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November 06, 1948 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-06

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ISATURDAY, NOVEMER 6, 1948

TH E M ICHIGAN MAILY

PAGE THMEE

Wolverines Set To Sink Navy Via Air, Groun

dLanes

Jayvees Splash

to

Victory

Over

State'

Jackson, Bremer, Coutino Lead
Maize and Blue to Third Win

v

TO BATTLE THE BUCKEYES-Led by Capt. Don O'Connell, Jerry Burns, and Jim Costa the
Wolverine lightweights will take on Ohio State in their first home game at Ferry Field this morning.
The 150-pounders are seeking a come-back after their defeat at the hands of the Illini in order to
keep alive hopes for at least a tie for the Conference championship.
a a * * * *
LETS GO LIGHTWEIGHTS:
1-50's Face Buckeyes in Home Debut

By PRES HOLMES
Michigan's Jayvees sloshed to a
27-8 win over the Michigan State
"B" team, on a rainswept Ferry
Field gridiron yesterday afternoon.
It was the second time the Wol-
verines had handed their state
rivals a setback this season, and
left Coach Don Robinson's crew
with a record of three wins and
no defeats.
The Jayvees displayed a stel-
lar brand of football, especially
considering the weather and
condition of the field. Their of-
fense broke through for con-
sistent gains, Norm Jackson
playing an outstanding game at
fullback. Amato Contino was a
standout on the Wolverine de-
fense in backing up the line.
The Spartans were the first to
break into the scoring column in
the second quarter when Bill Jen-
nings was trapped in the Michigan
end zone. Michigan had been set
back to their three-yard line by
a tremendous quick-kick by Fred
Skink from his own 15. The Wol-
verines made a first down but
were set back to the 18-inch line
as a result of two penalties.
The lead was short lived, how-
ever, as the Jayvees struck back
minutes later. Jim Moorish took
the ball from Jackson on the State
35. He fumbled while still in the
backfield, but picked the ball up,
leaped above the line and floated
a jump-pass over the heads of
Michigan State's secondary to

George Sutherland who scampered
the remaining distance for the
score. Hal Pink converted and
Michigan was out in front to stay.
The rain which had let up in
the second quarter began to fall
harder and harder throughout the
second half.
A State punt from their own
two was partially blocked giving
the Wolverines the ball on the
15 early in the third quarter.
Moorish scored on the fourth
play from scrimmage, and Pink
again converted.
In the opening stages of the last
quarter Jennings scored on one of
the best executed plays of the
afternoon. The ball was handled
three times in the backfield and
the MSC defense was completely
fooled as they all headed for the
left sideline while Jennings was
out in the open on the opposite
side of the field. Pink made it
three for three and the Maize and
Blue held the long end of the 21-2
score.
MSC had the ball for one series
of plays after the kickoff and then
punted to Contino who was
stopped on the Michigan 40. Jim
Bremer reeled off a sixty-yard
sprint around left end to complete
the Wolveringe total. Jackson fum-
bled the pass from center as Pink
attempted to convert.
Fred Skink scored a consola-
tion touchdown for the Spartans
in the waning minutes of the game
on a 30-yard dash through tackle.

SPORTS
ROG GOELZ, Night Editor
MSC Ready
As Hilitoppers
Invade Lansing
EAST LANSING - (I)-An in-
jury-ridden Marquette squad ar-
rived here this afternoon to pre-
pare for the 18th annual renewal
of its traditional football rivalry
with Michigan State College Sat-,
urday.
"We know we'll be up against a
tough team," said Marquette coach
Frank Murray, "but we're going to
try to make a game of it."
Murray was unhappy because
he had to leave four of his varsity
men at home because of injuries.
Missing from the squad were
Don Cusack, starting center;
tackles, Bob Pfotenhauer and
Charles Zetter, and end Dick
Scherer.
Murray said the Hilltoppers
have been handicapped at prac-
tice this week by a steady drizzle
of rain, but added that he held
regular workouts despite the rain
and mud.

(Continued from Page 1)
Both teams will be at full
strength for the contest, even
though it is doubted whether
Bill Hawkins, Navy's bruising
halfback, will see much action.
He was back in uniform for the
first time in three weeks and is
still recovering from a case of
acute infectious monanucleosis.
Coach George Sauer, the first
civilian mentor at the Naval Aca-
demy since 1933 will have a com-
pletely veteran backfield that can
move effectively in the mud.
Three of the starting backs were
stars of the near-upset Navy
pulled on a muddy field in Balti-
more in 1946. Remember the
Middies lost out, 21-18 and had
the ball on the Cadets four-yard
line as time ran out.
REAVES BAYSINGER was the
quarterback that day, while Pistol
Pete Williams and Al McCully
were also in the backfield. They
were only third classmen then,
but now they're first classmen
and have played together for three
seasons.
The fourth member of the
starting backfield will be Jim
Green, a 175-pounder, who came
up from the Jayvee ranks at the
start of the season.
The Midshipmen can also field

a veteran line led by co-Captain
Scott Emerson at right tackle. At
the other tackle slot will be Jim
Beeler, while Phil Ryan and Har-
rison Frasier will start at the
ends.
Line coach Bob Ingalls, for-
merly one of the famous "Seven
Oak Posts" here at Michigan, will
have Ken Schiweck and Bob Hunt
at guards, and at the pivot slot
will be Tex Lawrence.
., * *
MICHIGAN PROBABLY will
stick to the "terrific 21," the two-
team system Coach Oosterbaan
has been using. But in an effort
to bolster his pass defense the
freshman mentor will use Dick
Kempthorn, Pete Elliott, Wally
Teninga, and Gene Derricotte as
his defensive backfield and hold
Leo Koceski and Chuck Ortmann
ready for offensive action.
The offensive backfield will be
Elliott, Ortmann, Koceski and
Tom Peterson while in the offen-
sive forward line Jack Blott will
use Dick Rifenburg, Joe Soboles-
ki, Dom Tomasi, Bob Erben, Stu
Wilkins, RalphtKohl and Harry
Allis from end to end.
Defensively the Wolverines will
have Ozzie Clark, Al Wistert,
Quent Sickels, Dan Dworsky,
Lloyd Heneveld, Al Wahl and Ed
McNeill in the forward wall.

Weatherman May Assist
Luckless Navy Veterans

By MERLE LEVIN
The curtain goes up on the
home debut of the Michigan Mid-
gets today.
Strictly a mediocre road show
in their only previous engagement
to date the lightweights have done
a little recasting in preparation
for their clash with Ohio State's
ittickeyes at 10 a.m. on Ferry Field.
ShOWING NEW spirit as well
as new faces, the lads who bore
the pre-season title of The Team
to Beat' only to have a fighting
Illinois team change it to 'The
Team That Got Beaten' will be
out to prove that it was all a mis-
take.
They'll have their work cut
out for them against Ohio. The
Bucks are improving rapidly
and Coach John Knight insists
his boys are better then their
26-12 loss to Wisconsin two
weeks ago indicates.
If ever a team had an incen-
tive for winning the Wolverines
do today. It was the Buckeyes who
handed them their only defeat
last. year and although they later

walloped the Ohioans 39-0 that
loss cost Michigan an undisputed
title.
Then too, the little Wolverines
must win this one to keep alive
their hopes for at least a share in
this year's championship.
* * n
MICHIGAN'S STOCK took a
jump upwards yesterday when it
was learned that end Frank
Whitehouse was believed through
for the season would be available
for kicking duties.
Whitehouse has handled the
booting department very ably
since the inception of lightweight
football here last year and will be
of tremendous value, especially if
the game is as close as it figures
to be.
Old man weather masy take a
big part in today's battle. Yes-
terday's heavy rain thoroughly
drenched Ferry Field and
threatened to turn the game in-
to a replica of last year's muddy
encounter.
However the Wolverines are
hoping for the best. Jerry Burns,

Ed Morey and George Sipp have
all shown uncanny ability to
handle and pass a wet ball from
the quarterback position and the
Michigan attack is built around
their passing.
Biggest problem facing the Wol-
verines will be stopping the modi-
fled single wing which the Buck-
eyes used so successfully in last
year's victory and which Illinois
employed against them two weeks
ago to record their 13-6 upset.
A strong Wolverine line led by
Capt. Don O'Connell will be as-
signed that task.' Flanking that
line will be ends John Picard and
Jim Costa; Berry Breakey and
Ted Karmazin will be at the
tackles, O'Connell and Jere Ogle
at guard and Jim Armelogos will
hold down the center position.
Jerry Burns will start at quar-
terback for the Maize and Blue,
Pren Ryan and Johnny Wilcox
will be at the halves and Bud
Marshall at fullback.
Students will be admitted to the
game by showing their ID cards.
Admission will be fifty cents to
the general public.

Petn, vs. Penn State in Game of Week;
Other Big Teams 'Up' for Bowl Bids

NEW YORK-(P)-The clash of
two Quaker State football titans,
unbeaten Penns'ylvania and once-
tied Penn State, gets the nod as
the No. 1 "big game" of today.
But they're all big games now,
brother, for it's November-with
the end of the season not far off
and the lure of lucrative New
Year's Day bowl bids dangling
high.
Most of the major college
conference leaders find them-
selves tomorrow in alley-cat
brawls in their own league back-
yards. The bowl scouts are in
the stands, and a slip-up now
will be just too bad for those
entertaining visions of trips to
warmer climes January 1.
While 78,000 jam Philadelphia's
Franklin Field to see Penn and
State wrangle for the first time in
six years, other thousands of fans
will assemble for important bat-
tles far and wide.
The intersectional slate . is ra-
ther slim, with Stanford's inva-
sion of Yankee Stadium for a
crack at undefeated Army the
day's major fray in that category.
Oft-flattened Navy goes into the
Big Nine where Michigan plans a
warm receptiin in an effort to get
back in the No. 1 spot on the
weekly Associated Press poll.
Aside from these prime en-
gagements, other big games
mostly are conference struggles
that will play big parts in decid-
ing divisional championships
and bowl contenders.

Kansas, however, might have
something to say about this. The
Jay-Hawkers have won three
league games to lead the pack, and
meet both Oklahoma and Mis-
souri after taking care of Kansas
State next week. Kansas, which
got to the Orange Bowl last Janu-
ary, is idle tomorrow.
Out on the Pacific Coast, Cali-
fornia and Oregon can't afford to
ease up against conference rivals
in their bids for a oerth in the
Rose Bowl. Oregon appears to
have the toughest assignment,
taking on Washington at Seattle,
while the Golden Bears entertain
"little brother" U.C.L.A. at Berke-
ley.
North Carolina, the No. 3 poll
team, puts up its unbeaten sta-
tus against William and Mary at
Chapel Hill, but is far from
clinching the Southern Con-
ference crown. Tied for the top
Big Nine
S tandings

with the Tarheels is unbeaten
Clemson, which has a date with
Furman. Duke, unbeaten but
tied in the loop, plays Wake
Forest.
In the Southwest circuit, the
Baylor Bears will put their title
aspirations on the line against
Texas at Waco. The Southern
Methodist Mustangs, very much
in the picture for loop honors and
Cotton Bowl gravy, tackle Texas
A. & M. at Dallas.
Georgia Tech, rolling along
with a clean slate in quest of the
Southeastern Conference Gonfal-
on, meets Tennessee at Atlanta.
The Techmen may have ambitions
for a Sugar Bowl bid. Georgia,
with skirts clear in the conference
but beaten by North Carolina,
faces Florida.
Although Michigan appears a
cinch for Big Nine honors, the
Wolverines can't return to the
Rose Bowl, so Northwestern's
clash with Wisconsin takes on
added importance. The Wildcats
can sew up the Pasadena trip by
taking Wisconsin and then Illi-
nois Nov. 20.
Other main games include
Villanova at Kentucky, Detroit at
Denver, V.M.I. at Tulane, a Sun-
day game between Nevada and
Santa Clara at Sacramento, Pur-
due at Minnesota, Pittsburgh at
Ohio State, Iowa at Illinois, Mar-
quette at Michigan State, Drake
at Iowa State and Kansas State at
Nebraska.

f TV0r things eyey
college, manm should knotr
a/
'r".
+This is a Mother-in-LawComes in
dwife. Keep her around ...
if shec has around a million. Impress her
at breakfast with "Mianhattan" pajamas.
. . ...'
L r These are "Manhattan" pajamas.
Even Mothers-in-Law approve.
Cut full for comfort. And they wear
and wear. Excliv~ue Lanhatan" patterns.
CAMPUS FAVORITE
THE MANHATTAN SHIRT COMPANY
Copr. 1948, The Manhattan Shirt Co.
L -L

i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study Class. The teachings
of Jesus will be studied.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon, "Our
Covenant with God," by Rev. Loucks.
5:00-7:00 P.M.-Guild Program. "The Church
of Our Fathers in Pictures."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Saturday, 4:15 P.M.-Open House after the
game.
Sunday-
9:45 and 11:00 A.M.-Identical Services, with
the pastor preaching on the subject, "We
Consider Christ's Miracles."
5:30 P.M.-Supper meeting of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club, with report of
National Gamma Delta Convention held in
Detroit this weekend.
Monday, 7:30 P.M.-Bible Lecture and Dis-
cussion)
Wednesday, 7:30 A.M.-Holy Communion.
Wednesday, 7:00 P.M.-Student Choir Re-
hearsal. t
Thursday, 4:00 P.M.-Coffee Hour.
Friday, 6:00 P.M.-Dinner and Social Eve-
ning for Married Couples.
Friday, 7:45 PM.-Meet at Center for evening
of sports at I.M. Bldg.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman; Minister
10:00 A.M.-Adult Group. Talk by Dr. Her-
bert Schmale, "Facilities to Assist Psycho-
logical Adjustment."
11:00 A.M.-Services. Rev. Edward H. Red-
man preaching on "A New New Deal."
6:30 P.M.-Unitarian Students. Dr. Rensis
Likert on "Let's Apply a Scientific Method
to Religion."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
Sermon topic: "Mahatma Gandhi, Pioneer
of World Peace."
5:30 P.M.--Wesleyan Guild will hear Rev.
Erland J. Wang discuss "Social Growth"
as one aspect of developing "A Basic Phil-
osophy of life."

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation.
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.-Student bible class at the Church.
10:50 A.M.--Morning Worship. Nursery for
children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister toStudents
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
5:00-7:00 P.M.-Supper at the Congregation-
al Church. A student panel, under the
chairmanship of Dorothy Smith will dis-
cuss "The Predicament of Modern Man."
The meeting will end in time for the
Choral Union Concert.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.-Holy Communion. Sermon by
the Rev. Henry Lewis.
12:15 P.M.-After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-Young People's Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-Canterbury Club supper and Pan-
el Discussion on "The Ecumenical Move-
ment." Canterbury House.
8:00 P.M.-Evening Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. John Burt.
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Seminar on "Gospel of
NV~rk," Canterbury House.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.-Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury
House).
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.M.-Open House, Canter-
bury House.
Saturday, 5:00 P.M.-Canterbury Club "Hard
Times Party." (Phone 2-4097 for reserva-
tions.)
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Student Work-Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant-Miss Jean Garee
Director of Music-Wayne Dunlap
Organist-J. B. Strickland
9:30 P.M.-Junior and Intermediate Depart-
ments, Church School.
9:40 A.M.-Student Bible Study Class led by
Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
10:45 A.M.-Primary and Kindergarten De-
partments.
10:45 A.M.-Public Worship. Dr. Parr will
preach on "Insensible People."
5:00-5:30 P.M.-Student Class in Church-
manship to study "Do You Know?" led by
Dr. Parr.
5:00 P.M.-Congregational-Disciples Student
Guild. Cost supper. Theme: "Predicament
of Modern Man."

MICHIGAN
Northwestern
Indiana
Ohio State
Minnesota
Iowa
'Illinois
Wisconsin
Purdue

4
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1

0
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3

123
61
49
65
66
46
46
72
26

34
51
54
67
53
47
60
74
84

1.000
.750
.500
.500
.500
.500
.250
.250
.250

fI !

tr

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LIBERTY
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518 E. Liberty
HOT CORN BEEF
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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.-Sunday Lesson Sermon.
"Adam and Fallen Man."
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
8:30-9:00 A.M.-Breakfast at the Student
Center.
9:10-10:00 A.M.-Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.-Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.-L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall. The Rev. Charles Hackenberg of
Toledo, speaker.
Tuesday, 7:30-8:30 P.M.-Discussion group at
the Center.
Wednesday, 4:00-5:30 P.M.-Tea and Coffee

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