
a STATE DRUG COMPANY, Car. Packard and State St.
0 o WEST LODGE P.X., Willow Run Village.
g * "HERBERT," 1099 Conway Court, Willow Run Village.

907 N. Main St.

Phone 2-3275

'""""'"""

it

Are You Interested
in an Activity with

Last year, he continued, 2,654
m contributors provided 16 per cent
of the entire goal, and by doing
the so showed that the members of the
at- University are well aware of the
to vital functions that the Red
In- Feather agencies play in the wel-
fare of the community as a whole.
In Ann Arbor last year, 8,525
- residents were served directly by
the Red Feather agencies, accord-
ing to a Community Chest spokes-
man.
Of this number many were cam-
pus people who used such services
as the Perry Nursery School, which
takes care of children of working
mothers during the day, and the
Family Service, which gives pro-
fessional consultation on pesonal
and marital adjustment problems,
financial assistance, and planning
of budgets.
VIVIANE ROMANCE
A TA . i8:r. 30.,, .. Rm .
,S,1i,.s d by *,Irn #,gba, I eeoinn
FRI, SAT. 8:30 P.M.!
h. .d1

I A

330 Nichols Arcade

k

Phone 2-0330

Experience?

WEDNESDAY'S SPECIAL
at the
WOLVERINE
DEN
Roast Beef Sandwich
and
FrenchFries
50c
The Den is open for
Breakfast at 7 A.M.

In your country's service, yours is no ordinary
future. It's a new career for women,
recently established by your representatives
in Congress-that of permanent association
with the Regular Services.
American women won this recognition by their
distinguished service with the Armed Forces
in the emergency of war. Now they can support their
country in protecting the peace. If you're

w

Your college education is not complete if you have only studied books.
The Business Staff of THE MICHIGAN DAILY is interested in training
you for circulation, advertising, layout, selling, promotion, general office
procedure, accounting, and design. If you are a second semester freshman
or above and are scholastically eligible, come over to The Daily tomorrow,
September 23, at 4 P.M. Not only does The Daily offer you experience
with a future, but it also offers you experience on the country's leading
collegiate newspaper. The Daily is one of Ann Arbor's biggest businesses
and is completely run by students.

11

!' 'I

I

I

wondering how to put your college knowledge to work in a
world that needs so much ... and how to get the
job you want, the money and prestige you expect after four
years' intensive study, look for new fields in
the Women's Army Corps or Women in the Air Force.
No matter what your special interests, you'll find you
can put your education to work in the
U. S. Army or U. S. Air Force. .>.
Now your dream job is possible,

Plan to

Hold Your
DANCES &,
DINNERS

REMEMBERI

your future unlimited. Advance-

III

I

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