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October 23, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SI

THIE MICIGAN DATU

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 191

T __ -- - ----- -----

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LIBERAL EDUCATION?
Beer and Liquor Ban Falls
To Curb Student Drinking

Students are buying as much
beer and liquor as ever despite
the University ban on drinking in
residences, according to local
druggists and beer merchants.
In fact, coeds are buying more
beer this year than ever before,
one proprietor declared. "They're
getting educated to drink," he said.
* * *

liquor," was the way one druggist
put it.
"I don't think the ban has had
any effect whatever on business,"
another said. "If anything, sales
have increased."
* .* *
THE PROPRIETOR of a beer
drive-in said, "When the ban
first went into effect we noticed

Hunters Held
For Carrying
Huge Arsenal
LANSING - (UP) - Two Ohio
hunters, held for more than 36
hours, finally were allowed to con-
tinue on a trip to Canada after
they threw a scare into Lansing
police and the Ingham County
sheriff's department.
Lansing police and sheriff's of-j
ficers set up a road block here and
nabbed the men, identified by
Sheriff Alan Mac Conald as Rob-
ert W. Cook, 21, and Donald C.
Tucker, 20, both of La Rue, Ohio.
Searching the car, police found
two shotguns, an army rifle, a
.38 calibre revolver, a .32 calibre
pistol, a fountain pen gas gun, a
butcher knife and a quantity of
shells. All this the two men pro-
tested, merely represented the
equipment for a bang-up hunting
expedition.
They were released without
charges Friday afternoon when
police finally were convinced the
arsenal was intended only for the
destruction of wildlife.

SIX OF THE businessmen, all a drop in sales for the first month
of whom operate businesses close or so. But since then it hasn't hurt
to campus, say that sales have not business."
been affected by the year-old rul- "It looks as though all the
ing. (Last fall the University pro- ban ever did was drive the stu-
hibited drinking on University dents underground," he said.
property or in residence halls.)."
All of the druggists emphasized
Some of them even reported that they checked ages before sell-
that overall sales are up over ing students liquor, or beer. A large
last year., percentage of their customers fall
"As long as a student's got a in the slightly-over-21 category,
thirst and a girl, he's going to buy they said.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

FOND FAREWELLS-"Satira," the exotic dancer sent to jail for
the yacht murder of John Mee, bids farewell to other cellmates
in a Cuban jail after serving 18 months of a 15 year sentence.
Legally she is Patricia Schmidt, of Toledo, Ohio.
KEEP IT CLEAN:
Filters and Chiorintor
(ee U' Pools Saniiary

Contest Will
Offcr Prizes
Vaiae of Awards
ota l $1 00,000
The National Five Arts Award,
Inc., an organization designed to
discover, aid, and stimulate crea-
tive writing in Colleges and Uni-
versities, has announced its first
annual contest for Awards and
Fellowships totaling one hundred
thousand dollars.
Open to all writers, the contest
is primarily for college age people.
It is sponsored by Norman Ger-
stenzang, Inc., manufacturers of
the Normandy Pen.
PRIZES WILL BE awarded in
the fields of the full length play,
the radio script, the popular song,
the screen original, the short story,
and the short short.
There are six cash awards in
each category: a $2,000 first
prize, a $1,000 second prize, and
four prizes of $500 each. In addi-
tion, and in a special effort to
obtain recognition and financial
assistance for young writers,
$70,00of the total Awards will
be granted in the form of 140
Fellowships of $500 each.
These Fellowships, like the cash
prizes, will be awarded on the
basis of merit alone, rather than
age or academic degrees. They will
be granted to writers of talent and
promise, who may use the Fellow-
ship money in whatever manner
will best further their careers.
IN EACH FIELD, the National
Five Arts Award proposes to ob-
tain professional production and
publication of the most meritori-
ous play, script, stories, and song.
The author will receive full royal-
ties in conformity with the high-
est standards set by all the Writ-
ers' Guilds.
The contests require a two
doll1a r entry fee on the first
manuseript submitted, and aone
dollar fee for each additional
entry.
Closing date of the contests is
January 31, 1949. Announcement
of the winners will be made April
1, 1949, or as soon thereafter as
possible.
EACH CATEGORY will be
judged by a panel of three, all
writers,critics or producers of na-
tional reputation and distinction.)
Anyone wishing to obtain fur-
ther information may write to The
National Five Arts Award Inc., 715
Fifth Avenue, New York 22, N.Y.
Gi; to the Red Feather

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THIS HEAVENLY MAGIC
will make you lovelier and
more endearing to him. D'Or-
says "Divine Perfume" $5.50
up. Cologne $3 up. CALKINS
FLETCHER.

C hic
Chat

AROUN THErowa

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EVENING TO REMEMBER
and he will remember you too
in your new fall formal from
MARTI WALKER'S $17 - $35

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LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
8:30-9:00 A.M.: Breakfast at the Student
Center
9:10-10:00 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall - Mr. Theodore Markwood, Speaker:
"If We Obey Him We Will Serve Him In
The Church."
Tuesay-
7:30-8:30 P.M.: Discussion Group at the
Center
Wednesday-
4:00-5:30 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour at the
Center
Morning Devotions-
7:35-7:55 A.M.: Tuesday and Friday at the
Center.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study Class. The teachings
of Jesus will be studied.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon, "Man
Needs Fellowship," by Rev. Loucks.
6:00-8:00 P.M.: Guild Program. Father
Sophocles will speak on "The Church of
Beauty" (Greek Orthodox).
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:00: Worship services,
with sermon by the pastor, "A Potential
Ally."
Sunday at 5:30: Supper meeting of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
Thursday at 4:00: Coffee Hour.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
Sermon topic: "Is a Christian World Order
Possible?"
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild will have small
groups discuss "Personal Growth" asone
phase of the theme, "Basic Philosophy of
Life," their program for the year.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.-"Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00: Bible Schools
11:00: Your last chance to hear Dr. Homer
Hammontree,
"Negative and Positive Christian Lives"
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: Service with Dr. Hammontree,
"The Unanswerable Question."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.-Sunday Lesson Sermon.
"Probation after Death."
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Westminster Guild Bible Class
with coffee and rolls -at 9:00 A.M.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon topic
for Dr. Lemon, "Paths to Reality."
5:30 P.M.-Westminster Guild supper fol-
lowed at 6:30 P.M. by discussion on "Chris-
tianity and Industry" by the Rev. Wm.
Molbon of Detroit.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation.
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.: Student Bible Class at the Church
10:50: A.M.: Morning Worship
Nursery for children dpring the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Woik
6:00 P.M.: Supper at the Congregational
Church. Panel discussion "On the Assem-
bly Line" by members of the Guild who
were "Students-In-Industry" this past
summer.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. John Burt.
12:15 P.M.-After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.-Young People's Fellowship, Page
Hall.
5:30 P.M.-Canterbury Club Supper and
Program, Canterbury House.
8:00 P.M.-Evening Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Seminar on "Gospel of
Mark," Canterbury House.
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Married Students Club
Supper, Page Hall. Seaker: The Rt. Rev.
Richard Emrich, Ph.D.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.--Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury
House).
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.l.--Open House, Canter-
bury House.
Saturday, 8:00 P.M.-Hallowe'en Party, Can-
terbury House.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Student Work-Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant-Miss Jean Gaee
Director of Music--Wayne Dunlap
Organist-J. B. Strickland
9:30 A.M.: Interinedate and Juniori D'pai H
ments of Church School
9:40 A.M.: Student Bible Cuss led by Rev.
H. L. Pickerill.
10:45 A.M.: Primary and Kindergarten De-
partrnents.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. "Spreading the
News" will be the subject of Dr. Parr's
sermon.
5:00 P.M.: Churchmanship study group for
students led by Dr. Parr.
6:00 P.M. : Congregational-Disciples Guild.
Cost Supper. The study of "The Predica-
ment of Modern Man" will be continued.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
Interdenominational
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards--Chapait
10:45 A.M.-Divine Worship. World octti
Sunday. Sermon: "Autonomy Runnm ir
Wild."
10:45 A.M.-Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.-Discussion and Study: "United
Nations and the Palestine Issue." Jack
Cunningham, leader.
5:30 P.M.-Fellowship Supper and meeting
of the Executive Committee.

By PETER HOTTON
The two 'U' swimming pools
don't take the place of the ol'
swimmin' hole back home, butl
they're still fun and a lot cleaner.
More than 800 persons swim in
the Union and IM pools every
day and an elaborate and expen-
sive cleaning program keeps all
the swimmers safe and happy.
THE TWO TANKS are so much
alike that it is hard to tell one
system from another. There is the
IM pool, where freshmen havel
classes, the varsity trains andI
holds meets, and countless stu-
dents and faculty members go just
to take a p~lunge or two.
21 years old and just as clean
as the day it was made, the IM
tank is filled with 165,000 gal-

Ions of water cleaner than that
you drink.
To keep it clean, the water is
constantly purified by three filters
and a chlorinator.
THE FILTERS are barrel-like
affairs six feet high and 36 inches
in diameter, and filled with quartz
crystals ranging from a coarse
gravel to a fine sand through
which each drop of water goes
every nine hours.
The big "man-hole cover" at
the deepest part of the pool is
the outlet to the filters. Re-
heated to about'75 degrees after
being cleaned, the water comes
back into the tank through 14
inlets, five on each side and two
on each end. This way there are
no ice-cold corners and spots to
make things miserable for the
swimmers.
Once a week the filters are
backwashed. By this process the
water goes the opposite way up the
filters and carries residue to a
drain where it is disposed.
** *
ONLY FOUR to eight parts of
chlorine are used to every million
parts of water, which amounts to
less than a pound for each tank-
ful. The amount varies with the
traffic in the pool.
The chlorinator, about the size
of a console radio, turns rock sot
into sodium hydrachloride which
is injected into the water in drop-
lets.

S t
TOUCH OF GREEN
Brighten your room up, during
the bleak winter with a potted
plant or dish garden from the
UNIVERSITY FLOWER
SHOP. E. University.

GLITTERING JEWELRY
Our store has been trans-
formed into a treasure chest.
Come to EIBLER'S for that
anniversary gift.

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ltil

AT LOW COST . ..
z'Dance Programs
£Dance Tickets
1nqu1t rograms
, 41
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CA3C P.SS
DatiMincerogPhamsO

Y'dA~II

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NUTTY OVER SKIRTS!
Just the thing. New straight
gabard ne fly front skirts at
MADEMOISELLE. Blue, gray,
black, green. $11.95. Also gray
men's wear $6.50.

NEW FALL STYLES
in
WOOL JERSEYS
CREPES
White and colors included.
Size" 32 to 38. Values to $7.95.
ALL SALES FINAL
PECA SLTY Stao
306 South State

I

KNIT TWO, PURL TWO
He will love it if you make it,
so start this Christmas pres-
ent early by stopping in at the
KNIT SHOP. 725 N. UNIVER-
SITrY.

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AT LaST!

ABra You (AL4't' I

COZY TOESIES
Rid yourself of the football
nip and get those stadium
boots that zip. Black, brown,
and red at RANDALL'S. $6.95

ash Out of Shape -

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YOU'RE A *
LASS

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group. "Educational Prob-
lems in Ann Arbor." Miss Marian Cran-
more.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship. Prof. James
Luther Adams, Univ. of Chicago, preach-
ing ':'The Holy Ground of Democracy."

br
S diuu . . . .
Here is the bra with the exclusive
inner cup construction to lock bust
in place. Fused lining prevents wrinkling.
Deep low neckline-stitched shoulder

THE HONEY BUG
It's pert, young, becoming to
every face. . . and has a Paris
flavor you'll love. College and .;
career girls . . . smart women
everywhere . . . will wear this

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH

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