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October 22, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-22

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PAGE SIX

TAI MICHIGETAN DAITY

FIUAY, OCTOBER 22, 1048

BAILIFF'S BELL CLANGS:
'Oyez,_Oyez,' New Barristers Initiated

By BOB LAYTON
A group of thirty-five smiling
students all wearing black shoe-
string ties stood in the middle of
the Law Quad last Tuesday,
waited till the third ring of the
Bailiff's bell was sounded, then
shouted in unison the traditional
cry of the Barristers-"Oyez.
oyez."
This scene was the final step ir
the initiation of 23 new member.
into the Barristers Club-senio:
honorary society in the Laxx
School. The traditions of the
Barristers have gone unchangec
since '02, but this year something
new was added.
UNNOTICED BY any of the
professors or students, a. disbe-
liever hid himself behind one of
the buildings and caught the law-
yers flatfooted when he shouted
"You guys are crazy" after the
third ringing of the bell. The sur-
prised Barristers were forced by
tradition to respond - "Oyez,
oyez."
Originated in 1902, the Bar-
risters Club is unique to the
Michigan campus and lists
among its distinguished mem-
bers Supreme Court Justice
Frank Murphy.
The men who wear the shoe-
string ties to the bi-monthly meet-
ings of the group are selected on a
completely objective basis as is il-
lustrated by the organization's
chief purpose which is to promote
conviviality and fellowship among
men in the Law School, and cross
lines between students living
within -and outside of the Lawyers
Club and married and single men.
THE BARRISTERS are not a
fraternity, and although most
members are seniors in the Law

School, an occasional faculty members publish the "Raw Re-
member is initiated into the or- view," a take-off on law and
der of the shoestring tie. lawyers.
The club sponsors several so- In addition to Lovett, the Bar-
cial events throughout the risters' officers includyr Richard

Daily-Dave Heggen
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH-Members of the Barristers Club
of the Law School are shown here questioning a prospective
member about his qualifications. Left to right are: Bob Wilcox,
on the stand, Wells Lovett, Chancellor of the Barristers presiding,
and Dave Morton, asking the questions.

Laboratory
Of fers Help
O frip. Statistics
A lift to grad students and
University staff members handi-
capped in research work by lack
of statistical training is provided
by the Statistical Research Lab-
oratory, 3034 Rackham building.
The Laboratory offers offers
three types of service. It advises
persons doing research on ques-
tions concerned with the appli-
cation of statistical methods. It
provides computing machines
without cost if the research is
personal and not backed by a
grant. And finally through its
staff it aids the research worker
to analyze data both of a statis-
tical and non-statistical nature.
The staff at the Research Lab
emphasizes the value to be de-
rived by the researcher in receiv-
ing suggestions concerning the
collecting of appropriate data be-
fore a statistical investigation is
launched, rather than asking for
help in analyzing data after it has
been accumulated.
Advice at the beginning enables
the researcher to collect material
having direct bearing on the prob-
lem at hand.
Director of the Laboratory,
which opened in 1946, is Prof. C. C.
Craig.
Cairo Editor
To Talk Here
"The Middle East and the Inter-
national Scene" will be discussed
at 8 p.m. today at Rackham Am-
phitheatre by Dr. John S. Badeau,
president of the American Univer-
sity at Cairo since 1945.
Dr. Badeau resided in Iraq for
seven years and has been connect-
ed with the American University
of Cairo for 13 years. During the
War, he was called to the United
States to serve as Chief Regional
Specialist of the Middle 'East Di-
vision, OWI.
He has written a book for the
Foreign Poicy Association and is
editor of the only professional ed-
ucational journal in Arabic which
circulates in the Middle East.
Dr. Badeau is currently on a
lecture tour through the United
States. The Arab Club of the Uni-
versity is sponsoring an invita-
tion tea and a dinner today in his
honor.

MISSING BABY FOUND-Jo Ann Mezzanote, 2 -month-old
girl who was abducted from her carriage Oct. 19, at Baltimore,
Md., is shown above with her happy and relieved parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Mezzanote, in their home after she was found
by police.
Varsity Debaters To Demonstrate
Skill Before High School Orators

There's a lot of beer flowing on
this campus, but not very much of
it is being used for liquid refresh-
ment.
Instead, six people feed beer to
thousands of bacteria every day
in a laboratory in the Public
Health Building.
Edward Armbruster, research
Junior College
Faculties.Meet
Over 250 Will Hear
Adams,_McBurney
More than 250 faculty members
will attend the Michigan Junior
College Association annual meet-
ing to be held at the University to-
day.
Provost James P. Adams will bej
the principal speaker at the
morning session which meets at
10:15 a.m. in Kellogg Auditorium.
His talk will deal with the place
of Junior Colleges in the educa-
tional system.
President Alexander Ruthven
will greet the members of the As-
sociation at a luncheon in the
Michigan Union. Speaker at the
luncheon will be Dr. James Mc-
Burney, dean of the school of
speech at Northwestern Univer-
stcy.
During the afternoon smaller'
section meetings will be held to
deal with specific educational,
topics.
,The Legislative assembly of the
Association will meet at 3:30 p.m.
in the Michigan Union. Dr. Ar-
thur Andrews, president of the
Association will conduct the meet-
ing.

associate, and five technicians are
studying the problems of the vari-
ous methods of dish washing to
determine which is most effective
for restaurant use.
* * *
ACCORDING TO Armbruster,
up to a million bacteria, some of
them causing diseases, can be
found on a single beer mug. Health
Standards set up a measure of less
than one hundred germs for a
"safe" glass.
Under the sponsorship of the
National Sanitation Foundation,
a cold sterilization research pro-
gram has been set up in the
school of Public Health.
Armbruster and Dr. G. M. Rid-
enour, associate professor in Pub-
lic Health Engineering, direct the
study of various quatenary ammo-
nium sodium hypo chorite com-
pounds used in dish washing prac-
tices.
THE RESEARCH men pour
beer, milk and other liquids mixed
with various germs in glasses and
allowed them to dry to simulate
the same results found on an or-
dinary dirty beer glass from any
tavern.
Tumblers are then washed
with some detergent, for glasses
must be clean in order to be
sanatized. Sterilizer solutions
cannot kill bacteria on a dirty
glass, according to Armbruster.
After placing the glasses in ster-
ilizer, they are examined. "Our
study hopes to eliminate health
hazards in dish washing methods,"
said Armbruster.
A thousand- dollar dish washing
machine recently produced is be-
ing used in the experiments. The
apparatus complete with levers,
brushes, and racks, washes glasses,
pWaces them in sterilizer, and dries
them in one process.

BUGS ON BIG BINGE:
Lots of Beer on Campus,,
but Bacteria Get It All

school year, and, according to
Wells Lovett, Chancellor of the
Barristers, the Wig and Robe
Ball will take place Dec. 3 at
the Union. At this time the

C3ecrest, Master of Rolls,
Wumkes, Master of the
quer, and William Ager,
Prof. H. R. Coffey is the
adviser of the group.

W. W.
Exche-
Bailiff.
faculty

ueIuench's Orchestre National
To Present Concert Monday
4 ___________________

A demonstration by the varsity
debaters will be featured tomorrow
when 300 high school debaters
gather in Kellogg Auditorium for
the annual High School Debate
Assembly.
Purpose of the gathering will be
to discuss the official debate ques-
tion, which concerns world gov-
ernment, and to give special in-
struction in debate techniques, ac-

cording to Ray Nadeau, University
debate director.
At the first session world gov-
ernment will be discussed by Sam-
uel Levering, president of the Na-
tional Friends Service Committee,
member of the national executive
council of the United World Fed-
eralists, and Prof. Tibor Payzs,
chairman of the political science
department at the University of
Detroit.

NINE OUT OF TEN
COME BACK AGAIN
to

Leading the Orchestre National
of France through its concert
Monday evening in Hill Audito-
rium will be conductor Charles
Muench, whose fame has spread
throughout the world and into the
annals of the French Legion of
Honor.
BEGINNING HIS career as a
violinist, Muench was named a
professor at the Paris Conserva-
tory in 1919, when he also became
concertmaster of Strasbourg.

After years of apprenticeship,
Muench made his debut as a
conductor in 1932. There fol-
lowed a period of increasing
greatness during which Muench
led the Society Philharmonique
of Paris and the Orchestre du
Conservatoire.
With the advent of World War
II, Muench and his orchestra went
underground, yet kept their native
music before the eye of the sub-
jugated French people. For his
services during this period, the
conductor was later named Chev-
alier in the Legion of Honor.
Since the Liberation, Munech
has been guest conductor with the
New York, Chicago, Cleveland, and
other major American sympho-
nies.

"DINE

with the

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in Dexter
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What's Up in the Dorms

Give to the Red Feather
DON'T BE LATE FOR
YOUR HOMECOMING DATE!
WATCH, CLOCK, REPAIRS
for less than $6.75 at
U
VETERANS' WATCH REPAIR SERVICE
ALL WORK DONE BY CERTIFIED CRAFTSMEN
o BLUEFRONT CIGAR STORE, State at Packard
" CAMPUS DRUG, S. State at Liberty
* WITHAM DRUG, S. University at Forest
s WEST LODGE PX, Willow Village
We ha~~ve ust rcived
AN ENTIRE NEW .LINE
TWO-PIECE SUITS
BLAUTIFUL VELVET ENS, GABARI)JN ES,
FAILLES, AND CORDUROYS
NEW TWEED SKIRTS
CASHMERE SWEATERS
MATCHING SETS AND PULLOVERS
The Martha Barrett Shop
INVITES YOUR INSPEACION
345 MAYNARID STlREET Form erly "n,
.4 4.ih

Drive-In
BEER VAULT

off/v

REXALLUS
ONE CENT
SALE
Two articles for
the price of one
plus one cent
now going on
at
SWI FT'S
DRUG STORE

(Editor's note: Contributors to What's
Up in the Dorms should contact Do-
lores Palanker at The Daily or 10
Betsy Barbour.)
Dr. E. S. Bordin of the psychol-
ogy department, vocational guid-
ance counselor, was the guest of
Allen-Rumsey House, West Quad,
last night where he spoke to the
men in the lounge after supper.
Dr. Lionel Laing of the politi-
cal science department will be
Allen-Rumsey's dinner guest Oct.
28. He will speak on the Student
Legislature.
At a meeting of the East Quad
Council, Jerry Ryan was elected
president and Val Johnson, sec-.
retary-treasurer.
* 4- *
WENLEY HOUSE again took
top honors in the Independent
League track meet with Jack
Bryant accounting for two of the
three first places by clearing the
high jump bar at 5 feet 4 inches
and putting the shot 38 feet 8
inches.
Last semester, Weidey was
first in the indoor track
meet, and this semester, under
its new athletic director, Web"
McCormack, and Garth Kirken-

dall, it is exhibiting the same
prowess. In football Wenley last
week beat Michigan House 19-0
and this week Cooley House
14-0.
OFFICIAL SCHMOO Head-
quarters, consisting of four mem-
bers of the Royal Order of the
Schmoos, have been set up in
Stockwell Hall. Three are MostIl-
lustrious Members, while the
fourth, a Most Lowly Member, is
so-called because of her recent
initiation.
Official rushing took place
Wednesday with each rushee re-
quired to wear at least a hat.
To pledge, one must offer proof
of three Schmooey acts. Atten-
dance was heavy indicating an
increase soon in Most Lowly
Members.
Members of the Royal Order
greet, each other with "Schmoo-
o," and part with "Schmoo-by."
All must commit one Schmooy act
a week.
Among activities is choosing
Schmoos of the Week. Last week's
selections were the unfortunate
fellows who disapprove of Michi-
gan's coed pulchritude.

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