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October 21, 1948 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-21

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TURUSD~AY, OCTOBER, 21, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

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7

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Speedsters

Set

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Flatbush Demands Pennant
Winning Club from Rickey

NEW YORK-(A')-We don't
see why the Brooklyn Dodgers
fans should be sore because their
club didn't win the National
League pennant.
After all, didn't Montreal win
the pennant, and playoff, and the
junior world series, and isn't
Montreal a close relative of the
Dodgers? Of course, the Brooklyn
fans didn't see Montreal play, but
0' ujn Takes
Lead in Pass
Catching Race
NEW YORK.-P)-The race for
pass-catching honors among col-
legiate grid stars of the nation, a
wide open affair this season, finds
a new man out in front today for
the fourth time in as many weeks.
He is Johnn O'Quinn of Wake
Forest, who caught five forward
passes for, 117 yards and one
touchdown against Duquesne last
Saturday.
That ran his total to 20 catches
in five games and sent him to the
top of the National Collegiate Ath-
letic Bureau's weekly standings
where he replaced Tennessee's Jim
Powell, who was shut out by Ala-
bama.
Not only does O'Quinn top the
nation in total number of passes
caught, the figure on which the
NCAB bases the standings in that
department, but he also leads in
total gains on forwards with 254.

they should be right proud of the
club.
AND DIDN'T Fort Worth win
the Texas League pennant and
playoff? That's a Dodger prop-
erty, too.
And all told didn't Dodger
properties win nine playoff ti-
tles and eight pennants, with 22
of the 27 clubs finishing in the
first division of their respective
leagues?
What do the Brooklyn fans
want, anyway? A pennant winner
in Brooklyn? Don't answer that.
THE UNADULTERATED fact is
that the Brooklyn fans probably
don't care if the Dodgers have 50
farm clubs and each club wins a
pennant by 20 games. All they give
a whoop about is where the papa
club finishes, and anywhere be-
low first place isn't high enough.
It really is a remarkable rec-
ord compiled by the organiza-
tion this year, at that, and if
the Brooklyn fans can find any
solace in the fact, the future of
the parent club is directly in-
fluenced by the current showing
of the minor league affiliate.
Great oaks from tiny acorns
grow, they say. Not* meaning,
necessarily, that Dodger tiams
of the future will be made up of
blockheads.
The Brooklyn fans still have a
hangover grudge against Branch
Rickey for swapping off Eddie
Stanky and Dixie Walker, and
they feel he robbed them of a pen-
nant by the deals. They wanted
to win this year, and a hungry
man doesn't care about promises
of a big meal next week. He wants

yards.

it right now.

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He might as well not, without a
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GRA iromiA d
G RANT STA N
By MURRAY GRANT... Daily Sports Editor
(Today's column was written by B. S. Brown, Daiiy Sports Night Editor).
THE SPIRIT of the Scottish Highlands has invaded the Michigan
grid camp, for there's a bit of Angus in the boys this year.
Bennie Oosterbaan's defensive unit has been giving up yardage
like a Scotchman doles out the shekels. In either case, there just isn't
too much you can wail about. And when it comes to yielding TD's,
you might as well say that the laddies just don't believe in it.
Because it's a virtually unscored-upon Michigan eleven that
Bennie will be taking to Minneapolis this week-end to stem the
Gopher attack. But for a freak touchdown in the season's opener
with State, all four of the Wolverine victims would have a lot in
common, namely, a vacuum in the scoring column.
"FRITZ" HAD A GOOD BUNCH of boys up on the firing line last
year, too, but their record falls far short of the performances put
on by the laddies of '48.
And it's not too difficult to figure. Bennie inherited more than
a football team from the "master"; he picked un an experienced
defensive team. With three exceptions, Bennie is fielding exactly the
same defensive line that took to the sod in 1947.
Al Wahl, Ozzie Clark and Lloyd Heneveld are the newcomers,
but all around them are veteran players. Big Al Wistert is still
holding down one of the tackle slots, Quent Sickels continues to
charge from his guard position, and Ed McNeill nails down the
end of the line with the same ability that made him the capable
other half of Lenny Ford last year.
These three intruders on the set-un haven't ruined the experience
the other boys picked up in 10 games last year. They were just welded
into the line and Bennie did a good job. No flaws have shown u yet,
and that forward wall has had some of the best thrown at them.
Northwestern, Purdue, Oregon and the Spartans tossed the fireworks
into the line and all they got out of it was one disputed touchdown.
AND THAT, too, isn't hard to figure. Returning from a premiere
performance in the '47 season, Michigan's twin killers continue
to astound the opposition with ferocity perhaps never equalled in
gridiron history. There are holes opened up in the line, but Danny
Dworsky and Dick Kempthorn have learned their job and they've
learned it well. The gaps are closed almost before they open, which
is just about enough to frustrate any guy who's lugging the leather.
Those two bruisers will go down in my All-American book any
day in the week. You just can't stop them.
Back in the secondary, we again find that Bennie was left with
nothing to squawk about. Pete Elliott is still there; Gene Derricotte
is still there (or he will be when he returns to the Michigan backfield
against the Northmen) and Wally Teninga is back. The Michigan
mentor had to find a replacement for Bump Elliott and work him in
with the rest. Along came Chuck Ortmann and Bennie had his
defensive team.
Right now the laddies are aiming at a couple of records set
by Fielding Yost's wizards back in the early years of the century.
Last year they equalled his 49-0 shellacking in the Rose Bowl.
Now they're gunning for the 32-game winning skein the grand
old man set with his Michigan teams. They're more than halfway
there.
But the defensive team has its eyes on a mark which is just about
as enviable. In 1901, Yost piloted a team that was unscored upon.
That was the same team that put the shillelagh to Stanford out in
Pasadena. Bennie's Scotchmen may not go to the Rose Bowl, but
they're going to do their damnedest in keeping that final stripe un-
touched by the opponents' cleats.
? r
- -ac,
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TIME AND

AGAIN in scrim-
e aj

By JOHN BARBOUR
In a taunting "Who's afraid of
the big bad wolf" practice yester-
day, Michigan's Wolverines ran
through, over, and around a oon-
fused jayvee line.
If it's a strong line that Min-
nesota is banking on, it's a fast,
quick - breaking backfield that
Michigan is using to counterbal-
ance it.

light scrimmage but favored his
leg as the backfields rotated.
IIS MAIN JOB next Saturday
will probably be defense against
the .666 passing of Minnesota's
Dick Lawrence. Connecting in 8
out of 12 attempts Lawrence has
piled up 211 yards of aerial traf-
fic.
In Minnesota's 6-0 tripping
of Illinois last weekend, Law-
rence picked up 101 yards in the
air on two completions, a dan-
gerous average. .
Michigan's pass defense looked,
as Crisler would say, good, mean-
ing very effective. It would have
to be. The passing of Lawrence
was not all that the Wolverines
would face. Everett Faunce .500
hurler from Gopherland is a
threat on the ground as well as in
the air.
WOLVERINE END Dick Rifen-
burg worked on the Michigan spe-
cialty, tie end around, and varia-
tions.
End Ed McNeill will he back
for the first time since the Pur-
due game to handle one of the
flanks on Michigan's offense.
This completes the Michigan
team which, if everything goes
all right, will be ready to the
man to take the field against
Minnesota Saturday
The jayvee team spent the
greater part of the afternoon run-
ning off Minnesota's plays against
a defensive Varsity team. Line
plays followed the old routine of
"get up and try amain."
VARIABLE DEFENSIVE units
with Elliott, Teninga, Derricotte.
Koceski, Ortmann, and Van Sum-
mern getting in backfield time.
BobErben spelled off center Dan-
ny Dworsky in the defensive
grooming.
Line play was as quick and
agressive as the backfield. It was a
good, hard practice, meaning, nat-
urally, very effective.

GENE DERRICOTTE
... returns to action

Backfield ,t, sFlas,
Deception ina Scrimage
Derricotte's Return to Wolverine Lineup
Bolsters Defense for 'Brown Jug' Battle

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mages the Varsity opened holes
in the jayvee line and sent a
spearhead of speedy blocking
backs out ahead of the hard driv-
ing ball carrier.
Pete Elliott and Bill Bartlett
shovelled the ball to Tom Peter-
son and Ralph Straffon, who
whipped through wide holes torn
by the offensive linemen at cen-
ter and tackle.
Quick Gene Derricotte was back
in the Varsity lineup with his leg
still wrapped in protecting ban-
dages. He ran through plays in

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