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May 28, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE NITCHICAN DMLY

FltIDA.Y,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY.

ONE HOUR A WEEK:
'U' ROTC Pays $575
To Students in Training
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an interpretive article explaining the functions
of the University R'OTC in the light of recent political developments.)
By LILIAS WAGNER
How would you like to be paid $575 for taking a course during
the last two years in the University?
* * * *
This is the question being asked now by the University ROTC.
It is well known that draft measures are being considered by
Congress. One of the bills exempts advanced ROTC students from
the draft. As a consequence, and for other reasons, it is well to
examine what the Reserve Officers Training Corps has to offer.
The basic two-year course involves one hour of class per
week. During the last two years, which are voluntary, the student
attends five hour classes. '
He receives academic credit and cash, paid monthly, amount-
ing to the afore-mentioned sum of nearly $600 for the two
years. In addition, uniforms, required for one period a week,
equipment and' text are furnished throughout the four-year
course.
* * * :
Successful students, upon graduation, are offered commissions
in the officers' Reserve Corps and those in the upper third of the
ROTC class are eligible for Regular Army or Air Corps Commissions.
The student is under no military obligation whatsoever; however,
in event of national emergency, he would be prepared to take his
place as a leader.
A veteran with more than one year service in any of the Armed
Forces may enroll in the Advanlced Course. Among the branches open
are Infantry, Military Police, Quartermaster Corps and Air Force.
Other branches are open to medical students, physics majors
and engineering students.
* * * *
This is the set-up offered by the ROTC. Before planning next
year's courses, it is worth careful thought by the men on campus.
Further information is available by writing or calling Col. Karl E.
Henion, Professor of Military Science and Tactics, at ROTC head-
quarters, 512 S. State St., or at classification time next fall at the
ROTC desk.

Jobs Plentiful
For Foresters
This Summer
Variety of Positions
Available to Students
This year summer job oppor-
tunities for forestry students are
excellent, according to Prof. Wil-
lett F. Ramsdell, of the forestry
and conservation school.
The largest number of students
are being employed by the U.S.
Forest Service at various national
forests, experimental stations and
tree nurseries in the lake states,
the Rocky Mountains, and the
Pacific Coast area.
Unskilled Labor
The nature of the work ranges
from unskilled labor, such as'
eradication of plants bearing the
blister rust parasite, to highly
skilled work involving aerial photo
surveys.
Other jobs which will keep the
young Paul Bunyans occupied
during the next three months are
work on fire control crews, con-
struction crews, timber survey
par'ties, and lookout stations.
Enthusiasm Outlets
Forestry students who are en-
tered in the school's wild life pro-
gram can find outlets for their
enthusiasm in summer jobs creat-
ed by the Pittman-Robertson Act
for acquisition of lands for game
refuge. Students employed in this
type of work would serve as as-
sistants to the land inspectors.
Private logging and pulpwood
companies also give the student
opportunity to make use of his
summer vacation with positions'
involving the cruising and
mapping of timber, and log seal-
ing.

Prizes Giwen
In Hopwood
Ceremonies
(Continued from Page 1)
mtjor essay contest. The winner
in this division was Peter James
Stanlis, Trenton, a graduate stu-
dent who won $600 for "Essays in
the Via Media Tradition."
In the minor essay contest the
winners were Judith Laiken, De-
troit, who won $250 for "The Edu-
cation of Rachel Benoni," and
William George Wiegand, who re-
ceived $200 for "The Golden
Touch in the Popular Arts." Miss
Laiken won freshman prizes in
poetry and fiction in 1946.
Judges in the essay contest were
Alan Devoe, writer and naturalist;
Harrison Smith, editor of the
"Saturday Review of Literature";
and John T. Winterich, editor of
"Colophon."
Two awards were made in the
major poetry contest. Top prize
went to Everett Warner Bovard,
Jr., Rye, N.Y., who received $700
for "Poems." Constance Opal
Rinehart won $600 for "This
Country Called Home."
In the minor poetry contest two
awards of $150 were given. They
went to Anne Davidow Seeger, De-
troit, for "The Collected Poems of
James McCready," and to Renee
Eleanor Schneider, Far Rockaway,
N.Y., for "The Man Who Grows."
Judges in the poetry contest
were John Ciardi, poet and former
Hopwood winner; Karl Shapiro,
New York poet; and Marion Stro-
bel, poet and editor of "Poetry"
magazine.

IT'S NO LARK:
Reading Hard, Day and Dar
SicklyStudent, Healthy Ma

By JOMISNER
Cramming makes for a sickly
student but a healthy grade card,
according to members of the psy-
chology department contacted by
The Daily yesterday,
"A little learning is better than
none," declared Harold Guetzkow,
Project Co-Ordinator of Confer-
ence Research.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, Health
Service director, advised students
it is "common sense not to ex-
haust themselves so that they can
do justice to what they have
learnedin thepast semester."
He also warned students to
avoid taking anything to keep

awake other than a "reasons
amount" of coffee. "Any reso
ing to chemicals to keep aw
is like whipping a tired horse,'
declared.
Most common varieties of
pills" probably contain noth
more than caffein anyway,
Forsythe said, and the use
other drugs may cause "unju
fiable stimulation" of the me
anisms of the body.
"A good many emotional pi
lems come when it's time to
up accounts--especially when p
pie are short on change,",Da-.I
sythe declared.

4 BER
DEPO0T
BEER MIXERS WIh
CHAMPAGNE & SNACK<
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE
Daily: 1OA.M.-10P.M. Sunday: Noon-7
NO PARKING PROBLEMS
'114 East Williams Call

4E

FNAL SPLASH OF MERCURY-B-ob Freed and Doris Seder, co-
chairman of the 1948 United Jewish Appeal at the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation, mark the JA thermometer 'over the top.' The
group collected $8,800 to aid Jewish people migrating to Palestine,
surpassing their quota by $1,300.
WEARY MAILMEN:
Letters Pie U for Judge
In Quiz Kid Teacher Contest

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The mailman over at education
school has trudged wearily to Rm.
2509 a little more than usual late-
ly.
Prof. Willard Olsen, director of
the University Elementary School,
is one of the three judges choos-
ing the outstanding teacher in the
country in the contest sponsored
by the Quiz Kid show.
'Helped Me Most'
Announced over the air in
March, thirty-five thousand
youngsters have written letters on
"The Teacher Who Helped Me
Most."
From there the judges started
out. They selected the teachers
whom they were impressed by and
contacted them. Each would-be
winner wrote out her philosophy
and returned it to the judges for
study. Each administration sent in
Residence Halls
University residence halls willj
close for the year Sunday, June
13, with food being served only'
through Saturday, June 5, accord-
ing to Francis Shell, residence
hall business manager.
East Quadrangle, Stockwell Hall
and University House will be open
during the summer and be ready
for occupancy June 15 and food
will be served beginning Monday,
June 21.

a report on their candidate. The
judges went over this material and
picked the teachers for personal
interviews.
$2,500 to Winner
The winning teacher will receive
$2,500 for graduate study and two
runners-up will receive $1,000
awards. The child writing the
winning letter will also be re-
warded.
Chairman of the judging is Dr.
Paul Witty, profess"r of educa-
tion at Northwestern. Father
Moore, dean of the Graduate
School at Notre Dame is the other
member of the trio.
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
S HOO(iF LAW
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-year Evening course
CO-ED)UCATIONAL.
Member Asii ,of Amer. Law Schools
Accredited College Degree Required
for Admission
Veterans of World War II who have
completed two years of college work
toward c degreemaymatri-
culate vithiin e ytear of honorable
disciarge.
Full transcript of record reqjuired in
YAR CLASS , BEGINS
: E; em ber 27, 1948
Fw 'fu tinforination address
I'GiST°R FORDHAM UNIV.
SCHOOL OF LAW
302 Broaidway, New York 7, N.Y.

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5
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H ERE is a book every Michigan
Alumnus or friend will value
for years to come. For in this infor-
mal, lively book, Kent Sagendorph
tells the whole story of "the first
really democratic University in
America". from its founding,
through the great Circus riot to the
present day achievements. This
frank and analytical chronicle in-
cludes full-length biographical por-
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major events. With 14 pages of
illustra"" onss $4.50

INCLUDED ARE SUCH
HIGHLIGHTS AS
A Madelon Stockwell,
America's first co-ed.
A "Hurry-up" Yost and
the first Rose Bowl vic-
tory.
A Joe's and the Orient
and the Pretzel Bell.
A The "Society War"
over Rule 20.
f The plots against
Pres. Tappan and his
stormy dismissal.

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