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May 27, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 271,E

Book Exchange Will Reopen
In Fall Term, IFC Announces

Campus
Calendlar

I

I I

cU' Men's Glee Club Elects
Officers, Presents Awards

The Student Book Exchange for
next semester will open Monday,
September 13, and will be located
in Rm. 306 of the Union, the In-
ter-fraternity Council announced
yesterday.
The non-profit organization,
sponsored by the Inter-fraternity
Council, is equipped to help the
students buy and sell their text-
books directly. By using this serv-
ice, students can sell their books
for higher prices and buy for
lower prices than they can at
local bookstores.
Dale Drollinger, newly appoint-

ed manager of the Exchange, said,
"Every effort is being made to
have the book exchange serve all
the students." Each semester a
new manager and assistant man-
ager are appointed.
Last year, 2,700 books were
handled by the Exchange with
1,800 books sold. The aim for the
coming year is to handle 5,000
books, according to Drollinger.
All sales are final. Books can-
not be returned once they have
been sold.
The Exchange will remain open
until Friday, September 29.

Wallace Progressives - 4 p.m..
international Center tea -4:30-
5:30 p.m., special guests, graduat-
ing students.
Radio - 5:45 p.m., WPAG,
Campus News.
Faculty Committee on the
Mundt Bill -- Discussion, 8 p.m~,
Rackham .Amphitheatre. .Dean
Keniston will preside, Prof. Slos-
son and Prof. Cox will speak.
Graduate School Record Con-
cert - cancelled because of ex-
aminations.

The University of Michigan
Men's Glee Club has brought its
cason to a close by electing new
officers and awarding keys to 39
members.
The new officers elected are:
Philip W. Morris, president, Row-
land H. McLaughlin, Vice-presi-
dent; C. Wayne Wright. Secre-
tary; and Donald S. Cleveland,
Treasurer.
A number of awards were also
made by the Glee Club. The Paul
Taplor Memorial Trophy, which
goes annually to the member who
has made the most outstanding
contribution to the club, was
awarded to Milton H. David, for-
mer business manager.
An award of $350 also went to
David and another one was given

to Russell B. Clanahan. A third
award was split between Donald
S. Cleveland and Robert A. Elson.
$175 going to each.
The awards are provided as a
reward for the contribution of
time, effort and talent to the Uni-
versity and to foster interest in
the activities of the Club,
In addition, Club keys were also
given to members, based on the
years of service. Four year keys
went to Rowland McLaughlin, and
Dean Walter B. Rea. Milton Da-
vid, Joseph Fischer. Richard
Hammel, Philip Morris, William
Phebus and Sanger Westphal re-
ceived three year keys.
A number of one and two year
keys were also awarded.

l '

A

NEW TECHNIC STAFF-Pictured are the men who will edit
Left to right-David Stein, associate editor, James Chandler,
editor-in-chief and Lexie Herrin, managing editor.

the Technic for1
business manager,

Daily-Wise
the fall semester.
Gerard Giczewski,

I

Three Middle Atlantic States
List Requirements for Voters

The list of voting regulations by
states, presented by The Daily in
cooperation with the Young Dem-
ocrats' Club, continues:
MIDDLE ATDANTIS: New Jer-
sey, New York, Pennsylvania.
New Jersey: In order to vote in
New Jersey, a citizen must have
been a resident of the state for
one year, of the county five
months. Registration is open up
to 40 days before an election in
the office of the Supervisor of
Elections, but you must register
in person. Registration is perma-
nent.
New York: Here too, registra-
tion is required in person, but you
must register for each election. In
order to vote, a citizen must have
been a resident of the State one
year, of the county, city or village
4 months, and of the election dis-
trict 30 days. Although dates for
1948 registration have not yet'

been set, registration must take'
place in PERSON.
Pennsylvania: In order to vote,
a citizen must have been a resi-
dent of the Commonwealth I year
of the county and precinct 2
months. Native born Pennsylvan-
ians and previously qualified elec-
tors must have resided within the
state 6 months preceding the
elections. Registration may be
made any time before 50 days
immediately preceding an elec
tion, 5 days after the primary,
and 30 days after the general and
municipal elections, except in
Philadelphia, where you may reg-
ister any time except 50 days be-
fore an election, election day, 5
days after a primary, and the 30
days after a general election. Re-
gistration is automatically can-
celled for failure to vote every 2
years.

VETS CHECKS
Checks are being held a the
Ann Arbor Post Office and will be
returned to Columbus on June 10,
for the following veterans:
Albert, Roy I.; Brown, Arthuri
H., Jr.; Johnston, Charles R.;
Keller, Herman A.; Powers, Wil-
liam F.; Rich, William W.; Ryan,
John A.; and Sefton, Harold D.

State - Alberquerque" 1, 3.
5. 7 and 9.
Michigan - "Brief Encounter"
1. 3, 5, 7 and 9.
Whitney -- "Dangerous Years"
and "Fighting the Vigilantes."
Wuerth - "Crime Doctor" and
"Monsieur Verdoux."
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models'
of all makes «-
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DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
Speech 119 Examination: Mon-
day, May 31, 9-12, 202 Eco. Bldg.
Speech 134 Examination: June
3, 9-12, 2219 A.H.
Concerts
Student Recital: Ruthann Perry
FitzGerald, soprano, a pupil of Ar-
thur Hackett, will be heard at
8:30 p.m., Thurs., May 27; Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Her pro-
gram is presented in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Music,
and will be open to the general
public.
Students of the Chamber Music
Class of Oliver Edel will be heard
in a program at 8:30 p.m., Fri.,
May 28, in the Rackham Assembly
Hall. It will include Mozart's
Quintetto in G Minor, K. 516,
Haydn's Quartet, in G major, Op.
77, No. 1, and Brahms' Quartet in
C minor, Op. 51, No. 1. The gen-
eral public will be admitted with-
out charge.
Student Recital: Lois Forburg-
er, pianist, will present a program
at 8:30 p.m., Mon., May 31, in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Bachelor
of Music. Miss Forburger is a pu-
pil of Joseph Brinkman. She will
play works by Bach, Beethoven,
Brahms, Ravel, and Chopin. The
public is invited.
Events Today
Radio Programs:
5:45 p.m. WPAG-Campus News
Seminar in Applied Mathemat-
ics will be held at 4:00 p.m. in Rm.
247 W. Eng. Mr. Frederick Gehr-
ing will give a preliminary report
on Sturm-Liouville transforma-
tions.

International Center weekly tea:
4:30-5:30 p.m. Hostesses: Mrs. Lau
H. Ransom and Mrs. Wilfred
Shaw. Special guests, graduating
students.
Faculty Committee on the
Mundt Bill announces a meeting
for discussion of the Bill on Thurs-
day, May 27, at 8:00 p.m. in the
Amphitheatre of the Rackham
Bldg. Dean Keniston will preside.
Professor Preston Slosson and
Prof. Kenneth Cox will speak. The
public is invited.
Michigan Dames Music group
meets at 8 p.m. at the home of
Mrs.- Glenn Hoffman,-4.10 Flor-
ence, Ypsilanti. The program on
Early English Music was arranged
by Mrs. C. L. Gibson; the Clef
Club will sing.
Coming Events
Women of the University Facul-,
ty: Informal tea, 4:30 p.m., Fri-
day, May 28, club lounge, Michi-
gan League. Members from the
Museums and the School of Archi-
tecture will be in charge.
Geology and Mineralogy Jour-
nal Club: Mr. R. J. Cordell of Col-
gate University will speak on
"Techniques in Micropaleontolo-
gy" Fri., May 28, at 12:00, Room
3055, ...S. All interested are cor-
dially welcome.
O We Have Enjoyed
Serving You ..s
The /Suden/s of the Univer-
city of Michigan.
Goo e mid 'ood lh 1cto
al-espccialy the class of
'48.
RAMSAY-CANFIELDIv
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(Across from P-Bell)
o < ho n e 90 = ><

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America's first co-ed.
A "Hurry-up" Yost and
the first Rose Bowl vic-
tory.
A Joe's and the Orient
and the Pretzel Bell.
A The "Society War"
over Rule 20.
A The plots against
Pres. Tappan and his
stormy dismissal.

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