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October 14, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX,

THE MiCITN D Alt

r* THT3RSDAY, {)OILERFU14,' x949

HAPPY HOMECOMING:
Authoress Betty Smith
Visits Local Bookstore

By GLORIA GOODSTEIN
There was nothing of the bored
visiting celebrity, but rather a
spirit of happy homecoming about
Betty Smith's appearance at a
local bookstore yesterday after-
noon.
Although the noted author of
"A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" and
"Tomorrow Will Be Better" has
not been in Ann Arbor since 1930,
the ten years she spent here are
very fresh in her mind. Many
townspeople came in to talk with
Miss Smith about mutual friends
and remembered days.
* * *
HER NEXT BOOK is still in the
formative stage, but it will have a
midwestern background. "The
only midwest I know is Ann Ar-
bor," Miss Smith said, "but the
name of the town will not be used,
for practical reasons."
Miss Smith had never before
been out of Brooklyn, when she
came to Michigan in 1920. "I
had a very happy time here, and
I want to recapture those tender,
cheerful years," she said.
As a special student at the Uni-
versity, the authoress studied writ-
ing and won an Avery Hopwood
Award for a one-act play. Her
husband was a law student here
at the same time,

LATER MISS SMITH entered1
the Yale Drama School, where
she wrote some seventy-five one-
act plays, all but three of which
were published. Since 1936 she
has lived in Chapel Hill, where
she is on the faculty of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina as a play
consultant and a special lecturer
on the drama.
To all budding writers, Miss
Smith had this advice: "Write!"
She said that a page a day, writ-
ten faithfully, would soon pro-
vide enough material to work
from. "Live a normal life," she
added. "Do your writing before
nine in the morning, so that
you can live and work like
everyone else."
Her first novel, "A Tree Grows
in Brooklyn," took three years to
complete. She worked on it two
hours a day and spent two of the
three years revising. The book has
now sold over three million copies,
not including sixteen different
foreign language editions, and one
million pocket editions.
"Try to find out why people are
the way they are," Miss Smith ad-
vised. "Don't sit down to write a
message. Write because you love
it, and let the critics argue over
the theme and hidden meanings."

Registrants
Flood Office
of CityClerk
Voters Line Up
To Beat Deadline
A steady flow of last minute
Ann Arbor registrants kept the
City Clerk's Office busy through-
out the day yesterday, right up
until closing time at 8 p.m.
The crowd of would be voters
filing through the lines at the
City Hall, included many Uni-
versity studenis who are eligible
to register in Ann Arbor.
AT TIMES, the line numbered
more than fifty people, who wait-
ed patiently in the halls for their
chance to sign.
City Clerk Fred C. Perry re-
ported that at least four of his
office assistants were at work
signing up the new voters at
all times, and the lines m'oved
smoothly.
Besides the lineup, a steadily
ringing phone kept part of the
staff busy answering questions
about voting requirements and
procedures.
AT 8 P.M., THE City Police
closed the doors and cut off the
lines, but everyone already in line
at that time was permitted to reg-
ister.
Yesterday was the last day for
registering towvote in the Novem-
ber 2 presidential election.
Prof. Kauper To Speak
To 'U' Lawyers Guild
Prof. Paul Kauper of the law
school will discuss the constitu-
tional aspects of federal anti-
lynching legislation at a meeting
of the University chapter of the
National Lawye Guild at 3:15
p.m. Friday in Rm. 3R of the Un-
ion
The Lawyers Guild has opened
the meeting to all interested stu-
dents and faculty members.
Greater than '48-'49 NCN
SOCIAL CHAIRMAN
Looking for a favor for your
Christmas Party that is new,
different, and within your
budget?
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. Univ. Ph. 9353

Note Selling
Has 'Legal'
Precedent
Similar Venture
Started in 1893
Faculty condemnation of the1
commercialized lecture note bus-
iness follows a "legal" precedent
established here 55 years ago.
This may come as a surprise to
Fred Zimmerman and Bill Mena-
cher, founders of the Zimen en-
terprise to mimeograph lecture
notes, but two brothers, in law
vchool, Thomas and Daniel Ed-"
wards started a similar venture
here irr 1893.
THE BROTHERS, who wereI
working their way, started mimeo-
graphing law lecture notes to sup-'
plement an average weekly income
of $15, according to an article in
Publisher's Weekly for July 29;
1944.
After Thomas, the younger
brother, graduated in 1898, their
uncle took over the business as
a sideline to cabinet making, his
regular occupation.
Faculty action, although a little
slower than in this year's episode,
inevitably came in due time. In
1906, after 13 years, the notes were
banned, but the business went on.
Instead of notes the firm started
mimeographing laboratory man-
uals and textbooks. The business
specializing in scientific, scholarly,
and technical books, has expanded
to over $750,000 a year.
Owen Cleary To Speak
To Young Republicans
Owen Cleary, chairman of the
Liquor Control Commission of
Michigan will speak on "Condi-
tions at the Michigan Capital" at
a meeting of the Young Repub-
licans at 7:30 p.m. in the League.
A Notary Public will also be on
hand to authorize absentee ballots.
This will be a regular feature of
the Young Republican meetings
until the close of the elections.

Veterans enrolled in the Uni-
versity this fall may not receive;
their full subsistence until the
week of Nov. 7, according to offi-
cials of the Veterans Administra-
tion.
The first checks will include all
subsistance payments due from
Sept. 20 through the end of Oc-
tober.
Officials pointed out that the
heavy workload the colleges and
the VA face because of large en-
rollments will probably cause the
delay.
MOST STUDENT veterans will
be able to work part-time without
having subsistence allowances re-
duced, a VA press release said to-
day.
Full payments will be made as
long as income from productive
labor does not exceed these
monthly ceilings established by
P. L. 512:1. $210 for a veteran
without dependents; 2. 270 for
a veteran with one dependent;
3. $290 for those with more than
one.
,The Veterans Administration
Branch Office in Columbus will
send prior notice to veterans
whose National Service Life In-
surance term policies expire after
Oct. 8, 1948.
OFFICIALS explained that this
will give the veterans time to
convert their term insurance to a
permanent NSLI plan or renew
their term insurance for an ad-
ditional five years. Renewals may
be made without physical exami-
nation, but at a higher premium
rate based on the veterans' at-
taen~d ave at the time of renewal.
VA stressed that veterans who
plan to renew their term insurance
snould submit their renewal ap-
plication, plus a premium at the
advanced rate, prior to the ex-
piration date of the original pol-
icy.
E. St. Elmo Lewis, nationally
known advertising expert, defines
salesmanship as "the ability to
make people want what they al-
ready need," the World Book En-

Texas Doctors Journey Here
For Week's Medical Course

Thirty-five Texas physicians the use
have come to Ann Arbor for a one-
week course in internal medicine. electroc
Members of the Texas Intern- Men
ists Club organized twenty-four ganiza
years ago, the group has made an Stone
annual one-week trip to a leading profes
medical center for classes and Univer
clinic conferences. facult
"This is the way we keep up versity
with the latest development in wester
our field," Dr. Julian C. Barton, as.
club president, pointed out. Last
* *Walter
THE COURSE, sponsored by ington,
the internal medicine department versity
of the medical school, will discuss next ye

s of radioactive iodine and
cardiogram technique.
mbers of this unique or-
ation include Drs. Charles
and Raymond Gregory,
sors of medicine at the
sity of Texas, and several
y members of Baylor Uni-
,y at Hlouston and South-
n Medical College at Da-
year the group studied at
Reed Hospital in Wash-
and plans to go to the Uni-
of California at Berkeley
ear, Dr. Barton said.

I

THE T

42z

OLD CHUTIST-Walter Mor-
gan, 76 years old, stands in his
parachute harness at Fosston,
Minn. just after he completed a
parachute jump he said was
his lifetime ambition. Morgan,
an ex-farmer and the father of
six children, said he leaped
"to show the kids I could do it."
Art Lecture
To BeGiven
Prof. Kurt Weitzmann of
Princeton University will give an
illustrated lecture on "The Im-
perial Art of Constantinople" at
4:15 p.m. Monday in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Associated with the Archaeolo-
gische Institut des Deutschen
Reiches until he came to this
country in 1934, Prof. Weitzmann
is now a staff member of the De-
partment of Art and Archaeology
and the Institute of Advanced
Study at Princeton.

WHAT WILL IT
DO FOR ME?
Plenty! You will have use for it almost
every month in the year because it com-
bines lightness in weight with great
warmth.
You will wear it during the Fall .
on snappy evenings to come . . . and on
all but the coldest days of winter.
You will use it for town, for country,
for traveling, for driving a car and for
almost every occasion where a coat is
necessary.
There is nothing that will give you
greater pleasure and satisfaction.
$45.00 -$47.50

l , , 1
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THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
300 SOUTH MAIN STREET

Watch for the NCN Baby Contest cyclopedia informs us.

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4

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