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November 02, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

sacs say
RAIN EXPECTED:
Local Vote May Smash
All City, County Records

T' HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER. 2, 1948

~TTE TC1TE~ANDAITYTUESAY. OVE_.._____94

1

(Continued from Page 1)
ler, Prohibition; and Charles Buck,
Socialist.
Voters will have to choose be-
tween Douglas K. Reading, in-
oumbent Republican, and
George J. Burke, Jr., Democrat,
in County Prosecutor race.
Highlighting other Washtenaw
County elections, John L. Osborn,
incumbent Republican, will at-
tempt to hold his office of Sheriff
again Joe E. Beeler, Democrat;
Oliver Johnson, Prohibition; and
Kenneth Martin, Progressive.
* * *
QONTENDERS FOR County
Clerk include incumbent Luella M.
Smith, Republican; Thomas C.
Walsh, University student, Demo-
crat; J. H. Turnbull, Prohibition;
and Xenia E. Meader, Progressive.
For County Treasurer, William
F. Verner, Republican; William H.
Kemnitz, Democrat; and Walter S.
Haynes, Prohibition.
Register of Deeds will be the
prize sought by incumbent Allan
A. Seymour, Republican; Kath-
erine E. Swope, Democrat; M.
Luverne Searfoss, Prohibition;
and Mae Ava Phillips, Progres-
sive.
Drain Commissioner will be
fought for by incumbent Ceilon L.
Hill, Republican; Daniel D. Levleit,
Democrat; and Gustave Maschke,
Progressive.
Competing for two open posi-
tions as coroner are incumbent
Edwin C. Ganzhorn, Republican;
William H. Dickson, Sr., Demo-
crat; R. Wallace Teed, Prohibi-
tion; and Alice Sloss, Progressive.
* * *
TIRED VOTERS may be ready
to give up after sifting the merits
of so many candidates,-but the job
is far from done.
On a non-partisan sheet, bal-
lots must be cast for either Jay
H. Payne or Albert J. Rapp, for
Probate Judge.
Three contestants, Edward D.

Deake, Robert V. Fink, and
Charles C. Menefee, are also in
-he running for two positions as
Circuit Court Commissioners.
* * *
"YES" OR "NO" answers will
also have to be marked by voters
to 14 questions added to the bal-
let.
The first six are part of a state
Referendum. Briefly, they are as
follows: No. 1 asks the establish-
ment of Lieutenant Governor, Sec-
retary of State, Attorney General,
State Treasurer, and Auditor Gen-
eral as the order of succession to
the Governor.
No. 2 would repeal the state
tax disversion amendment. No. 3
and No. 4 ask that the salaries of
state officers and legislators be
set by law. No. 5 would loosen
the draw strings around the 15,
mill state taxing limitation. No.
6 would register voter approval
or disapproved of the Callahan
Act to regulate the operations of
"foreign agencies" acting with-
in the state.
Special Advisory Ballot, No. 8,
will decide whether a convention
to revise the State Constitution
should be held.
Plans for a new building to
house local government dominate
three of the remaining five ques-
tions. The other two involve ad-
ditions of land-to the City of Ann
Arbor.
* * *
ALTHOUGH VOTERS in most
of the county will have a long
stay in the voting booths, Ann Ar-
bor citizens will have it easy. Thir-
ty-three voting machines will be
sent out to the city's ten precincts,
according to Clerk Perry.
Clerk Perry emphasized that
voters should make up their minds
who they are going to vote for
before going to the Polls.
"There will be no long lines this
year unless voters decide ° their
stand of all questions-and then
vote," he commented.

Physicist Will
Discuss X-Ray
British physicist and Nobel Prize
winner Sir Lawrence Bragg will
speak on "Recent Advances in
X-ray Analysis" at 4:15 p.m.,
Thursday, in Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Sir Lawrence is well known for
his research on X-ray and crystal
structure, winning the Nobel Prize
in 1915 in recognition of his work
in that field.
Since 1938 he has been Caven-
dish Professor of Physics at the
University of Cambridge.
From 1939 to 1943 he was presi-'
dent of the British Institute of
Physics and is now a member of
the Privy Council Committee on
Scientific and Industrial Research.
While in the United States, Sir
Lawrence will be awarded the
Roebling Medal of the Mineralogi-
cal Society of America.

Under the baton of George
Szell, the Cleveland Orchestra will
present the third concert to the
Choral Union regular series at 7
p.m. Sunday in Hill Auditorium.
Now in its thirty-first season,
the Symphony has built up a high
reputation under such noted con-
ductors as Artur Rodzinski and
Erich Leinsdorf.
- * ~ *
AS ITS PRESENT leader, the
gifted Szell, who directed the
group in their Ann Arbor concert
last year, has made even greater
progress.
Diminutive Farms
CHICAGO-The average Euro-
pean farm is less than 25 acres.
The average farm in the United
States has an area of 174 acres.

Szell began his musical career
as a child prodigy in Vienna,
where at 16 he conducted that
city's symphony orchestra. He
carried out several engagements
in Europe till 1931, when he
came to this country to direct
the St. Louis Symphony.
Marooned in New York at the
outbreak of the war, he continued
his work with the NBC Symphony
and several of the country's ma-
jor orchestras.
JOINING THE Cleveland Or-

chestra as regular conductor in
1946, Szell has added to the repu-
tation- of the orchestra built up
by its previous directors.
Tickets for the symphony's lo-
cal appearance may be purchased
in the University Musical Society
offices in Burton Tower.
'Ensian Tryouts
Tryouts for the 'Ensian editorial
staff will meet at 4:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the 'Ensian editorial
office, Student Publications Build-
ing.

UNDER SZELL'S BATON:
Cleveland Orchestra To Play Sunday

'w

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I

,1

SHOT IN THE ARM-Edith Gisser receiveds her free flu shot at
Health Service. The injection, which practically guarantees Edith
a sniffle-free winter, is being administered by Nurses Margaret
Motter and Grace Cartwright. Students may received their shots
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. until Nov. 5.
NO DISHPAN HANDS:
New Liquid Antiseptic/ oap
Saves Doctors Seven Minutes

MARIE ANTOINETTE

would've been here yet
if she'd worn a

.
fi
' (
..-

EASE WASH DAY
WORK!
Our Drying Facilities have been
expanded so that your wash can
be taken care of immediately.
Each load dries in 5 MINUTES.
25c per Washer Load
Weekdays Saturdays
8:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. 8:00 A.M. - 6:30 P.M.

11

i
,I

By JANET WATTS
University doctors are still in
hot water, but not quite so often
these days.
Liquid soap, pepped up with a
synthetic antiseptic, has cut
down surgeons' hand scrubbing
time from ten to three minutes.
* . *
DR. RICHARD THIRLBY, resi-
dent in surgery, and Dr. Burgess
Vial, instructor in bacteriology in
the medical school, determined
by experiment that the antiseptic,
hexachlorophene, was superior for
operating room use.
Even the seven minutes saved
helps when there are many op-
erations to perform, said Dr.
Vial.
Movie on Cooperatives
To Be Shown Tonight
A movie on the growth of the
co-operative movement in the
United States will be featured at
tonight's meeting of the Ameri-
cans for Democratic Action at 7:30
p.m., Michigan Union.
An election of officers will be
held and plans for the semester
program will be discussed. Special
attention will be directed to the
Workers Educational Service prob-
lem.

The detergent, which has been
used in University Hospital for a
year, has another advantage over
ordinary soap. Alkaline soaps
which destrop the slightly acid
condition of normal skin, are often
irritating. The new anteiseptic
contains no alkaline.
IN ADDITION tests have shown
that the hexochlorophene solu-
tion kills virulent organisms on
the hands more effectively than
simple soaps. '
Sanitation standards in pre-
operation preparation were
first set up by a German sur-
geon, Dr. Furbringer, who es-
tablished the ten minutes scrub
rule in 1887.

~s
t
*1 06 NDSOLO jlE vA4
AT TEI s
Sec te in Delroil at ERNSL KERN * CROWLEY MILNER
Free booklet: "WARDROBE TRICKS". Write Judy Bond, Inc., Dept. E, 1375 Broadway, New York 18

aunwrolnat

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510 E. Williams Phone 5540

Call for Appointments

1

I

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Enriched with 2 special ingredients for
added lustre. Rich with lanolin! Easier to
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No spillover, no dripping, no waste. One
foanmy -hampooleavesyourl airsoftermore
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Large, 6-oz. jar 1.00 t
yyifg t+'

11

"CHESTERFIELD is
building another big,
new factory for us
smokers who like the
MILDER cigarette...

he Quarruj
ON STATE AT THE HEAD OF NORTH UNIVERSITY

YOU ASKED FOR THEM
WE HAVE THEM
SWEAT SHIRTS - TEE SHIRTS
CREW HATS - FROSH DINKS
BANNERS - PENNANTS
WALL SKINS
With the coat of arms of your
fraternity in any color.
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 9533

.i

1949 MICHIGANENSIAN
NOTICE!
isue to &ndinf tZ1ffcultie4o. .
Your '49 STUDENT DIRECTORY
will be delayed until next Monday.
Buy it then for one dollar... the
handiest book on the campus.

It's MYaigarette."
RADIO'S FAVORITE SON
STAR OF CHESTERFIELD'S
ARTHUR GODFREY TIME
.r
4" - t ---9 -------
{ 1,

i wish I could take you in my Navion
-I
plane over the big, new factory Chesterfield
is building at Durham, N. C. It's a honey. It
will help supply the ever-increasing demand
for the MILDER cigarette."

w m -faI7. [ [ : ':; t' :rn }7:}>:X: m}1:}7;:m

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