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November 03, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAG)9 rTVE

WEfl~ESI)AY,' NOVEMBER S, IMS PAQ~ ~VE

Draft Deferments

Will Go

To Dental,

Medical Students
WASHINGTON - ('P) - Draft-age students along in training
to be doctors, dentists, veterinarians and osteopaths will get special
draft deferment consideration, Selective Service (SS) said today.
A SPECIAL SS committee of professional "healing arts" men
recommended a complicated deferment setup effective at once. Its
purpose is to keep up the normal flow of students into professional
schools. The recommendations do two things:
University officials indicated that, the new decision is not
expected to cause anw major change in enrollments as the medical

Attack Fatal to
Prof. McHale
DuringSpeech
Prof. Cecil J. McHale, of the li-
brary science department, died
at 3:55 p.m. yesterday, shortly
after he collapsed while making
an address in the League Ball-
room.
He was addressing a regular
meeting of the Ann Arbor Wom-
en's Club on the subject of "Our
Ann Arbor Library."
Prof. McHale, who was 49 years
old, is survived by his widow and
three children: Joseph, an intern.1
in Chicago; Sarah, a sophomore at
the University; and John, a junior
in Ann Arbor High School.
In 1938 Prof. McHale came to
the University as assistant profes-
sor of library science and was ap-
pointed professor last June.
A 'contributor of numerous arti-
cles and reviews in professional li-
brary journals, he was well known
throughout Michigan for his stir-
veys of various public libraries in
the state.

school here already as a long
waiting list.)
1. Practically guarantee de-
ferment for all graduate students
learning to be doctors, dentists,
veterinarians a n d osteopaths,
provided they "satisfactorily pur-
sue full time courses" leading to
graduation.
2. PROVIDE FOR the selection
for deferment from cohlege-level
pre-professional students, who
have completed at least one year
of college and who have decided
upon a professional career by the
time they are 19 years old.
SS said local draft boards are
not compelled to follow the
committee's recommendations,
but that most undoubtedly will.
o Other committees meet the end
of this week to figure out defer-
ment details for other scientific
r students.
Will Speak Today
Stephen Dubrul, head of Gen-
eral Motor's Business Research
Staff, will speak at 8 p.m. today
before an open meeting of Delta
Sigma Pi, international business
- administration fraternity.
The meeting will be held in Rm.
130, Business Administration Bldg.

China Head
Quits After
War Losses
Deny Cabine 's
Mass Resignation
NANKING--(P)-Premier Wong
Wen-Hao, his government shaken
by military disaster in Manchuria,
announced today he will resign.
There were reports his cabinet
already had quit. A government
spokesman denied there had been
any mass resignation.
WONG TOLD a hostile legisla-
tive yuan he twice had handed his
resignation to President Chiang
Kai-Shek.
The premier gave as his rea-
son for quitting his "total fail-
ure" to balance the budget be-
cause of heavy military spend-
ing. The unbalanced budget is
undermining the stability of the
new gold Yuan.
The gold Chinese dollar, intro-
duced several months ago, has
dropped in value from 25 Amer-
ican cents to eight.
CHINESE Communist forces
completed the occupation of Muk-
den and turned south to reengage
the troops of Chiang Kai-Shek.
Communist troops are expect-
ed to take the ports of Unkg-
kow, and Hulutoa, across the
bay, without too much difficulty.
Four Nationalist divisions are
being evacuated by sea from the
two ports.
All members of the U.S. consul
in Mukden have been reported
safe.
Speech Studeni ts
Will Air 'Tell' Tale
The well-known story of Wil-
liam Tell will be dramatized on
this week's "Tales From The Four
Winds" at 5:30 p.m. today, over
WUOM.
One in a series of children's pro-
grams presented Monday through
Friday by the Radio Division of'l
the Speech Department, the play
is under the direction of John
Rich.
The cast will include Al Storey,
John Sargent, Al Samborn, Jim
Kearney, Bob Krell, Bob Tamplin,
Art Prosper, Frank Bouwsma 4nd
Audrey Axelrod.

Former 'U' journalism student'
Russell F. Anderson, editor of
McGraw-IHill World News, will
continue the series, of University
lectures in journalism today with
an afternoon address to students
and an evening lecture to the gen-
eral public.
Anderson will speak on "'So
You Want to Be a Foreign Cor-
respondent" at 3 p.m. in Rm. E,
HaventHall. The editor will give
students information gained from
his own experience in foreign cor-
respondence work.

Former 'U' Student To Give
Two Journalism Lectures

i

"Does the Kremlin Want War?",
a discussiond ofindustrial and
business conditions behind the
Iron Curtain, will be the subject
for his address at 8 p.m. in Kel-
logg Auditorium.
Russell Anderson graduated
from the University Department
of Journalism in 1936. He be-
came 4, foreign correspondent,
after working on editorial and city
desks in Detroit and Pittsburgh
and the foreign desk of Interna-
tional News Service in New York
and Chicago. In 1938, he was sent
to Europe by INS to cover general
and political news.
Mr. Anderson joined McGraw-
Hill in 1945 to help organize the
new World News network which
privately services the 34 publi-
cations in the McGraw-Hill group.

World News
At a Glance
(By 'The Associated Press)
PARIS - Pickets fought their
first battle in defense of the coal
pits of Northern France against
police today, and 22 persons were
injured in the exchange of gun-
fire, grenades and stones.
FRANKFURT, Germany -
Five persons are believed to have
been killed and five others se-
riously injured in the crash of
an American transport plane to-
night en route from Northolt,
near London.
* * *
PARIS - The Slav Bloc today
launched an election day attack
against the United States for its
alleged use of the Marshall Plan
as a weapon against Eastern Eu-
rope.

Michigan grade scholars are
sending their mothers off to school
today and tomorrow to attend the
nineteenth annual Parent Edu-
cation Institute in session at the
University.
When the bell rings at 9 a.m.
today, 1,000 mothers are expected
to be in their seats at the Rack-
ham Building for the opening
class, "The Pre-School Child."
Teacher will be Mrs. Helen Mc-
Call Tewes, chairman on home
and family life education for the
Michigan PTA.
IN ORDER "To raise the stand-
ards of home life," parents will
hear a panel discussion and two
speeches, see films and a special.

EDUCATION INSTITUTE:
Parents of School Children
To Attend Conference Today

dramatics presentation and par-
ticipate in classes on family and
social problems.
"Personality Needs of the
School Age Child" will be dis-
cussed by Dr. Ethel Kawin of
the University of Chicago, at
10:30 a.m.
Dr. Howard Y. McCluskey, pro-
fessor of educational psychology
at the University will be in charge
of the dramatic presentation of a
family council at 1:45 p.m.
* * *
TODAY'S SCHEDULE wil
conclude with movies on parent
education presented by Ford L.
Lemler, director of the Audio-
Visual Education Center at 7:30
p.m.

AVC Forum
Will Discuss
Civil Liberties
Mate CP Secretary
Slated for Program
"Civil Rights and You" will be
the topic of AVC's public forum
scheduled for 7:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the Allenel Hotel.
PURPOSE OF the forum, ac-
cording to co-chairman Buddy
Aronson, is to discuss "the threats
to our civil liberties presented by
the widespread fear in the United
States today."
Among the speakers slated to
air the issue are James Jackson,
Michigan Communist Party sec-
retary; Rev. John Miles, of the
Detroit NAACP; and Jerry Mc-
Croskey, chairman of the Stu-
dent Lawyers' Guild.
Prof. John F. Shepard of the
psychology department will serve
as moderator.
A QUESTIONhAND answer pe-
riod in which the audience may
participate will follow the pre-
pared talks by the speakers.
E peakers will also havehthe oppor-
tunity to question each other.
The forum is part of AVC's cam-
paign to abolish the University
ban on political speakers, for
which the membership has voted
$100.
CAB WillfMeet
To Plan Drive
The Committee To Abolish the
Ban will meet at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in Room 3N of the Union to
complete plans for its campaign
against the University ban on po-
litical speakers.
Present plans call for a cam-
pis-wide petition drive to begin
Monday, with a goal of 10,000 sig-
natures.
A hearing before the next meet-
ing of the Board of Regents, Nov.
13, at which time the petitions are
to be presented, will also be re-
quested.
Latest organization to join the
CAB was SRA, whose compenent
groups voted ten to one to fight
the ban. The Newman Club,
which declared itself in favor. of
the ban, was the lone dissenting
voice.

C4

EXECUTIVE
CAREERS
IN RETAILINI
One-year Course
leads to
Master's
Degree l

- Prepare to step into a responsible
executive position in the retailing field:
h yirg,advertising, fashion, personnel.
Specialized training, exclusively for col-
G loge graduates, covers merchandising,
personnel management, textiles, store
organization, sales promotion, and all
phases of store activity. Realistic ap-
proach under store-trained faculty.
Classes are combined with paid store
work. Students are usually placed be-
fore graduation. Co-educational. Mas-
ter's degree. Tuition $350. Four full-
tuition scholarships available. Limited
enrollment. Write Admissions Office for
Bulletin C.
RESEARCH BUREAU FOR RETAIL TRAINING
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH - Pittsburgh 13, Pa.

At N I MS and M I LLE
a luscious, man-sized
price that SAVES yon

Don't Rob that
ER you get
meal at a
u money.
and MLE

..i

i

E.;,

FRATERNITY MARKET
formerly at 1036 Broadway
is now located
at 1708 South University.

Ohio Tickets
Only 300 combination train
and game tickets for the Ohio
State game on Nov. 20 are left
to be sold.
A spokesman for the Wolver-
ine Club said that the tickets
are going fast, and urged stu-
dents who intend to purchase
,hem to do so immediately.
The train will leave Ann Ar-
bor 6:30 a.m. Sat., Nov. 20, and
arrive in Columbus at 12:30
p.m. The return train leaves
Columbus at '9 a.m. Sunday,
and will reach Ann Arbor at 3
p.m.

lii 21 1 South State
'rIF R nRQwl n n nr~ IT ttNfl "

(Formerly State Cafeteria)

CAFETERIA and COFFEE SHOP

.U

I-'

iii

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Watch

for announcement of grand

opening of up to date self-serve mar-
ket featuring meats, groceries, fresh

and frozen foods, and fresh
goods.

baked

1y'I
DON'T JUST GUESS WHAT GIVES YOU THE BEST SHAVE
-MAKE THIS MOLLE "WEEK-END TEST."

(Continued from Page 4)
Hall. Every member is urged to
attend.
Political Science (t'rarliate SW-
dents: Round Table, 7:30 p.m.,
Thurs., Nov. 4, Rackhamt Assem-
bly Hall. Wives of students and
of faculty members are invited.
Discussion of the Berlin crisis.
Student-Faculty Hour: Thurs.,
Nov. 4, Grand Rapids Room,
Michigan League. Romance Lan-
guages department will be guests
this week. Co-sponsored by As-
sembly and Pan-hellenic associa-
tions.
International Center weekly tea
for all foreign students and their'
American friends. 4:30-6 p.m.,
Thurs., Nov. 4, International Cen-
ter. Hostesses: Mrs. Charles L.

Alpha Phi Omega, Service
tern ity General meeting
unmumLions, 7 p.m., Thurs.,

Stevenson and Mrs. Franklin M.
Thompson.

4,
U, of M, Rifle Clul: Firing, 7-
9:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 4, ROTC
rifle range. There will be try-outs
for the team.
United World Federalists:
Roundtable on World Federation.
7:30 p.m., Thurs., Nov. 4, Michi-
gan Union.
Subject: Role of Nationalism in
World Government Participants:
Prof. R. C. Angell, Sociology Dept..
and Prof. P. A. Thropp, History
Dept.
Moderator: Chester Byrns. Pro-
ponents and opponents of world
government are invited to attend.
Joint meeting with members of
the UN Intercollegiate Council.

Fra-
and
NOV.

STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STU DENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
ST U DENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES,
STU DENT
RATES

50%/(

TIME

below newsstand rates

$5.00 yr.

LIFE

STUDENT
RATES
STU DENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES
STUDENT
RATES

$4.75 yr.

,i

Restricted to Students

-- -----------

-1

use use
Molld your
on t present
this cream
side on
this
side
FEEL THE DIFFERENCE

1. Let your beard grow dur=
ing the week end.
2. Monday morning, when
your whiskers are at their
longest and toughest, put
your present cream on half
your face.
3. Put Moll6, the heavier
brushless cream, on the other
half of your face. Spread it
thin !
4. Go over your face JUST
ONCE with your razor . .
and feel the difference.

1

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.--
...r_ ,
,, ..
t
.
_
7

I

STUDENT PERIODICAL
AGENCY
ROOM 202, DA RLING BUILDING

ver the Fischer Pharmacy
10% / 0-ON _-. eW ..

I 11AE 11D?

,.

li'

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