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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

______________________________ Tt1-RICTI-ANDAtY

F}3, Trr ', F R Jr It

Two New Art, ,
Exhibitions G
Now onViewl

TOP OF YOUR DIAL: Browmcci qui. g
AlS udent Radio WVor-k hop IpoIj b; 1t ih
Set for Initial IPerformut i ie E p(4ry lmedl

Washington UMT Convention
DeelaredVictory for Liberals

Works by Faculty,
SStudentsDisplayed
Two art exhibitions, showing
work by both students and pro-
fessors, can currently be seen un-
der the sponsorship of the School
of Architecture.
In the Architecture Building it-
self a group of architectural draw-
ings and sketches prepared by
students at the University of Min-
nesota is on view. This is the
second in the series of intercol-
legiate exchange exhibits spon-
sored by the student chapter of
the American Institute of Archi-
tects
Art Exchange
Under the auspices of this cam-
pus organization, a representative
showing of work by Michigan stu-
dents was sent to Minnesota. Al-
though the Gophers' exhibit con-
tains only architectural material,
the Michigan collection gives an
over-all picture of the work being
done in the Architectural School.
Included are drawings from class-
es in sketching, oil painting, inter-
ior decoration and industrial de-
sign.
Faculty Art
In the mezzanine of Rackham
Building hangs the work of six
faculty members of the Archi-
tecture School. The exhibit in-
cludes oil paintings and water
colors as well as photographs.
The work of Pofessor4 Pren-
dergast and LaMore on view there
is generally semi-abstract in ap-
proach and may be considered as
surrealistic. On the other hand
the paintings of instructors Rich-
ard Wilt and Paul Jones are of
the expressionistic school.
The. other two exhibitors °are
Prof. David Reider and Frank Cas-,
sandra, instructor. Mr. Cassan-
dra, with long experience in the
execution of murals is showing a
group of his paintings and mural
studies, reduced to exhibition hall
size. Prof. Reider is represented
by photographs interesting for
their textural and pattern values.
Al.A's...
(Continued from Page 1)
Saul Kushner, Thomas D. Kowal-
ski, Marjorie Lamb, Jeanne Lange,
Orley Law, Norma Levy, William
Louisell, Marvin J. Lubeck and
Alla Mandelstamm.
Perfect records were also made
by Mary Louise Manley, Maxine
Marcus, William Masters, Apos-
tel Millis, Robert Mooney, Ran-
dall Nelson, Barbara Newman,
Edward Norbeck, Richard Park,
Douglas Parker, Claudius Pendill,
Edith Pinkus, Margaret Prine,
Richard Rappley, Donald Roberts,
Jay Sanford and Thomas Schat-
ski.
The list concluded with Eldon
Schmidt, James Seward, Lewis
Shenker, Peter Siegel, Doris Si-
lep, Vance Simonds, Willis Snell,
Eileen Stanlis, Alonzo Stoddard,
Norman Weiner, William Wie-
gand, Sarah A. Wilcox, Douglas
Woodward and Abraham Zold.
In the architecture' college, all
A's were recorded by Po Hu, Don-
ald Pitz, and Leonard Siegel,
while Margaret Herrick and Nor-
man Miller achieved the same re-
sults in the education school.
Albert Smith, Seibert Sproull,
and Richard Bonar Starrak up-
held the prestige of the forestry
school with their all-A record
last term.
In the schools of music and
public health, Hugh Hitchcock
and Ena Maude Morris, respec-
tively, were the only persons to
achieve the all-A goal.
Lecture ...

(Continued from Page 1)
constitutional that we have little
precedent to go on. No committee
before ever dared ask such ques-
tions."
"Reaction after World War I
was not as prolonged as it is to-
day because conservatives have
not yet realized that their ownlib-
erties are at stake."
Cited For Gontempt
Kenny's defendants were cited
for contempt because they refused
to answer two questions.
1. Are you a member of the
Screen Writers Guild?
2. Are you now or have you ever
been a member of the Commu-
nist Party?
"Each of our major parties,"
Kenny insisted, "is trying to out-
do the other to st'pport civil lib-
erties and simultaneously deny
them."
Kenny called on Law students to
join the "positive lawyers," fight-
ing for rights in courts, rather
than the "negatives" who merely
advise on whether something is
legal or not.

By MARY STEN
Tc all-st de m hilan Radio
Workshor> will take to WIlRV's
air~~esthi, weekend.
The Workshop, a "laboratory"
t> try out new broadcasting tech-

Revamped

0 0 0

HENRY NOEL, CITIZEN OF THE WORLD-henry Noel, 24-year-
old former Harvard University student of Princeton, N.J., reads a
newspaper at his home in Kassel, Germany, after renouncing his
U.S. citizenship to take up life as an ordinary laborer in Germany.
In a prepared statement to U.S. Military Government officials,
Noel said his decision to become a man without a country was
not motivated by any "personal dislike" for the United States,
its people or its policies.
HAMS IN A HUDDLE:
West Quad Radio Club Opens
SpringSemester Activities
<t>__ _

(Continued from Page 1)
ed on the front page with lots of
fine pictures.
Usage of the word "brass" to
refer to officers is even now for-
bidden.
But the old B-Bag, letters to the
editor column where practically
any complaint can be registered,
still goes on.
Of late, with the advent in mass
of the dependent, the column has
degerenated into a battle ground
between the GIs and the depen-
dents.
Why - don't - the - dependents -
go-home queries are equally
matched with why-aren't-the-
GIs-more-polite letters.
A crowded GI bus I boarded in
Frankfurt after a tasty lunch of
hot dogs and beans in the tran-
sient mess hall became as silent as
a morgue when this conversation
between two American wives was
overheard: "My steak for tonight's
dinner was sitting on the stove
when Fido jumped up and grabbed
it. That nasty old dog ate it all
up, too.",
The letters poured in.
Actually the presence of the de-
pendent in Germany is quite a sta-
bilizing force and most complaints
are just the result of a natural
tendency for soldiers to beef.
Full-blown and mature The
Stars and Stripes is still doing t;e
top-notch job it did during the
war serving the combat soldier.
(Next: The German Outlook)

wvi 11( :liead 6:lt ~ : pI)li. I
tIno ll km ;,id t:! 4t 10 .") p . over ll undtllw
uVul' WI 1V. All awtors aii oun '
ers, direc~tors writers and produn-
ers of the two fifteen- mimitue
shows are students in Garnet ,R.
Garrison's and T. C. Battin's radio i
classes.1
"Journal of the Air" Featured 1
"Michigan Journal of the Air,"
the first program, will feiiture
weekly topics in the news. fea-
ture stories and interviews. Anj
analysis of the current price drop
by University psychologists Har-{
old Guetzkow, Burton D. Thuia.
Edmund F. Walker, and Daniel
Katz will be broadcast.f
Star shot-putter Charlie Fon-1
ville will also be interviewed. 1
The cast includes Don Kleck-
ner, Charles Floyd, Ed Baker, Jim
Lee, W. L. Deamt Helen Currie
and John Carroll.
Directed by John Carroll this
week, the show was' written by
Dick Maloy and Myron Marks. t
Second Program Sunday
The radio workshop's second
program at 10:45 p.m. Sunday1
will broadcast the first in a series1
of dramatic plays. Sunday's opus,
entitled "Today," is a tale of an
almost-perfect murder. It was
written by Traverse DuVall. John
Carroll and Jim Lynch comprise
the cast, with Jim Schiavone di-
recting.
Later in the semester, the stu_
dents plan to try out television
before the mikes of WWJ-TV
in Detroit. But first they'll ex-
periment with the local workshop,
shows-to master the practical
"know-how" of modern broad-
casting.
F
1 do my week's wash
in half an hour!
That's all it takes a t iew
new Half-flour Laandry
You wash, rinse and dan pi
dry clothes automxatically.
Leo them in Westinghouse
Laundromats. Get clothes
sparkling clean.

ui 'a u'wt paie''. and to an
t i . L O 11r i g &xminlce.
a ciah'd ::ist('iday.
h d id u aviai Nie-
Ill ss, n~ 1(1 has been gin in -
1: a Jle 'u dc'tion 1 the
Prodast i_ Service by the
1Board of Icnt s, mnad' the an-
of lnformiation Services, is chair-
?1an 1 I he' new';71on-w,1 ht'. Prof.
\ adf t in f the
Bt'_ dcjst 11i S8cr ri. t: Ch1arles A.
- 1her. diri 0or of the Extension
e'vica; Charle: L. Janilson, pro-
iC. or >.i'business policy; Prof.
1_lLi enegof the Englishi
(eu'.!tn : and Dean Earl V.
Morn oR hO tSchool of Music, are
2oli:ies that die committee for-
mulat s will be considered by the
Unix'e'sitn exiclix'e committee.
Broadcasting SCrvi'Ce activities
at, ircscnt include radio programs
a'ied over several commercial
stations from studios in Angell
Hall. New studios are now being
built in the General Service
Building.
POllTAI3LE
TYPE WitITIERS
IN STOCK
Coronas - Underwoods
Remingtons
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 South 4th Ave.

VDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
of two interpretative articles by Daily
rt-imrters present at the UNT confer-
ne in Washington, D.C., Iast week-
Iy PAT JAMES
and DON McNEIL
The Vashington Universal Mili-
tary Training meeting was a vie-
toi y for liberal organizations who
attended undaunted by the label
of "Communist-inspired."
It was a victory not only over
those who shunned the meeting
but over the Communists who at-
tended.
Religious groups, people back-
ing Brig. Gen. H. C. Holdridge for
the Democratic party presidential
candidacy, students supporting
Wallace, and the Communist ele-
ment were a motley group to
gather as they did.
Outside issues Suppressed
It is to the credit of the leftists
and conservatives that outside is-
sues did not gain control of the
assembly.
Not necessarily Marxian in na-
ture, the extra-UMT material was
carefully injected by minorities

desiring to side track the meet-
ing.
Efforts to bring the Taft-Hart-
ley Bill into the lobby failed. Only
a few *Anti-Taft Hartley Bill"
buttons appeared, although the
group intending to visit the Pres-
ident on UMT included a union
man.
Jim Crowism
Jim Crowism cropped up when
one group of delegates lobbied on
this issue instead of UMT. An en-
tirely commendable resolution had
condemned prejudice earlier be-
cause of the varied racial back-
ground of the delegates.
When the conference adjourned
little of the Communist battle
had been won. Ofle resolution con-
demned the red-baiting of the
conference, but had been support-
ed by all political shades.
The intended purpose of the
conference-an anti-UMT lobby
-was achieved.
The lowly cabbage was wor-
shipped in the religion of the an-
cient Egyptians, according to the
World Book Encyclopedia. k

A

Executive Positions
AWAIT TRAINED MEN

in Retailing
AND WOMEN

Attractive, responsible positions in stores or in teaching await the gradu-
Ptes of foremost School of Retailing. Careers in buying, adyertising, per-
sonnet management, fashion and other specialized fields beckon to
college-trained men and women of 'varied talents. The unique one-year
program offered by New York University for men and women college
gradnates, leading to a master's degree, combines practical instruction,
imn"ect market contacts, and invaluable "New York experience" (planned,
swpervised work experience--withpay) in well-known New York stores.
Wrilte for fall details

a
rye'

Reqtest Bulletin C-24
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF RETAILING
100 Washington Square, New York 3, N.Y.

F . . o.. ..

'

By KENNETH LOWE
When our reporter dropped in
on the West Quad Radio Club
in the Williams House tower one
night this week, he found its
members huddled eagerly about
their short wave equipment,
meeting for the first time this
semester.
"We're just getting reorgan-
ized," Bruce Weinert, vice-presi-
dent of the club, told our report-
er, "so don't expect to hear 'In
the Hall of the Mountain King'
tonight."
Our reporter ' explained tha-t
nothing was farther from his
mind and asked about the equip-
ment. Weinert pointed to an ar-
ray that included a speech ampli-
fier, frequency meter, tuning re-
ceiver and a 700-watt transmitter,
most of which was purchased
from Army surplus.
Rotary Beam Antenna
"We plan to increase our trans-
mitting power ten-fold in the near
future by installing a four-ele-
ment directive array rotary beam
antennae," Corky Eberwein, pres-
ident .of the club, said. Our re-
porter was understandably im-
pressed by the name of the in-
strument, as well as by its size,
which will be 85 feet.
The club-known to the trade
as amateur, or ham, station W8-
ZSQ- has contacted other sta-
tions over an area extending from
Twin Falls, Ida., to Woonsocket,
R. I., but has not yet established
communications with any foreign
countries. "That would be a def..
inite possibility with our new an-
tennae, though," Eberwein said
proudly.
Certified Members
W8ZSQ has been operating on
and 'off since May, sending and

kept our reporter awake nights
-namely, what do radio amateurs
talk about when 'they are operat-
ing - was answered with more
conviction. "Equipment," Eber-1
wein said. "Some operators get
to know one another pretty well
on the circuits and then they
might talk about anything from
family problems to presidential
candidates. But mostly they just
talk about equipment.'
Classic Movle
To Be Show
Alfred Hitchcock's classic mys-
tery, "The Lady Vanishes," will be
presented at 8:30 p.m., Sunday a
and Monday at Kellogg Audito-
rium by the Art Cinema League
and the, Student World Federal-
ists.
Starring Michael Redgrave,
Margaret Lockwood and Paul Lu-
kas, this film was influential in
bringing about Hitchcock's fame
in the United States.
All the action of the story takes
place on a fast trans-European
train. A charming, elderly woman
passenger disappears and a search
is conducted throughout the train.
The surprise denouncement re-
veals that this is a plot involving
espionage and counter-espionage
on the eve of the second World
War.+
A short, "The Feeling of Rejec-
tion," will be shown along with
"The Lady ,Vanishes.",
Tickets will be on sale in Uni-
versity Hall from 10 a.m. to noon
and from 1 to 4 p.m. Tickets will
also be available at Kellogg Au-

GOOD
Listening

1'
- ..z . J."" .
AI

Phone 5540
or stop in at
510 E. William
HALF HOUR LAUNDRY
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SERVICE 25c

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A smart dress that
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Crush resistant
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Sizes 10 to 18.
10.95
SPORT SHOP

1600
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.

receiving messages in both code ditorium the
and voice. Most of its members formances.
have Class B operating certifi- i
cates and one member, George
Crane, holds a Class A certificate.
Asked to explain the origin of
the word "ham"-a problem that
has long perplexed our reporter-
the members expressed uncer-
tainty. One suggested that the.
word might have come into usage
about 30 years ago when radio
amateurs were given to present-
ing skits, which non-operators re-
garded as pure corn. laieOrtos
Talkative Operators
Another quest Ion which has!

nights of the per-

Alexandra de M
VIRGIN FLO)
HAND CRE
IN A
8 OZ. ECONOMY

Ullr Ski Club To Show
Olympic Film in Color
"Olympic Preview," a skiing
film in color, will be shown at 8
p.m. tonight and Saturday at Kel-
logg Auditorium under the aus-
pices of Ullr Ski Club.
The picture, which is being
shown for the benefit of the Olym-
pic Ski Fund, combines the talents
of America's foremost skiers with
Lowell Thomas' narrationandthe{
photography of Dick Durrance,
famous sports photographer.
Tickets can be obtained at the
Union desk or at the auditorium
before performances.
Prof. Hobbs To Lecture
Prof. Emeritus William H.
Hobbs, of the geology department,
will give an illustrated lecture on
"Ancient Glaciers of North Amer-
ica" at Bowling Green State Uni-
versity Tuesday.

1
arkoff
WER
EAM
NEW
rSIZE
1.650 T
or $Y
C°TORY OFFER

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69 c 6big-eyelet

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6.95
I I (

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