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October 29, 1948 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-29

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FE iDAYOCTQOBER , 14

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 5SEVEN

Surrisn IOuTor1SR11OuinMi~chi an oni
S S.

a om1 ,

Frosh Dis play Promise
In Scrimmage with JV's

By BOB SANDELL
Michigan's freshmen griddars
tangled with the jayvee squad yes-
terday afternoon, and displayed a
brand of football that Coach
Wally Weber and his assistants
can be extremely proud of.
It was the first really stiff com-
petition for the first year squad,
and they showed plenty of fight
and spirit in the unusually rough
scrimmage with Don Robinson's
crew.
A series of fumbles, bad center
passes, and general bad play start-
ed the Freshmen off on the wrong
foot when they were handed the
ball to begin the scrimmage. It
looked like a hopeless task for
them to do anything against the
bigger and more experienced jun-
ior varsity aggregation.
WHEN THE white-shirted jay-
vees were given the ball, they pro-
ceeded to move down the field and
score with comparative ease. How-
ever, that was the last time they
were going to have things their
way.
Wally Weber's determined
band of first year men took the
ball on their own ten yard line,
and in four plays they complete-
ly electrified the jayvees by
rolling the whole distance to the
goal.
Don Zanfagna, playing in the
tailback slot, started the drive by
smashing over right tackle for
about five yards. This set the
stage for one of the most beautiful
runs any freshman has turned in
this year.

DON PETERSON, operating
from the same fullback position
that his older brother does for the
varsity, broke through left tac-
kle, cut sharply to his left and ran
nearly 70 yards before the dazed
junior varsity could catch up with
him. It was a brilliant display of
broken field running.
Zanfagna then threw a jump
pass to the right end for .five
more yards. On the next play
the speedy left half slashed
over right tackle from the ten
yard line to score easily.
The surprised "B" team then
ftarted from their ten yard line in
an attempt to repeat their earlier
success. They could do very little
against the rampaging frosh, how-
ever, who tackled and played so
viciously that the jayvees fum-
bled several times before the prac-
tice session ended. They had bare-
ly managed to move past the mid-
field stripe when play was halted.
Detroit Exhibition
Carded for Lonis
v DETROIT - (A') -- Heavy -
weight champion Joe Louis will
make his first home town exhibi-
tion appearance in four years here
Nov. 19 when he goes six rounds
with Vern Mitchell of Detroit at
Olympia Stadium. z
Olympia's matchmaker, Nick
Londes, said negotiations were
closed yesterday for Louis to ap-
pear here during his exhibition
tour of the Midwest.

"range and Blue E xhibit
MidSeason Improvement
'M' Gridders Ease Off in Final Sessions;
Punting,_Passing Feature Light Workout
By B. S. BROWN
It has become some sort of ad--
age that whenever a team runs up
against the massive Gophers, it

By MARSHALL SAIaNS
Back in 1931 a tradition that
Ehreatens to outlast the Democra-
tic presidents was started on the
Michigan gridiron.
"Wi tert at tackle" was destined
o echo and re-echo through the
lands of Michigan Stadium and
-lhe pages of Michigan football
history.
Beginning with brothers Fran-
is and Albert, the Wistert dynasty
can currently boast of another
great' in the person of "Li'l Al-
vin," 6 ft., 3 in., 218 pound bul-
wark of the Michigan line.

W sOLVERINE hr1 N:
Wtstert_ hir.1 i __layfr'

GENE DERRICOTTE
... back in form

Bearden Wins
Best Rookie'
onors in AL
Gene Bearden, the tall south-
paw of Cleveland Indians, has
been voted the American League's
rookie-of-the-year.
The cool 28-year-old knuckle-
ball artist who hurled the Tribe
to the American League pennant
in the epic playoff game with
Boston at Fenway Park, thus
joined up with shortstop Alvin
Dark of the Boston Braves as the
frosh standouts of their respec-
tive circuits.
Both received the accolade in
an Associated Press poll of 220
baseball writers throughout the
country. While Dark had an easy
time of it, beating out Richie
Ashburn, 160 votes to 57 for the
Philadelphia Phillies outfielder,
Bearden had strenuous competi-
tion from the Red Sox's Billy
Goodman.

I

undergoes a softening-up process.
And there are still a lot of
people who think Michigan's romp
over Northwestern's Wildcats was
due to the working over the lead-
ing contenders for the Rose Bowl
took from the Northmen th; week
before.
LAST YEAR the Wolverines
were all but ground into the turf
at Ann Arbor by Minnesota's
muscle men and the following
week found themselves pushed to
the limit to win out over the Illini.
And the situation is the same
this season. Both the men on the
lines and the backfield stars
teok an awful pounding at
Minneapolis, one which might
prove to be an important factor
in the outcome of Saturday's
contest.
Illinois hasn't gotten off with-
out bruises, however. Ray Eliot
sent his boys against the Minne-
Dave Strack, freshman bas-
ketball coach, has announced
the start of practice sessions for
this year's frosh squad. All
freshmen interested in coming
out are requested to report to
Strack at the I-M Building
next Monday, November 1.
sota maulers two weeks ago and
watched them take it on the chin,
6-0. But the Gophers evidently
didn't do a thorough job.
FOR LAST WEEK the Illini
bounced back and threw a surprise
package at Purdue, rated earlier
in the year as one of the Confer-
ence powers, and came out on the
happy end of a 10-6 count. ,
And you've only to look at the
Illini's last three games to de-
Li o hwei as
Renew Battle
For Positions
Still smarting from their defeat
at the hands of an underdog Illi-
nois lightweight squad, Michigan's
little Wolverines will be batting for
positions all over again today.
The 150-pounders will run
through their third intra-squad
game of-the season as Coach Cliff
Keen seeks to reassemble his grid-
ders into a winning combination.
Keen will also have a chance
to judge the effectiveness of
his new punters, Jerry Burns
and Ed Morey, under fire in to-
day's game.
Burns and Morey have been
pressed into action in the boot-
ing department as the result of a
back injury to Frank White-
house who had done most of the
lightweight's punting during the
last two seasons.
The midget gridders ran
through a long signal drill yestvr-
day and then went to work on the
tackling dummies in an effort to
smooth out rough spots before
next week's clash with Ohio State.
That game will mark the Wol-
verines 'home debut and will be
the first of three "crucial"
games the boys must win in or-
der to at least duplicate "st
season's feat of tying Wisconsin
for the 'Little Big Nine' title
The Badgers, who play here on
Nov. 12 have beaten Illinois and
Ohio State this year to boast the
only unblemished record in the
four team circuit.

I -
MERLE LEVIN, Night Editor
cide that perhaps theywon't be
the pushover they have been
slated to be.
Army had been going strong
again this year and seemed to be
having an easy time of it when the
first half ended at Champaign
three weeks ago. The score was
20-0 with the Cadets on top.
ELIOT DECIDED things had
gone far enough. He was watching
his pride and joy heading for its
second straight setback.
What he said in the dressing
room is a mystery, but it must
have been a mouthful, for the
I llini camue out and Proc~eeded to
out-score' the black Knights,
21-6, in the second half.
T'hen came the Minnesota game
and Illinois did a remarkable job
in staving off the Gopher attack,
Sbut faltered in the closing minutes
and lost, 6-0.
THE ILLINI put themselves
back in the black last week with
the upset at Champaign. And now
that the Illinois gridders have
found the winning way, they're
going to be awfully tough.
Again, the Illini would like
nothing better than to halt the
Wolverine 19 - game winning
streak, one which started two
years ago after Michigan bowed
to Illinois, 13-9.
You can say that Michigan has
been softened up; you can say
that Illinois is primed for the
game; you can say that Michigan
will be over-confident; or you can
say that the Wolverines will be
under pressure as they again take
to the field in an attempt to ex-
tend their skein.
But no matter what your rea-
sons are, you still have to come to
the conclusion that this game Sat-
urday is going to be more of a
contest than was bargained for
earlier in the season.

hclding a job and serving in the
Army. When the war ended he
got a chance to go to school under
tPe G.I. Bill.
* * *
IN 1946 HE entered Boston Uni-
versity where he gained the dis-
tinction of playing varsity ball in
his freshman year. Then in '47 he
followed the footsteps of his illus-
trious brothers and came to Mich-
igan.
The Moose's specialty is pull-
ing-in the offensive half-backs
on punts. In this particular play
he breaks through the line and
pretends to charge the punter.
This fakes the half-backs out
of position and enables the
Michigan end to sneak inside
tackle and block the intended,
punt.
Al and Ed McNeill, big Michigan
end, worked this play with amaz-
ing efficiency against Minnesota
last week and the two punts Mc-
Neill blocked were of vital im-
portance in setting up Wolverine
scores.

Ijur
5
Jim SA LELw'
d __
tffTUCK 11

Combat
BOOTS
Handkerchiefs
9c
Genuine Army
BLAN KETS
1001/4"Wool
$3.88

A-2
Horsehide
Flight Jackets
. 1PA-NTS

Men's Knit
BRIEFS
47c
Men s
UN DERSH IRTS
39c
Navy Type
OXFORDS

PLAYING with a drive, speed, ?
and sheer power which cannot be
denied Al has brought even more
glory to his glorious name.x
Yet, if it had not been for an
accident "The moose" might
now be wasting his talents on a
major league baseball team.
A star in both baseball and foot- AL WT1TERT
ball at Shurz high school in Chi-
cago, Al had decided on baseball
as a career. days on the diamond but for-
However, fate in the form of a tunately not on the gridiron.
cracked elbow limited his playing Al spent the next eleven years

For your~All Wool Shirts, Jackets - and Hunting
Supplies, too, it's still FOX'S, gang!
FOX TENT AWCNING .
624 South Main Street

Avoiding
Michigan's

all heavy
undefeated

contact,,
gridders

(A-"
HALLO
Get your
~ from the B
our wide se
vorite bran
ing assortm
delicious sn
SBEEI
' ~3031

* .
FOR
)WEEN FUN--
weekend supply of beer
eer Vault. Choose from
lection of nationally fa-
ds. "P.S. See our tempt-
ent of choice wines and
acks. *
DRIVE IN
RY AULT
North Fifth Ave.'

your prescriptions are
double-checked and ac-
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top-quality ingredients...
AT THE
DRUG STORE
SWI FT'S
DRUG STORE
340 South State Street
(THE REXALL STORE
ON 1CAMPUS)

ran through a long practice ses-
sion yesterday afternoon in final
preparation for the invasion of
Ray Eliot's Fighting Illini.
Bennie Oosterbaan stressed all
phases of offense and defense in
the three hour practice, including.
long field goal attempts by Harry
Allis, Michigan's successor to the
artistic Jim Brieske.
Wally Teninga and Leo Ko-
ceski shared the punting duties
while Charlie Ortmann and
Gene Derricotte took charge of
the passing.
Derricotte has looked particul-
arly impressive this week in prac-
tice and though he may be rele-
gated to defense, there is the pos-
sibility that he will see some offen-
sive action.
For the second consecutive week,
all members of the Wolverine
squad were reported physically fit
for the game. John Ghindia, who
p]lays quarterback behind Pete_
Elliott, twisted his leg in practice
Wednesday, but showed no indi-
cation of injury yesterday.
ra
"At the next signal, light
your Dr. Grabow Pre-Smoked
Pipe"

$

p
Ann Arbor CTH -AI TE Clothiong
113 SOUTH MAIN.. Next to Sugar Bowl

.97

$6

77

HOMECM EAT NG!

4
S
J
s
00 00
k a_ i ° 1
4+
qq f 9 1 i _ fffff11111 ~,,,
4 4 y

DICK MALOY

City Editor of
The Michigan Daily

It isn't -Homecomiig ivithiout a DANCE!

t
^r
..-..'
t

l
f
..1 t
, a
,,JJ,°
t / '_ ~ t
,r
.,. 1

and we're having two!!
There's a delightful, danceful
evening for you at the
MICHIGAN UNION
both Friday and Saturday
with Frank Tinker and
his Orchestra. 9-12 P.M.

0 , VA'

No Waste of Your Time!

fla

No Long Lines!

I

There's room for over 200 people in the huge, new cafe-
teria operated by Dick Nirms and Doug Miller at 211
South State Street. Two lines prevent any delay in serving
you luscious, man-sized meals at just-right prices.

&N 1. 71

I'

No Breaking In
No Bite

lim rlll - vm

A

i

':: £ : ..

E

1111

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