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November 03, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Goal!

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WITH THE FAMILY-President Truman took Mrs. Truman and
daughter Margaret with him on his initial jaunt across country
opening his 1948 campaign. During the trip he found that if
following his "off the cuff" speeches he introduced them to his
audience, he received a roar of approval. Daughter Margaret told
reporters she "loves campaigning."

THE DEWEYS SAY HELLO-Tom Dewey, stumping the country on his "Dewey Victory Train," on
the issues of "unity" and "its time for a change," always managed to have Mrs. Dewey along. Both
major party candidates emphasized the family angle. Dewey spent a week-end at his mother's home
in Owosso, Mich., and when photographed with both, asked reporters, "Aren't I the lucky one? Here
I have the greatest mother in the world and the greatest wife in the world and I have them both here
with me." The senior Mrs. Dewey was also to be with them on election night.

YOU CAN STILL BE A WINNER-
GET INTO THE PHILIP MORRIS
SCORECAST CONTEST NOW'

THEIR OBJECTIVE-The dream of every American boy since its construction was begun during the
administration of our second president, John Adams, the White House is the aim towards which the
long weeks of campaigning have been aimed. With a rich history that includes its near destruction
by the British in the War of 1812 and the funcral of Abraham Lincoln there in 1865, the house on
Pennsylvania Avenue represents America to the world abroad. Present resident Harry S. Truman
jokingly has signed the hotel register during his campaign trip to all parts of the country as "Harry
S. Truman, White House, Washington, D.C. (Temporary address)."

CANDIDATES RELAX:
White Hose RaceReacestslmx

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By DON McNEIL
The traditionally vigorous part
of American elections - the cam-
paign-was over as of Monday.
The candidates could relax
somewhat on Tuesday and wait
for the voters' decision as to which
one would obtain the mutual ob-
jective-occupancy of the White
House in 1949.

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Scorecost on
M MICHIGAN vs. NAVY
MINNESOTA vs. PURDUE
ILLINOIS vs. IOWA

ing in parades down the main
streets of most of the big towns.
USING THE METHOD he knew
hest, President Truman had de-
livered "offethe cuff" talks from
his train platform; shook an aver-
age of 20,000 hands a day and used
up 14 feet of, train tickets, in
crossing the continent twice.
Dewey had pounded home his

HARRY TRUMAN, Tom Dewey, "unity" theme from coast to
Henry Wallace and to a lesser de- coast, developed bursitis in his
gree J. Strom Thurmond and Nor- right arm from shaking hands at
man Thomas had spent the latter whistle stops.
half of September and the month All major party candidates had
of October stumping the United the help of party stalwarts, Earl
States for the job. Warren, republican vice-presiden-
They had suffered inconveni- tial nominee covering 31 states
ence, even disrespect, as in the and winning hundreds of friends
case of Wallace and I)ewey, who with his folksy way of talking.
were egged and hit with toma-
toes during speeches, to win it. IN THE CLOSING days of the
Truman on his special train and campaign, the two special trains'
Dewey on his "Victory Special" even passed one another in Ohio
had traveled more than 20,000 on adjoining tracks, going in oppo-
miles back and forth across the site directions-Dewey to Chicago
country, delivering hundreds of where Truman had just spoken,
speeches;, shaking hands, and rid- 'and Truman to Cleveland.

The radio, too, got more use
than ever before in a campaign,
with Dewey's and Truman's
speeches being carried over ma-
jor networks, often at the same
time, and Henry Wallace going
so far as to schedule a regular
Monday night broadcast.
In their last hurried efforts to
pick up the votes in New York,
Dewey, Wallace and Truman all
descended on the city at once,
crossing paths and appealing to
different crowds on different
streets simultaneously.
Tired and worn, the candidates
went home Monday to wait--Tru-
man to Independence, Dewey to
New York City.
Wallace after a last try for New
York's votes retired to his New
York state farm, and Thurmond,
who had never wandered far from
the solid south, concluded his
campaign in Jackson, Miss.
This morning they would find
out on whom the American people
had placed their bets.

UNITY-In an unusual campaign picture, before they begap
their verbal sniping in mid-September, President Truman and
Gov. Tom Dewey found themselves 'on the same speaker's plat
form. Adjusted to the situation by a traditional handshake.

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HERE'S WHAT YOU WIN FOR YOURSELF:
1000 p?~~ 1AOI 5U S
PHILIP ORRIS 50 pQ~ ~ORRIS
fOV the scores ight {o risfot0r fo escore i
HERE"S WHAT YOU CAN WIN FOR YOUR LIVING GROUP OR CLUB!

THIRD PARTIES-Henry A. Wallace and Norman Thomas are
two of the other entries in the Presidential sweepstakes this year.
J. Strom Thurmond, a third, and head of the Dixiecrats, was like
Wallace pulling votes away from Harry Truman.

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FIRST PRIZE
A Stunning Large Screen ddta/l
Television Set with full 13 Channel
coverage and Direct-View 10" Tube.
This handsome prize goes to the
Group entering the most ballots dur-
ing entire contest.

SECOND PRIZE
A Beautiful 29d?/ aal Auto-
matic Radio-Phonograph Console
with Miracle Tone Arm. Plays
both 45-minute and standard
records-for Group with second
highest number of ballots entered.

THIRD PRIZE
5lddiVtaL Console Radio
Phonograph with Miracle Tone
Arm. Plays up to twelve records.
Changes records in 31/2 seconds
- for Group with third highe;t
number of ballots entered.

ANN ARBOR CAMPAIGN-Only major party candidate to bring his entourage to Ann Arbor was
Glen Taylor, Henry Wallace's vice-presidential running mate, shown here as his cars move up State
Street. Taylor, in typical campaign style, held a press conference at The Daily, delivered speeches
in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Willow Run areas. Other parties brought their candidates to Michigan
but with the exception of Taylor devoted their time to large cities like Detroit and Flint.

FOR COMPLETE PARROT RESTAURANT
ALEXANDER DRUGS
INFORMATION SEE CAMPUS DRUG
BULLETINS AT: WIKEL'S DRUGS
ANNOUNCING! LAST WEEK'S WINNERS!
_ "WINNERS OF 50 PHILIP MORRIS CIGARETTES"

r t. C. BOONEGEECOR

GENE CROIRE

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