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October 17, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THlE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBE1t 17, mg

I'

SUNDAY. OCTOBF~Th 1~. l~4t

r

Judge To Talk
At Fund Drive
KickoffDinner
Red Feather Canvass
Starts Tomorrow
Federal=Judge Frank A. Picard
of Detroit will be the guest speaker
at the local Community Fund
Drive's "kick-ogf dinner" tomor-
row in the Union.
The campaign begins tomorrow
and ends Oct. 29.
*, * *
ANN ARBOR campaign workers
will aim for a total of $159,600, of
which University personnel and
students will be asked to provide
$25,000, according to Prof. John
Arthos of the English department,
who is chairman of the University
campaign.
More than 400 voluntter
workers will hear Judge Picard
at the dinner. He has been ac-
tive in organizing Community
Chests througbout the coun-
try.
Community Chest agencies in
Ann Arbor give several services to
the student body, especially mar-
ried students, Prof. Arthos said.
Among organizations that use the
funds are the Children's Aid So-
ciety, Public Health Nursing As-
sociation, the Perry Nursery
Nursery School and Dunbar Cen-
ter.
All these agencies have been hit
by increased costs and a fifteen
per cent in crease over last year's
quota will be necessary to main-
tain the present leven of services
Prof. Arthos explained.
Campu~s
Cal endar
EVENTS TODAY
Social Research Group - Dr.
Leon Festinger will discuss
"Theory Development and Pro-
gram Planning in Social Commun-
ication," 7:30 p.m., Library Rm.,
Lane Hall.
EVENTS TOMORROW
Hiawatha Club - Meeting, stu-
dents from the Upper Peninsula,
7:30 p.m., Rm. 3G, Union.
NSA Committee-Discussion of
report to Student Legislature, 4
p.m., Union.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Freshmen Get the Neck of the Chicken

Daily-Heggem
WHAT'S IN A LEAF?-Elaine Lueck, '51, and Don Ennis, '51,
ponder the question as they seek a significant interpretation of
the ordinary. As part of a Fine Arts I exercise, they will incor-
porate the leaf design in an overall pattern. The course, initi-
ated on campus this semester, attempts to "create expression" in
students without a background in art. The course is open to all
students except those in the architecture school.
* *. *' *

Freshmen still get it in the neck.
As long as love has kept the
world spinning and profs have
kept scholars chinning, the eter-
nal 'new guy' gets the short end
of the paddle, the neck of the
chicken or what have you}
HORDES OF IRATE upper-
classmen crashed through a
locked door to capture and sub-
jugate a lonely freshman at Cor-
nell. In the ensuing melee, the
victim received a partial head
shave and a cut lip, the Cornell
Daily Sun reported.
Needless to say, the assailants
turned out to be sophomores.
*. * *
A QUICK TRIP to the drink
was the fate of one freshman at
the University of Miami, the Mi-
ami Hurrican said.
Working on a "dunk for a dink"
basis, the sophomores are plan-
ning to really discipline those who
are one rung down the ladder of
education. Football players are be-
ing recruited to do the dunking on
a mass-production basis with 10
or 20 underclassmen 'participat-
ing' at a time.
MOOT COURT, "most honor-
able function" at the University of
Colorado, picks on only the frosh
women who violate sacred tradi-
tion by tripping on tender green
shoots, appearing without the
customary head-furniture, or toss-
ing around smoke rings without
official permission.
According to Silver and Goad,
the coeds must-mong other
things-conduct a "Milk-Party'
duly accompanied with temperate
liquid and words.
SHMOOS-Those delicious lit-
tle creatures-have swept rapidly
from one college campus to an-
other.

Most recent indication of their
popularity was the victory of the
Shmoo Party in a Ball State
Teachers College election.
The newly-formed group swept
all the offices of the sophomore
class with the exception of secre-
tary.
* * *
TRYOUTS CAN be difficult
people to round up-but not for
the Harvard Crimson.
In the second round of their
campaign, Crimson editors an-
nounced a meeting for a recent
night. - They said the affair
would be just a "get -together." A
picture besides the article showed
two Crimsonites nursing suds
buckets.
Round one in their campaign
was more subtle:

Sally Rand, handsomely clad in
the finest ladies wristwatch .avail-
able, exhibited several reasons for
her success as an entertainer.
Again, in the article, no mention
of the picture was made.
* * *
FLASH: 'Twirp Season,' (The
Woman Is Requested to Pay) has
hit Western Michigan College.
The gag, which originated with
a cartoonist who creates a comic
character called "Freckles," mnean3
that coeds furnish the cokes, make
th'e dates and prove that chivalry
is not dead yet.
Failure to comply with the cus-
tom results in two cent fines for
females.
Seniors get your mug in the
Michiganenslan

Iii --- ---------~-~=-- -- - ________________

Daily-Heggem
LEG ART-Elaine Schemanske, '51, and Bob Watson, '51, study a
group of pin-ups produced by Fine Arts I students.

Art Students Create Pin-Up Girls

ART CINEMA LEAGUE and
LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
P roset
THE DARK NIGHT
OF THE MAYAS
(LA NOCHE DE LOS MAYAS)

Pin-up girls have worked their
way into the University curriculum
tris semester-in a refined and
artistic way.
They're part of the course of
study of a new class-Fine Arts 1.
The course is designed to offer
the student who has had no for-
mal art experience an idea of the
elementary steps in creating works
of art. Education, lit school, Bus.
Ad. students-any school except
architecture-are taking it. Few
have had any previous art work.
Among the problems students
have worked on are those dealing
with finger, hands, leaves and-
pin-ups.
According to Prof. J. D. Pren-
dergast, who, together with Prof.
Gerome Kamrowski, is in charge
of the studios, the students were
encouraged to take these subjects
and put them in another form.
They were encouraged to use these
materials to express themselves.
In her project, Anita Saidel, '50,
interpreted the pin-up girl poet-
ically. She arranged the parts of
the girl's body in a loose, dis-
jointed mass, noteworthy for its
artistic and rhythmic flow.

Mrs. Elain Lueck, '51, filled in
an outline of a pin-up girl with
picturesof waraatrocities. She felt
the girl symbolized the beauty in
life, while pictures of human trag-
edies were directly contrasted to
this conceptiaon.
Doris Smith, '50, thought of the
pin-up girl as a jewel. Her inter-
pretationrincluded many hands
adorned with jewels, and a giant
emerald for the pin-up's waist.
Mrs. Marilyn Loy, '51, whose
work may be seen in the fore-
ground of the picture to the right,
Student Wins Award
University senior Robert G. Ox-
engen, of Reading, has received
the $300 Borden Scholarship
Award, Prof. C. H. Stocking, act-
ing director of the pharmacy col-
lege, has announced.
The Award is an annual prize
offered in each of 15 colleges of
pharmacy 'throughout the country
by the Borden Foundation, Prof.
Stocking explained.
It goes to the undergraduate
with the highest average for the
first three years.

-

i

felt that the most important fea-
ture of a pin-up girl was her eyes.
"So much can be told through the
eyes," she said. She arranged mul-
tiple pairs of eyes in a semi-cir-
cular fashion.
Miss Smith, and Mrs. Loy who
are education majors said that
they were sure the course would
help them in their primary school
teaching.
"The course makes you think
about things and correlate many
subjects that you previously had
neglected.
"Fine arts is a pleasant diver-
sion-and the lessons we're learn-
ing will always be useful," Miss
Saidel said.
All the students agreed that the
course has succeeded in stimulat-
ing their interest in the arts.
And Prof. Prendergast said that
the course is very exciting to
teach. Students are so alert and
quick because they do not have
preconceived ideas. So they can
take a stimulus and work it but
are not dependent on teaching,
he said.
The purpose of the course, he
said, is to create expression in

the students. "People who are
creative areamade active, and ac-
tive people are made creative."
The course, besides stimulating
an interest in art, has also en-
couraged the students to attend
French and Italian films, as well
as concerts.
"However, an appreciation of
Stan Kenton by classic lovers is
as important as one of Horowitz
for the be-boppers."
Extremely pleased with the re-
sults so far, Prof. Prendergast said
he hoped there would soon be
openings for more students.

ARTURO DE CORDOBA

ESTELA INDA

Spanish Dialogue - English Titles

Tuesday, Wednesday
Admission 50c

Oct. 19, 20
8:30 P.M.

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

I

1 '- X111

0/2

cotltrV,

Bound To Be Better
'49 'Ensian

a

you'II want to be

seen

kA AL

1

COSTUME JEWELRY
Bangly bracelets, gorgeous neck-
laces, clever pins and earrings in
pearl, rhinestone, gold, silver or
semi-precious colored stones.
Just the 'correct costume accents.
f1.00 to $22.95.

For Every Occasion --
Class - Office - Evening
To wear to the game-a warm wool coat
and wool dress or suit. For teas, dances
and Sunday evening dates-pert crepe,
taffeta or satin dresses. In fact
from head to toe costume accents
may be found all one one floor-
under one roof-and at prices that
won't strain the budget.

r/ .
«r ,
..
.tea

in CORDUROY!.
The fabric of the year, lighthearted corduroy
....wonderful to wear, easy to take care of.
There's a high campus rating in these sociable
separates... you're the mixer ... and you'll
want the entire collection as ingredients.
Classic jacket; slim, fly front, fly back skirt;
trim jumper; reversible double-breasted topper .. .
in fire-wagon red, gunmetal gray, olive green,
cocoa brown, tan beige or shocking blue.

SPORTS ROOM - FIRST FLOOR

'
V.
': .,
'1,
t.,
:.
.

Fabric or Leather
GLOVES

Smooth kids and doeskins,
sturdy pigskins and washable
fabrics in white, black, brown or
colors to highlight your ensem-
ble. Shalimar and Hansen gloves.
$1.75 to $8.95.
........
.f/

1
z
1
:

or Taffeta

PURE WOOL COATS
Flared or fitted coats in black or
colors with those little extra touches
that add distinction. Tailored or
fur trim in sizes 9-15,
10-20 and 14%-24%.x
$39.95 to $110.00

Crepe, Faille
DRESSES

N.1

Rustling taffetas, moires and failles,
draped crepes with such flippant
back interest as well as sleek,
shimmering satins. Sizes 9-15. 10-44
and 14% to 24%. $12.95 to $39.95.
WORSTED WOOL SUITS
Menswear worsted tweeds and

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