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October 15, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

iTHE~ MIT! ,AN-Y

" RYDAY. OCTORM 1 T.,1140

_

Y EXPERT GIVES ADVICE:
State Constitution Revision Plan Offered

A possible solution to difficul-
s in modernizing the Michigan
ate constitution has been sug-
sted by Claude R. Tliarp re-
irch assistant in -the Univer-I
y's Bureau of Government.
The "more expedient method"
the naming of a commission
her by the governor or the
:islature, to study the consti-
tion and to suggest possible
anges to the voters of the
tte.

ADVANTAGES
i over the two
procedures-the
Convention and

of this
more fa-
Constitu-
piecemeal

iar
ial

tadio Course
o Be Given
The Ann Arbor Evening School
,s announced that students can
.11 sign up for its radio produc-
in course.
Starting with the basic organi-
tion of the radio industry, it
vers radio writing, directing,
ws, special features and tele-
sion.
The classes are conducted by
y Berry, Continuity Director of
e ABC affiliate in Ann Arbor.
rry has indicated that the
purse will emphasize the practi-
I approach to radio, and will be
ghlighted by visits to local
oadcasting stations.
Applicants may register for the
urse at 7:30 p.m. any day at
e Ann Arbor High School. The
ass meets at 7:30 p.m. every
tursday,.and lasts for two hours.

Pmendments-become more ap-
parent when compared to the re-
sults of the past hundred years of
experience.
The Gonstitutional Conven-
tion has had but indifferent suc-
cess. Authorization by the leg-
islature for permission to place
the question of the Convention
on the ballot has been extremely
difficult to obtain in the past.
And of ' the ten times permis-
sion has been granted, only
twice has the public voted for
the formation of a convention.
Another difficulty to the Con-
vention is in the length of time
required to call it and then sub-
mit a revised draft to the voters.
The three and a half years; re-
piuired to complete the whole proc-
ess are usually more than enough
to discourage the governor and
leaders of the Legislature, with
only two year terms of office,
from undertaking any program of
revision.
* * *
BUT IF THE voters of Michi-
gan have seemed loath to allow
complete revision of the Consti-
tution, they have not hesitated to
approve numerous amendments.
Since 1908, 44 amendments out
of 95 proposals have been adopted.
"Many of the amendments -
were proposed and adopted
within a period of six to nine
months," Tharp pointed out.
"Much of the information of
the issues involved reached the
public through groups which
were to be directly benefitted
by the change .. and frequent-
ly passed without study to real-
ize the long range effect."
Many of the difficulties of the

above methods would be avoided
by Tharp's proposed commission.
*k* .,
THE IDEA of a commission is not
completely new. In 1938 the gov-
ernor appointed the Commission
f Reform and Modernization of
Government to study "the means
and methods whereby changes
may be made in the procedure and
structure of state government."
In 1941, the governor ap-
pointed the Constitutional Re-
vision. Study Commission which
was to serve as a guide h the
voters of Michigan on the ques-
tion of whether a constitutional
convention should be called by
the electorate in 1943.
The commission generally did
not favor any constitutional
changes during the war years, but
found at least 68 changes which
were desirable. Unfortunately its
findings became available only a
few months prior to the election
and although the commission
voted 17 to 6 in favor of the con-
vention, the proposal was de-
feated.
THE value of the commission lies
in its ability to "make a thorough
study of the constitution as a
whole and to recommend a series
of amendments to be presented to
the voters."
A co-ordinated program, amply
publicized will result in the or-
ganization of a modern and
streamlined constitution, designed
to do its work speedily and well.
Eye Operation
Improved by
VU' Research
Cataracts of the eye can now be
removed with fewer complications,
thanks to research by University
medical personnel.
Dr. Bruce A. Pralick, chairman
of the Department of Ophthal-
mology of the Medical School, re-
sorted that an extremely fine ab-
sorbent catgut suture for closing
incisions has been used success-
fully in 500 cataract operations at
University Hospital.
* * *
WITH A technicolor movie, Dr.
Fralick demonstrated use of the
new suture before the American
Academy of Ophthalmologists and
Otarolaryngologists.
"Previously silk sutures were
used," Dr. Fraliek said. "The
silk threads had to be removed
after the incision had healed.
This sometimes led to post-op-
erative complications."
He said that the new-type su-
ture were possible because of im-
proved materials. Old-type cat-
gut sutures were not fine, enough
for use in delicate eye operations
and suitable needles were not
available.
New sutures and needles used
at University Hospital are not as
yet on the general market, he said.
An Adventure in
Good Smokina

J

T 1\T / t

AiUJxirN :
For your dancing pleasure
NEW BOOKING DATES
The
MACK FERGUSON TRIO

Wildcats Will
Receive Salute
Before Gwte
Band Plans Election
Preview at Halftime
The Northwestern University
Wildcats will be featured in the
pre-game ceremonies to be pre-
sented by the Michigan Marching
Band at tomorrow's game.
Spectators will also enjoy the
112 piece Northwestern band,
which will present its own pro-
grams before the game and during
the halftime period.
* * *
BETWEEN HALVES the Michi-
gan Band will entertain football
fans with a preview of the sea-
son's biggest contest, the Novem-
ber Presidential election. Details
as to what the Northwestern
Band will do at half-time are not
known as yet.
At half time the band will
form a huge map of the United
States to the tune of "Yankee
Doodle" and "America the
Beautiful." Maps of Missouri
and Michigan will represent the
campaign activities of native
sons Truman and Dewey.
The candidates will then receive
musical salutes in the form of the
"Missouri Waltz" and "Sidewalks
of New York." A large question
mark will be formed around a
figure of the Capitol, as the band
appropriately plays "Who?"
TO SYMBOLIZE the fact that
all Americans are united, the band
will form the federal shield, com-
plete with red and white stripes,
and bring the program to a col-
orful close with the stirring "Stars
and Stripes Forever."
Film Features
French Stars
"A Mae West who really means
it," alias "Jenny Lamour," alias
Miss Suzy Delair, was viewed yes-
terday at a sneak preview of the
French film "Jenny Lamour" in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Miss Delair appears to have the
qualifying characteristics the ad-
vertisements have claimed, as well
as being vivacious and pouty, but
her scenes number considerably
less than those of her co-star,
Louis Jouvet.
The running time of the winner
of the Grand Prix International
is well over that of the average
American film.
"Jenny" will be shown at 8:30
p.m. today and tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
Near sellouts are expected both
nights, according to Norman Rap-
paport, Manager of the Art Cin-
ema League, which is co-sponsor-
ing the picture with the Associa-
tion of Independent Men.
The best Sports features in
'Ensian.
Save
and
Earn
2% Current Rate
Savings insured to $5,000. Any
amount opens your acount,
ANN ARBOR

FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSN.
116 N. Fourth Avenue
Opposite the Assets Over
Court House $11,000,000

ASSOCIATED PRESS

OSCARAK ORK UEKGM A N - Ingrid Bergman and
Rex Harrison, English movie actor, have a drink at a Paris
reception in Miss Bergman's honor after she was awarded the
French Oscar as the best foreign actress.

SN U G F I T - Joke Van Zwienen, 7, gets fitted for wooden
slaops by her father who makes them at Lekkerkerk, Holland.
,Such shoes are in demand because of a leather shortage.

BASS.
2-4183

. . .PIANO ... GUITAR
LEAVE DETAILS

CALL

...

:.

A CHECK LIST OF
CHAMBER MUSIC
ON
COLUMBIA RECOIDS
NOW IN STOCK
BEETHOVEN
Quintet in C Major
Quartets No. 1*, 4", 6", 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 , 16,
Grand Fugue
BLOCH
Quartet No. 1
BRAHMS
Trio in C Major (Op. 87)
DEBUSSY
Quartet in G Minor*
DVORAK
Quartet No. 3
FAURE
Piano Quartet
FRANCK
Piano Quintet
HAYDN
Quartets Op. 20, No. 5; Op. 74, No. 3 (Horseman)*;
Op. 76, No. 3 (Emperor); Op. 76, No. 5
MENDELSSOHN
Quartet No. 3 (Op. 44, No. 1)
MOZART
Clarinet Quintet, Quintet in C Major (K. 515)',
Quintet in D Major (K. 593)
Quartet for Oboe and Strings, Piano Quartets No. 1o,
2*; String Quartets No. 14, 15, 16, 18
PROKOFI EV
Quartet Op. 50
RAVEL
Quartet in F
SCHUBERT
Quintet in C Major
SCHUMANN
Piano Quintet
Quartet No. 1 in A Minor
SHOSTAKOVITCH
Quintet Op. 57
Quartet Op. 49
SMETANA
Quartet No. 1 (aus meinem Leben)
TCHAIKOVSKY
Quartet in D Major, Op. II
Also available on Columbia LP Records
The above list is an indication of the wealth of fine
recordings in the Columbia Catalogue and the
extent of our Columbia stock. We cordi-

A CT R ESS - Film Actress
HedyS6Lamarr attends - benefit
show of United Nations Appeal
for Children at a Parts circus.

C 0 1 N C I D E N C E - These mothers of the same name never had m't until they found them-
selves in the same room after giving birth to girls less than four hours apart at Mills Community
IHospital, Towanda, Pa. Left: Mrs. Paul McNeal of West Franklin, Pa., with Nancy Jean. Right:
Mrs. Paul McNeal of %Vysox, Pa., with Linda Diane. For years they have lived onfy 8 miles apart.

HOLIDAY ALSO COMES
IN A 16 OZ. HUMIDOR
LARUS & BROTHER COMPANY
Richmond, Virginia

____ _ - _ i

ilkI

.90-0-fduh beI
The O' Perfesser recommends
WATCH, CLOCK, CHRONOGRAPH
REPAIRS
at
VETERANS' WATCH REPAIR SERVICE
ALL WORK DONE BY CERTIFIED CRAFTSMEN
0 STATE DRUG CO., PACKARD AT STATE
* CAMPUS DRUG, S. STATE AT LIBERTY
0 WITHAM DRUG, S. UNIVERSITY at FOREST
* WEST LODGE PX, WILLOW VILLAGE

C A L F - Madelyn Fries holds A T A I R M E N 'S R E S T C A M P-Fishing is popular with fliers and their families vaca-
Holstein-Friesian calf which will tioning at new Tenth Air Force rest camp on Squaw Lake near Bemidji, Minn. Left to right: Capt.
be entered in San Francisco James R. Hight, Omaha; M/Sgt. Bob White, Omaha, and son, Rene, 3; Mrs. ]ight; Mrs. R. Savory
livestock exposition. and Capt. Savory, Mt. Clemens, Mich., and, in foreground, their sons, Ralph, 4,. and Thorald,,'3.

Good
4 I - -

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