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October 10, 1948 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBERS 10, 1948

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

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PAGE SEVEN

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40-0

'RUMORSQ ARE FLYdIN 'r"
'Neill e eleased,
Newhouser to Red Sox

Devas tating''O ene
Shocks Partisan Crowd
(Continued from Page 1)

Iowa Upsets Ohio State
By Capitalizing on Breaks

CLEVELAND-(P)-The rumor
factory was working overtime to-
night at the World Series press
party.
Highly- interesting but uncon-
firmed reports circulated through
the several hundred scribes and
baseball men, big and little.
1-THAT PRINCE HAL NEW-
HOUSER, ace of the Detroit Tig-
er pitching staff and the outstand-
ing left-hander in the business,
has been sold to the Boston Red
Sox. The figure was rumored
round a quarter-million dollars,
most of it to be paid in playing
talent. (If true, the acquisition of
Newhouser might well mean the
1949 pennant for Boston. This
year Newhouser defeated Cleve-
land in the final game of the sea-
son, forcing the Indians into a
pennant playoff with the Red
Sox.)
Billy Evans, general manager of
the Detroit club, however, said:
"THE REPORT IS ABSOLUTE-
LY untrue. Newhouser will be
pitching for- Detroit next year.
I'm not trying to sell players, I'm
trying to buy them." Despite Ev-
ans'- denial, the rumor continued
to circulate.

2. Seve O'Neill will be released
as manager of the Detroit Tigers.
His one-year contract does not
expire until Dec. 31.
3. CASEY STENGEL, manager
of Oakland, Calif., club, champ-
ions of the Pacific coast loop, will
be named manager of the New
York Yankees, replacing "Bucky"
Harris, who was dropped at the
end of the season. Stengel is a
close friend of Del Webb, part
owner of the Yanks, and is well-
liked by General manager George
Weiss.
4. Bill Veeck, sport-shirted pres-
ident of the Cleveland Indians
and recognized as the greatest
promoter in the game, will sever
his connections with the Tribe
shortly after thenWorld Series
ends. Hank Greenberg, second
largest stockholder and former
home run star, will take over as
prexy.
5. The Boston Red Sox have al-
ready traded third baseman John-
ny Pesky to the Washington Sena-
tors for first baseman Mickey
Vernon, with the Red Sox switch-
ing Bill Goodman, flashy rookie,
from first to third base.

Daily-Lmanian
WALLY TENINGA-Joined in parade of Wolverine backfield stars
that rolled over a touted Purdue eleven 40-0, to start Michigan's
defense of its Big Nine title.
Dartmouth Upsets Holy Cross
HANOVER, N.H.--P)-Dartmouth's young Indians rebounded
from their Pennsylvania opening game setback by overwhelming the
Holy Cross Crusaders, 19-6, today before a capacity 15,000 crowd.

bucked through center for two
yards on a beautifully executed
fake shift play to put the Maize
and Blue out ahead, 13-Q.
* * *
IT WAS THE shifty, relentless
deception of halfbacks Ortmann
and Koceski and fullback Peter-
son that had the Purdue tacklers
grasping for air.
As the second quarter opened,
the Orange and Black put on their
only concerted drive of the after-
noon.
Driving down to the Michigan
four yard line en a series of well
executed pass plays from quarter-
back DeMoss to end Bob Peck.
HERE THE brilliant Michigan
line held on downs and the Boiler-
makers only threat was squelched.
Purdue kicked out on the 49
when the Wolverines took over.
The third Michigan score
came near the end of the first
half when Halfback Ortmann
faded back to the Purdue thirty
and tossed a beautiful aerial to
Rifenburg in the end zone for
the score.
The Wolverine outran the sec-
ondary and took the heave skill-
fully over his right shoulder. At
the half the Wolverines led 19-0.
Michigan again kicked off to
open the second half and it ap-
peared as though the Boilermakers
had solved the Maize and Blue of-
fensive as they held on three
series of downs beforethey finally
got started again.
Afternine minutes had elapsed,
Wally Teninga, who had been
playing a fine defensive game all
afternoon intercepted a DeMoss
pass at the mid-field stripe.
On the very next play Ten-
inga, who remained in the line-
up on offensive faded to his own
35 and heaved a long one to
Rifenburg who made a beautiful
fingertip catch on the defenders
five yard line.
From there the Wolverines
pushed over on four downs with
Peterson carrying over for the
score.
ALLIS' KICK was good and
Michigan led 26-0.
That was all the scoring in the
third quarter.
The final two scores came
against a thoroughly demoralized
Purdue eleven that seemed to lose
its fighting spirit.
With substitutes constantly
streaming on to the field everyone
got into the act.

MICHIGAN
Rifenburg
Clark
Holloway
Eoboleski.
Wistert
Tomasi
Sickels
Dworsky
Erben
Farrer
Wilkins
Heneveld
McClelland
Kohl
Wahl
Ohlenroth
McNeill
Allis
Wisniewski
Herschberger
Elliott
Peterson
Bartlett
Palmer
Ortmann
Lentz
Koceski
Teninga
Vansummern
Peterson
Kempthorn
Staffon
First Downs

POS. PURDUE
LE Heck
Jeffery
Bland
LT O'Reilly
Karras
Considine
LG Horvath
Murray
Afflis
Cent Sprang
Carnaghi
RG Gibron
Scallish
Weizer
RT Barbolak
Kalapos
Beletic
RE McCaffrey
Scheer
Sebastian

The first score came early in
the quarter when Teninga, who
had taken over the tailback spot
for the injured Ortmann, dashed
eight yards inside his own right
end after Dick Kempthorn in-
tercepted another DeMoss pass
on the Purdue 30 and ran it
back to the 13.
After Allis kicked successfully,
the Wolverines led 33-0.
Shades of '47,

COLUMBUS, O. -- (P)-Iowa's
Hawkeyes grabbed the breaks to-
day and came off with an upset
14-7 big nine victory over Ohio
State.
It was the Buckeyes' first loss
of the season, and Iowa's first
win over Ohio in six games since
1928.
Coach Eddie Anderson's Hawks,
trailing 7-0, counted twice within
four minutes after the opening of
the second period. And that, for
the 63,394 fans was the ball game.
A 67-yard kick-off return by
halfback Jerry Faske to Ohio
State's 17-yard line set up the first,
Iowa score. Then, coach Wes Fes-
ler's Bucks gave the game away
on the next .kickoff by failing to
realize it was a free ball. Iowa's
John Tedore fell on the ball on
the Ohio 24, andthenHawks scored
four plays later when Tedore fum-
bled and end Bob McKenzie re-
covered in the end zone.
The Buckeyes scored late in the
first period after breaks three
times gave them the ball in Iowa
territory.
MEN O1 MICHIGAN
Be suave, individualistic, and
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Quarterback Pete Perini, for the
second time within minutes, re-
covered a fumble made on Iowa's
19 by Hawkeye quarterback Al Di-
marco.
Fullback Joe Whisler powered
to the four, and scored three plays
later over center. End James
Hague placekicked the extra
point.
Faske, a 19-year-old sophomore
from Brooklyn, . N.Y., quickly
changed the picture, however. He
took the kickoff on his 16, twice
reversed his field and reached the
Ohio 17.
The second quarter opened with
Tedore bulling his way to Ohio's
four yard line for a first down. He
scored on his third crack at the
line, and fullback Ronald Head-
ington's placekick tied the score.
After the kickoff Tedore
pounced on the ball on the Ohio
24 while two Buckeyes watched
it roll around, obviously unaware
that after a kickoff the ball be-
longs to which ever team grabs it
first.
for
FORMAL
RENTALS
All New - All Sizes
See
RABI DEAU-HARRIS.
119 So. Main St. Phone 6924

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Contir4ued from Page 4)
Evangelical and Reformed Guild
will be the guest of the Congrega-
tional-Disciples Guild. Meeting at
ongregational Church, 6 p.m.
Michigan Christian Fellowship.
Meeting, 4:30 p.m., Lane Hall. Rev.
Peter H. Elderveld will speak on
"The Cosmic Cross of Christ."
Westminster Guild. Supper meet-
ing, 5:30 p.m. Followed by panel
discussion on "The Predicament
of Modern Man."
Roger Williams Guild. Supper
and fellowship, 6 p.m. At 7 p.m.
the group will visit St. Mary's
Chapel where Fr. John Bradley
will speak to them.
Congregational-Disciples Guild.
supper at Congregational Church,
3 p.m. Howard Y. McClusky, pro-.
essor of Educational Psychology
will speak on "Campus Related-
iess and the Ecumenical Move-
nent." Members of the Evangeli-
cal and Reformed Guild will be
jguests.
Wesleyan Guild: Rev. H. L. Pic-
erill will speak on "Concerning

a Basic Philosophy," 5:30 p.m.
Supper and fellowship, 6:30 p.m.
Kappa Phi. Rushing tea for all
Methodist and Methodist prefer-
ence girls. 3-5 p.m., Wesleyan
Lounge, Methodist Church.
Gallery Talk, by Prof. James D.
P endergast, on the Newberry
Collecton of Drawings, 3:30 p.m.,
West Gallery, Alumni Memorial
Hall. The public is invited.
U. of M. Hot Record Society:
"Jazz High Lights from 1930 to
1940," 8 p.m., Michigan League
Ballroom. Everyone invited.
Cornino Events
Sociedad Hispanica: Social
hour, 4 to 5 p.m., Mon., Oct. 11,
International Center.
Graduate History Club: Coffee
Hour, 4-5 p.m., Mon., Oct. 11,
Clements Library. All graduate
history students and faculty mem-
bers invited.
United World Federalists: Exec-
utive Meeting, 4:15 p.m., Mon.,
Oct. 11, Michigan Union. Written
committee reports requested at
this meeting.iNextgeneral meet-
ing, Oct. 13, instead1 of Oct. 20.
Delta Sigma Phi: 7 p.m., Mon.,
Michigan Union. All members
from other chapters are invited.

The United Nations Council for
Students will hold its first meet-
ing on Mon., Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m.,
Rackham Bldg. (instead of Michi-
gan Union.) .Prof. Trow will speak
on UNESCO" Meeting is open to
entire student body. Members are
urged to attend.
United World Federalists: Edu-
cation Committee meeting, 7:30
p.m., Oct. 11, Michigan League.
Come prepared to take notes.
IZFA: Tuesday study group will
meet Mon., Oct. 11, 7:45 p.m., Rm.
3K; Michigan Union.
Wednesday study group will
meet Oct. 13, 7:45 p.m., Rm. 3-M,
Michigan Union.
Association of U. of M. Scien-
tists: Mon., Oct. 11, 8 p.m., West
Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Dr. Edwin Moise will lead a dis-
cussion on government procedures
in investigating loyalty of scien-
tists. The public is invited.
The Michigan Actuarial Club,
business meeting to elect new
Council members Tues., 4:10 p.m.,
Rm. 3010 Angell Hall.
U of M Rifle Team. Meeting,
ROTC range, 7 p.m., Tues., Oct.
12.
Quarterdeck Society: Meeting,
7:30 p.m., Tues.,Oct. 12, Rm. 3A,

Michigan Union. Movies will be
shown.
Student Chapter of the Ameri-
can Society of Civil Engineers.
Tues., Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3
k-1-m, Michigan Union. Mr. H. L.
Conrad, president of Christman
Co., Builders, Lansing, Mich., will
talk on "The New Construction
Option." All civil engineering stu-
dents and faculty members are
urged to attend.
IFC House Presidents. Meeting
Tues., Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3c,
IFC Office, Michigan Union.
Wallace Progressives. Open meet-
ing, 7:30 p.m., Tues., Michigan
League. Report on YPA Conven-
tion and discussion of the Diag
situation.
Toledo Club. Meeting, Tues., at
Michigan League, 7:30 p.m. All
Toledoans invited. Discussion of
social plans for the fall.
Square dancing class sponsored
by the Graduate Outing Club at
WAB Tues., Oct. 12, 8 p.m. Admis-
sion 40c, everyone welcome.
Undergraduate Psychological So-
ciety: Dr. Donald G. Marquis,
chairman of the Department of
Psychology, will speak about "Vo-
cational Opportunities in Psy-
chology" at 7:30 p.m., Wed., Oct.
13, Rooms 3-K, L and M, Michigan
Union.

QB
Ill
RH
FB

DeMoss
Gorgal
Hartman
Punzelt
Szulborski
Schiidt
Gorgal
Adams
Manich
Samsen
Agnew
Milito
Kerestes
MICII. PUR.
15 12

Plan to

Net yards gained rushing 164
Forward passes attempted 15
Forward passes completed 10
Yards forward passing 171
Forwards intercepted by 3
Yards gained run-back
Interceptions 18
Punting average 37.2
Total yards, all kicks
returned 14-
Opponent Fumbles recov'd 2
Yards lost by penalties 5

36
22
9
122
0
0
37.5
122
1
0

Hold Your
DANCES &
DINNERS
at the
AMERICAN LEGION
1035 S. Main Home
Phone 6141
For Information
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Michigan.......13 6
Purdue....... ..0 0

7
0

14-40
0- 0

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