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October 03, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

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THE MWTTTETCA DfAILY

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COLLEGE RWUNDUP:
Students Submerged Under 'Routine'

*Throughout the nation this
week college students settled down
to academic routine, getting to
know themt roommates and look-
ing back at a hectic nightmare of
enrollment, buying books and re-
discovering old friends.
All endured hours of waiting,
some were stuck with bad class
schedules, but all found that life
could be humorous too.
* * *
EXCITED FRESHMEN at the
University of Indiana rushed to
the fire alarm box late one evening
when they saw billowing smoke
and a red glare blotting out their
view of a Bloomington eatery, the
Indiana Daily Student said.
Worldly upperclassmen tiredly
explained to assembled greenhorns
and fire-eaters that the manage-
ment, did that every night-the
smoke is a fly-killer they spray
the place with and the red glare
says "GOOD FOOD."
* * *
REPORTERS for the Daily Cal-1
ifornian, at the University of Cali-

fornia, made life on campus ex-
citing recently with a snail race.
The snail won easily over a fast-
moving rival-a student in a book-
store line.
* * *
MALE STUDENTS complained
bitterly to the Detroit Collegian at
Wayne University when they
found that the one-way-view win-
dows in their lavatories had been
inserted wrong-side to.
They said they couldn't look

i

yout.

* * *

State University began handing
out five-dollar bills with the wild
abandon of a Forty-Niner struck
it rich.
For students needing an extra
five to tide them over the weekend,
his "Lettuce Box" is the place to
go, according to the OSU Lantern.
All you have to do is give your
name and. address, promise to re-
turn the flyer (without interest)
within a week and get out your
wallet.
* * *
BUT SOME PLACES there was
no adjustment-to anything, ac-
cording to reports from the Har-
vard Crimson:
"The Student Apathy League,
Harvard's only side-of-the-road
political organization, came sleep-
walking into its second term yes-
terday. Boasting no boosters, so-
licitors, or lapel snatchers, the
Apathy League holds together its
3,000 odd members by the sheer
force of inertia."
"I will do nothing," the presi-
dent commented.

GAIN FROM TULANE:
New Gilbert-Sullivan Leader
Experieniced in Choral Work
Prof. Maynard Klein, new director of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society, has had a very wide range of experiences with various types
of choral and orchestral music.
Before coming to the University as associate professor of choral
music and director of University choirs, Klein served as director
of university choral groups at Newcomb College of Tulane University
for 14 years.
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN operas are a tradition at Newcomb,
where they have been presented regularly for a quarter of a century,
and it was at Newcomb that Klein became experienced in the pro-
duction of these masterpieces of tuneful satire.
In addition to his work in New Orleans, Prof. Klein has been
directing Gilbert and Sullivan operas at the Interlochen Music Camp
for the past five years, where he has been director of choral groups.
COMMENTING UPON the local musical scene, Mr. Klein stated
that he is "very excited about the fund of talent and the great diversity
of musical opportunities to be found here."
"Yeoman of the Guard," the next offering of the local Gilbert
and Sullivan group, was described by Mr. Klein as a "timely
and difficult production." "Yeoman" has been somewhat less
popular than other Gilbert and Sullivan operas largely because
of its difficulty, according to Mr. Klein.

AND WITH THE readjustments
for the fall, certain matters had
to be straightened out:
University of California and
St. Mary's College signed a "peace
pact" which would limit all pre-
game 'raiding' to the Big C on the
California campus and the water
tank on the St. Mary's campus,
the Daily Californian said.
* * *
OTHER readjustments were fl-
nancial:
A local businessman at Ohio

DIAMONDS
of quality
There is a big difference
in dianonds.
We invite you to see
our display.
HALLER'S
Jewelers
717 North University

SOVIET HUDDLE-Andrei Vishinsky and Ukrainian Foreign
Minister Dmitri Z. Manuilsky confer after Russia demanded
UN ban of atom bomb yesterday.

Ih

---1

Campus Calendar

Events Today
UNITED WORLD FEDERAL-
ISTS-Chester Byrns, formerly of
George Washington University,
will lead discussion on "Why
World Federation Now," 7:30 p.m.,
U~nion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSO-
CIATION MARRIED GROUP -
8:00 p.m.
WESTMINSTER GUILD -
Wyn Price and Will Kyselka will
speak on "One World" at supper
meeting, 5:30 p.m., Presbyterian
Church.

AT THE MICHIGAN-"Street
With No Name," 1:30, 3:30, 5:30,
7:30, 9:30.
AT THE STATE-"Romance on
the High Seas," 1, 3, 5, 7, 9.
Events Tomorrow

New Population
Figures Issued
WASHINGTON - UP) - Cali-
fornia has joined New York and
Pennsylvania in the 10,000,000
population class, the Census Bu-
reau reported.
Releasing provisional estimates
for the U. S. as of July 1, 1948, the
bureau said 31.1 per cent of Cali-
fornia's 10,031,000 had been gained
since 1940, when the last official
census was taken.
Total population for the coun-
try as of July 1 is estimated to be
146,114,000, as compared with
131,669,275 in 1940. The gain is 11
per cent.

La petite causette-3:30
League.
Events Tuesday

p.m.,I

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS-Elec-
tion of officers, group singing,
talk on "La position critique de la
France," by Prof. Charles Koella,
8 p.m., Rm. 305, Union.

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